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15 hours ago, Thompson said:

Repulsive for sure.  Look at those knees.  How can you be a femme fatale with knees like that?

I've heard of some strange sexual fetishes before, but KNEES are a new one on me!  ;)  I dunno.....

I don't recall ever sitting around at the beach or hangin' with my buds on a street corner  in the summer and watching girls stroll by and think, "Wow!  Lookit the KNEES on THAT one!"  :D 

Sepiatone 

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

I've heard of some strange sexual fetishes before, but KNEES are a new one on me!  ;)  I dunno.....

I don't recall ever sitting around at the beach or hangin' with my buds on a street corner  in the summer and watching girls stroll by and think, "Wow!  Lookit the KNEES on THAT one!"  :D 

Sepiatone 

The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946) Archives » BAMF Style

"Cora, your knees! A man can only contain himself so long."

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17 hours ago, TomJH said:

Lana Turner | The Film Noir Report

Repulsive. I don't know why Garfield didn't throw up when he saw her.

I certainly would not throw up either but I am not particularly wowed by her. Dress up any number of our most attractive female stars in this outfit and they will all look splendid. This iconic view of Land has never really moved me thourh, and I have a lot good red blood in me. Yes, yes, yes, very pretty but rather staid and even boring. But that's Lana, every curl in place and always the picture of propriety. Even when Femme Fatale. Like I say, very, very, very pretty, but little true Eros (for me).. Maybe Lana is not my type.. Okay, I am in no position to be choosy but you know what mean, photos like this of great stars are a dime a dozen and they all cannot please everybody. 

:ph34r::D

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

From what I understand there were a lot of guys to whom Lana did not say this word.

By all contemporary accounts this is true.

Including, IRL, John Garfield.

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21 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Yes.

Including, IRL, John Garfield.

Garfield said, "Our eyes would meet and we both knew we were going to have to do it. It was like you couldn't let the home team down. Everyone was waiting for it."

According to author Robert Nott's He Ran All the Way the "it" happened after director Tay Garnett went on a bender in the middle of production after the cast and crew located to San Clemente Beach. Filming came to halt, Garfield and Turner were hanging out together and, . . . well. Though it turned out to be a one night stand the two actors remained on friendly terms with one another. Garfield's wife may have had suspicions and showed up at the beach site on a number of occasions. There is even a picture of Lana and Garfield relaxing on the beach together, with a woman in the background who maybe, just maybe, was Mrs. Garfield observing them.

John Garfield and Lana Turner in Laguna Beach, filming THE POSTMAN – Once  upon a screen…

I'm not certain if this is the photo to which Nott referred. One source said this is actually Laguna Beach, where they first started filming the beach scene.

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16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Garfield said, "Our eyes would meet and we both knew we were going to have to do it. It was like you couldn't let the home team down. Everyone was waiting for it."

According to author Robert Nott's He Ran All the Way the "it" happened after director Tay Garnett went on a bender in the middle of production after the cast and crew located to San Clemente Beach. Filming came to halt, Garfield and Turner were hanging out together and, . . . well. Though it turned out to be a one night stand the two actors remained on friendly terms with one another. Garfield's wife may have had suspicions and showed up at the beach site on a number of occasions. There is even a picture of Lana and Garfield relaxing on the beach together, with a woman in the background who maybe, just maybe, was Mrs. Garfield observing them.

John Garfield and Lana Turner in Laguna Beach, filming THE POSTMAN – Once  upon a screen…

I'm not certain if this is the photo to which Nott referred. One source said this is actually Laguna Beach, where they first started filming the beach scene.

The photo looks like Laguna Beach more so than San Clemente Beach.     Spend the 4th of July at San Clemente Beach and pier since they have a fireworks show and my wife's cousin is the executive chef at the restaurant at the pier.   They take over the entire pier for the 4th so we went with the chef's mom (wife's godmother), and had a great time.  

   

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

I certainly would not throw up either but I am not particularly wowed by her. Dress up any number of our most attractive female stars in this outfit and they will all look splendid. This iconic view of Land has never really moved me thourh, and I have a lot good red blood in me. Yes, yes, yes, very pretty but rather staid and even boring. But that's Lana, every curl in place and always the picture of propriety. Even when Femme Fatale. Like I say, very, very, very pretty, but little true Eros (for me).. Maybe Lana is not my type.. Okay, I am in no position to be choosy but you know what mean, photos like this of great stars are a dime a dozen and they all cannot please everybody. 

:ph34r::D

You are of the same opinion of Lana Turner as my husband,  who has never been much of a fan of hers'.  When I've asked him,  "but she's supposed to be so gorgeous !?"  he says,   " yeah,  but she always looks like she's made out of wax."

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Actually,  I'm going to come right out and say The Postman Always Rings Twice, iconic noir though it is supposed to be,  leaves me cold.  I don't like the two main characters,   -- and I'm generally a Garfield fan -- and their story is not interesting to me.  I don't know why,  theoretically it checks all the boxes.  I think it's partly because I feel sorry for Lana's husband,  the poor guy just doesn't deserve to be offed like that.  You'd think they would have taken it as a sign to leave him alone when the carefully calibrated plan to do him in doesn't work the first time....but no,  if at first you don't succeed, try, try , again.   I mean poor old Nick,  he trusts Frank and likes him.  Ok,  maybe he's a bit dumb and naive,  but since when were those qualities justification for murder?

It's a bit different with the slightly similar plot device in Double Indemnity  (  ok,  very different story but the trope of murdering the femme fatale's husband for cash is the same).  This is because unlike poor NIck Smith the diner owner in Postman,  Stanwyck's  husband is quite nasty and ill-tempered and dislikable.  So although he doesn't deserve the fate  Babs and Fred dole out to him,  you don't feel sorry for  him the way you do for Nick.  That's my take, anyway.

But even aside from the  "poor guy doesn't deserve to be murdered"  thing I have   ( after all,  if I were repelled by every noir that featured the murder of an innocent person I'd watch precious few noirs),  The Postman  Always Rings Twice  is one of my least favourite  noirs.  It doesn't entertain me in the way most noirs do.  I find it kind of dreary.    I probably wouldn't be so negative about it if it weren't regarded as one  of the top ten most classic noirs of all time blahblah.  Not for me.

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".......For a remarkable stretch from roughly late 1989 to early 2001, Hollywood eagerly churned out dozens of neo-noirs: salacious, deeply satisfying dramas featuring shifting loyalties and twisting turns, often with titles that could have been ripped straight from the pulp-paperback racks. The Last Seduction. Shallow Grave. Basic Instinct. The Usual Suspects. One False Move.

Some neo-noirs took place in a teeming corrupt metropolis; others played out underneath the scorching desert sun. But their embittered heroes—if you can even call them that—all shared a lust for money or sex (or both) and a malleable code of ethics:.................

But film noir isn’t just a style; it’s very much a mood. The most effective noirs, no matter when they were made, convey a sense of murky amorality—a feeling that everything’s a bit cockeyed. “Even if a movie’s set in New York or L.A., the noir world is not the real world,” notes Helgeland, who also cowrote and directed the ’90s revenge noir Payback.

“It’s a strange world that’s almost half in your head.”.................

Today, the ’90s are remembered by many as The Last Time Things Weren’t Terrible. But the noirs of that time are a reflection of what was actually a disorienting, destabilizing era, one full of economic stressors and prime-time traumas: the L.A. riots, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Gulf War.

“There are a lot of parallels between the ’40s and the ’90s,”.........

In ’90s noir, sometimes you really could get away with murder. “It’s underscoring this idea that evil can never be truly defeated,” says Fiore. “Badness can’t be punished.”..........

 

......While a few 2000s films would carry on the noir tradition—including Brick, Out of Time, Drive, Winter’s Bone, and Steven Soderbergh’s recent No Sudden Move—the genre’s popularity began a visible decline, at least among studio executives, thanks to the same culprit that slowed down the original noir streak in the ’50s: television.....................

 

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46 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Actually,  I'm going to come right out and say The Postman Always Rings Twice, iconic noir though it is supposed to be,  leaves me cold.  I don't like the two main characters,   -- and I'm generally a Garfield fan -- and their story is not interesting to me.  I don't know why,  theoretically it checks all the boxes.  I think it's partly because I feel sorry for Lana's husband,  the poor guy just doesn't deserve to be offed like that.  You'd think they would have taken it as a sign to leave him alone when the carefully calibrated plan to do him in doesn't work the first time....but no,  if at first you don't succeed, try, try , again.   I mean poor old Nick,  he trusts Frank and likes him.  Ok,  maybe he's a bit dumb and naive,  but since when were those qualities justification for murder?

It's a bit different with the slightly similar plot device in Double Indemnity  (  ok,  very different story but the trope of murdering the femme fatale's husband for cash is the same).  This is because unlike poor NIck Smith the diner owner in Postman,  Stanwyck's  husband is quite nasty and ill-tempered and dislikable.  So although he doesn't deserve the fate  Babs and Fred dole out to him,  you don't feel sorry for  him the way you do for Nick.  That's my take, anyway.

But even aside from the  "poor guy doesn't deserve to be murdered"  thing I have   ( after all,  if I were repelled by every noir that featured the murder of an innocent person I'd watch precious few noirs),  The Postman  Always Rings Twice  is one of my least favourite  noirs.  It doesn't entertain me in the way most noirs do.  I find it kind of dreary.    I probably wouldn't be so negative about it if it weren't regarded as one  of the top ten most classic noirs of all time blahblah.  Not for me.

Lana's hubby wasn't so nice. He was going to uproot her and take him to his (sisters?) and make her work and take care of her in the Ozarks somewhere. I would've offed him for that!

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10 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Lana's hubby wasn't so nice. He was going to uproot her and take him to his (sisters?) and make her work and take care of her in the Ozarks somewhere. I would've offed him for that!

It was Canada actually, far northern Canada...

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Just now, txfilmfan said:

It was Canada actually, far northern Canada...

Well then,  that would be ok.

Seems like every time Hollywood wanted to have a character go somewhere remote and boring and uncivilized,  it was always Canada.

Not so with the other country bordering the U.S......many noir protagonists aspired to go there !

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well then,  that would be ok.

Seems like every time Hollywood wanted to have a character go somewhere remote and boring and uncivilized,  it was always Canada.

Not so with the other country bordering the U.S......many noir protagonists aspired to go there !

I remember years ago looking up the town that was mentioned.  It's at something like 67 N.  I don't know how you would've gotten there in the 1940s.  Must have taken a long time.

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16 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Lana's hubby wasn't so nice. He was going to uproot her and take him to his (sisters?) and make her work and take care of her in the Ozarks somewhere. I would've offed him for that!

Hibi,  you are a harsh judge.  😏   Maybe Nick was a bit insensitive to what Cora wanted,  but this hardly merits offing him.  Plus,  he naively  (one might say stupidly) believed Cora loved him and wanted to be with him ,  so I guess he thought,  where he goes,  his wife goes.

The whole plan to murder Nick was based on Cora's refusal to accept being poor,  she had no interest in trying to make a go of it with Frank the honest way.  To me she's an unsympathetic and dislikable character.  And not as much fun to watch as Phyllis Dietrichson was  to make up for it !

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26 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Hibi,  you are a harsh judge.  😏   Maybe Nick was a bit insensitive to what Cora wanted,  but this hardly merits offing him.  Plus,  he naively  (one might say stupidly) believed Cora loved him and wanted to be with him ,  so I guess he thought,  where he goes,  his wife goes.

The whole plan to murder Nick was based on Cora's refusal to accept being poor,  she had no interest in trying to make a go of it with Frank the honest way.  To me she's an unsympathetic and dislikable character.  And not as much fun to watch as Phyllis Dietrichson was  to make up for it !

Well, I don't find hubby sympathetic either!

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17 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Well, I don't find hubby sympathetic either!

Ah well, this'll have to be one of those "agree to disagree" things.  But anyway,  my feeling bad for the "unsympathetic" husband Nick is not the only reason why I don't like The Postman Always Rings Twice.  I don't really know why it doesn't work for me, it just doesn't.  But then,  I don't much like The Lady from Shanghai, another film often listed as one of the top 10 iconic noirs.  I am perverse.  sorry.

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The fascination of The Postman Always Rings Twice, I feel, is in viewing the film as an exploration of the depths to which two seemingly ordinary people can plunge. This, of course, is an earmark of many film noirs.

In regard to that the heart of the film, for me, at least, is the performance of John Garfield. LanaTurner is very good in her role and probably delivers the performance of a career of an actress better known for her immaculate, studio dream girl blonde good looks than acting ability. But it's the soulful, tormented Garfield who brings a human element to the flawed weak character of Frank Chambers. He's a drifter with nothing more on his mind at the film's beginning than the source of his next meal who, as the film evolves,  gradually becomes so enamoured and obsessed with a woman that he will eventually be ready to commit a murder over her.

At the film's start killing anyone was the last thought on Chamber's mind and the emotionally compelling aspect of this film for me is in watching Garfield's gradual transformation from aimless drifter to man in love or, at least, obsessed to murderer to a frightened individual who, from fear of the law and the consequences of his actions, is ready to turn against that same woman who had once been such an object of desire for him. Watching Frank and Cora, previously so physically and emotionally drawn to one another, warily circle each other after the law has become involved adds to the fascination of this study of the dark and perplexing actions of which some humans are capable.

Garfield makes me understand the flawed character of obsession and later fear that he plays. You don't admire him. You're not expected to. But how many of us are weak enough that, due to lust or obsession or loneliness or avarice or whatever, we could, too, could potentially, through unforeseen circumstances, be in his position as well. Remember, at the film's beginning, like all of us, murder was the last thing on Frank's mind.

As Garfield sits in the back of the car and reaches for that bottle to commit a terrible crime which, in turn, will forever tie him to a female accomplice in the front seat, we are witnessing the depths towards which a person can stoop. That person, flawed and terribly wrong, is also frighteningly human.

The Urban Politico: Movie Reviews: The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946)

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Very good analysis, it’s exactly what you feel when reading the Cain novel.  I think Garfield is a great actor, sort of a precursor to the method acting school.  But Lana Turner turns me off, and I think she brings Garfield down in this film.

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