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When Body Heat first came out in 1981, a friend who'd seen it said she liked it and that it had a lot of actors from the soaps in it. That's not how anyone would describe it today, but she was absolutely right. Ted Danson was then best known, if at all, for a stint on Somerset toward the end of its run; Lanna Saunders had played a Horton daughter on Days of Our Lives; Michael Ryan, playing a lawyer on Body Heat, had played Pat Randolph's lawyer husband on Another World for years; I believe J. A. Preston had been on Another World at one time; and Kim Zimmer had been a cast replacement on The Doctors, replacing .  . . Kathleen Turner. The character, Nola Dancy, was created by Kathryn Harrold, who went off to Hollywood to star in Modern Romance and Yes, Giorgio! Harrold wasn't bad, but Kathleen Turner far surpassed her, and Kim Zimmer, who would go on to star for years as Reva on Guiding Light, was almost that good.

Thus Kathleen Turner in 1981 was unknown to almost everyone except soap fans, and the casting of Kim Zimmer in Body Heat was a perfect touch.

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11 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Can't see how [LORNA being a gay man] that disqualifies [Him from appreciating the exquisiteness of Kathleen Turner’s breasts in BODY HEAT]

Thank you for this. 
I sometimes become a little too comfortable in my elitist, gay bubble where I like to think of myself as someone with superhero powers just because [USUALLY]a pair of (glorious) bazooms don’t work on me.
I can be terribly, terribly close minded about some things! 

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Seriously though, I know she was/is a legit HUGE TALENT as an actress, But if Kathleen Turner had done a whole series of topless roles in the 1980s she would probably be one of the biggest box office stars of all time.

“KATHLEEN TURNER VACUUMS IN THE NUDE” would’ve BLOWN THE BOX OFFICE OF “E.T. “ OUT OF THE WATER!!!!!!

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18 hours ago, Walter_Wpg said:

For another film with a premise similar to "Double Indemnity" and "Body Heat", check out "China Moon" (1994), which stars Ed Harris and Madeleine Stowe.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Moon

It's certainly not as good as "Body Heat", but worth a look for fans and students of neo-noir .

 

You are correct about China Moon being worth a look.  Don't know if it has been mentioned, but when Body Heat came out, many compared it to Double Indemnity.  

One thing that really adds to Body Heat is the music.  It really fits and adds to the atmosphere.

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11 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Some [boathouses] are [built over water], some are built next to with some kind hoist or rail system to drag a boat in.

Later she says something about "just and old rowboat" being in there.

and thank you for this info too!

i really wish the boathouse had been over the water, and more of a "presence" in the film than it was. I know a boathouse is a kinda cliche place to set a mystery thriller, but as someone who has been inside a boathouse [built over the water], I will tell you THEY ARE A FABULOUS SETTING AND LOADED WITH ATMOSPHERE.

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This is my first post here and I'm woefully ignorant of the ins and outs of forums like this, but I joined to mention the ending in the version of Body Heat that was aired, which was different than the one Ben spoke about in the discussion afterwards and that I remembered seeing when the film originally came out. In the aired version Ms. Turner looks out to sea but instead of following her gaze the camera appears to pan up to a blank sky, a pretty weak end for such a visually rich film (there appeared to be some grain in the image suggesting cropping and panning post production). Ben said  the camera panned right to reveal two dogs on the beach,  I remember a boat sailing by which I saw as a metaphorical period, by way of contrast, being placed at the end of any freedom Hurt's character might be able to enjoy going forward, or perhaps it represented their love sailing away forever.  I did a little research and couldn't find any mention of alternate endings, odd though that TCM aired the one they did.

Earlier someone questioned the boathouse. I think it was filmed at low tide, when the tide comes in there should be enough water to launch a small boat from the double doors. 

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50 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

See the source image

 

52 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I will tell you THEY ARE A FABULOUS SETTING AND LOADED WITH ATMOSPHERE.

Sounds like spoken from experience.

After the horn-dogs had christened every room in the house the "boathouse" needed to be checked off the list too. Plus she needed him to have a connection to lure him to the trap. No sense in blowing up a perfectly good house. In that type of structure an actual boat would have solved the problem, and possibly created others. 

On the other hand,  they could have just called it a Beach-house or Cabana, which would have been more accurate.

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16 minutes ago, Little Nemo said:

In the aired version Ms. Turner looks out to sea but instead of following her gaze the camera appears to pan up to a blank sky,

Like this ?

 

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Los Tallos Amargos

Ok. I nodded off a couple times, so had to back up. That twist was obvious a mile away, way too predictable. Cinematography was good and bulk of the story line unique. The dream sequences were interesting in a Hitchcockian way, I'll have to go through them again to see if I can find any foreshadowing in there.

In all Eddie delivered on his promise with this one. 

And I watched the Travelogue Glimpses of Argentina before the movie. Not a single Llama, Alpaca, or historical reference. Just about how big horse racing is, the cattle industry -apparently steak is REALLY cheap- and there's a crap-ton of yacht clubs. 

 

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33 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

On the other hand,  they could have just called it a Beach-house or Cabana, which would have been more accurate.


or maybe, I dunno...Love Shack, baby?

(I've heard that's where it's at. )

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10 hours ago, kingrat said:

When Body Heat first came out in 1981, a friend who'd seen it said she liked it and that it had a lot of actors from the soaps in it. That's not how anyone would describe it today, but she was absolutely right. Ted Danson was then best known, if at all, for a stint on Somerset toward the end of its run; Lanna Saunders had played a Horton daughter on Days of Our Lives; Michael Ryan, playing a lawyer on Body Heat, had played Pat Randolph's lawyer husband on Another World for years; I believe J. A. Preston had been on Another World at one time; and Kim Zimmer had been a cast replacement on The Doctors, replacing .  . . Kathleen Turner. The character, Nola Dancy, was created by Kathryn Harrold, who went off to Hollywood to star in Modern Romance and Yes, Giorgio! Harrold wasn't bad, but Kathleen Turner far surpassed her, and Kim Zimmer, who would go on to star for years as Reva on Guiding Light, was almost that good.

Thus Kathleen Turner in 1981 was unknown to almost everyone except soap fans, and the casting of Kim Zimmer in Body Heat was a perfect touch.

copied and pasted from the wikipedia page on BODY HEAT:

Janet Maslin wrote that Body Heat was "skillfully, though slavishly, derived" from 1940s film noir classics; she stated that, "Mr. Hurt does a wonderful job of bringing Ned to life," but was not impressed by Turner's performance:

Sex is all-important to Body Heat, as its title may indicate. And beyond that there isn't much to move the story along or to draw these characters together. A great deal of the distance between [Ned and Matty] can be attributed to the performance of Miss Turner, who looks like the quintessential forties siren, but sounds like the soap-opera actress she is. Miss Turner keeps her chin high in the air, speaks in a perfect monotone, and never seems to move from the position in which Mr. Kasdan has left her.[14]

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:


or maybe, I dunno...Love Shack, baby?

(I've heard that's where it's at. )

. . . .but . . . tin roof, rusted . . .  so . . .

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10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Jealous, Janet?

Janet. . . 

I've got something to say

I really loved the skilful way
You beat the other girls to the bride's bouquet

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1 hour ago, Moe Howard said:

Like this ?

 

This is the one I remember having seen originally and the one on the DVD I have.  It really makes a good ending for the movie.

As for Turner's performance, I'll go with very good and fully captured the role.

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I was underwhelmed by GET CARTER, PULP, and LOS TALLOS AMARGOS.

Then Eddie tells us next week is CAUSE FOR ALARM.   

Is he joking or what.    

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20 hours ago, uncle charlie said:

I missed “Body Heat” but did catch “To Live and Die in LA”. It was my first time seeing it. I feel like if I had seen it when it was released (and I was twenty years old), I would have enjoyed it. However, watching it last night I found it to be a laughable parody of eighties movies. It was chock full of cliches right off the bat. In the first scene, the older partner actually says “I’m getting too old for this sh$t”. We then find out that he’s only got 3 days left ‘til retirement so we know he’s gonna die.  I enjoyed Eddie’s comment about throwing a chase scene in there. It felt like the chase scene from “The Seven-Ups” that was so epic you thought the movie was ending already. I also had a hard time taking John Pankow’s character seriously based on the types of roles I’ve seen him in. I made it through most of the movie but my general lack of interest caused me to miss most of the end other than the very last scene and the “outro” with Ben and Eddie. (I looked up the plot on wiki to fill in the gaps).

I nominate this movie to compete with “Lethal Weapon” as the ultimate ‘80’s-defining flick.

 

 

A few things here, maybe a bit off discussion, but I saw both and felt BODY HEAT was way better.   And you mention the chase scene in THE 7-UPS, in which I anger many sheep-headed people when I say I thought it WAY better than the one in BULLITT.  And as for that movie in general, IMO, it should be "Bullitt" with a capital "BULL".  ;) 

And really, you can't have just ONE movie as an  " '80's defining flick."  due to there are many that define that decade GENRE-wise.  Like VALLEY GIRL for the "coming of age" genre, or the Indiana Jones franchise for defining the ACTION/ADVENTURE genre, etc.  And each member here too, will have what they consider any decade "defining" film picks.  And I doubt there will be any conscensus. 

Sepiatone

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40 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I was underwhelmed by GET CARTER, PULP, and LOS TALLOS AMARGOS.

Then Eddie tells us next week is CAUSE FOR ALARM.   

Is he joking or what.    

I'd rather Eddie showed The Loretta Young film The Accused since it hasn't been on TCM in years and Cause For Alarm is shown more often.

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15 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Thanks , Moe, it was nice of you to provide that link.

However, the main point of what I was saying was,  how come there's no info about it on the TCM schedule page?  I was saying that,  given that there IS information about the film on various sites on the web,  it seemed odd that there wasn't a word about it on the TCM site.  And that led me to wonder who   (or what) exactly,  prepares that TCM schedule site?   That was the main thing I was writing about on the post you quoted from me.  I did find some info on Los Tallos Amargos on other sites, but nothing on TCM's.  That was what I was saying,   why not?

To be fair,  someone here  (sorry not to give credit but offhand I can't recall who     SEE   EDIT )  did say the source of information about the films on the TCM schedule is from the American Film Institute website,  so if they don't have anything on a movie, neither will the TCM site.    (  I think? )

EDIT:  It was Polly of the PreCodes who mentioned the AFI seems to be the source of  info for the TCM schedule page.  Thanks, Polly.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

copied and pasted from the wikipedia page on BODY HEAT:

Janet Maslin wrote that Body Heat was "skillfully, though slavishly, derived" from 1940s film noir classics; she stated that, "Mr. Hurt does a wonderful job of bringing Ned to life," but was not impressed by Turner's performance:

Sex is all-important to Body Heat, as its title may indicate. And beyond that there isn't much to move the story along or to draw these characters together. A great deal of the distance between [Ned and Matty] can be attributed to the performance of Miss Turner, who looks like the quintessential forties siren, but sounds like the soap-opera actress she is. Miss Turner keeps her chin high in the air, speaks in a perfect monotone, and never seems to move from the position in which Mr. Kasdan has left her.[14]

And that is why actors leave soap opera credits off their Playbill resumes. Cheap shot. Incidentally, Kathleen Turner was nominated for Best Newcomer by the Golden Globes, but lost to . . . get ready for it . . . Pia Zadora. This was the year that almost ended the Golden Globes. Body Heat received no Oscar nominations: nothing for William Hurt, Kathleen Turner, Lawrence Kasdan, or John Barry (music), let alone Best Picture.

The term "film noir" was little known by the general public in 1981. Some people would have noted the resemblance to Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice, but Body Heat was seen more as a star-making film for both William Hurt and Kathleen Turner, quintessential stars of the 1980s but, alas, no other decade. Unlike Chinatown, The Long Goodbye, and Night Moves, which also had endings that would have been unacceptable in the 1940s, Body Heat has no overlay of "This is what America is like." It's just a good story, well told and well acted.

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52 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

I'd rather Eddie showed The Loretta Young film The Accused since it hasn't been on TCM in years and Cause For Alarm is shown more often.

I get those two movies mixed up.

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4 minutes ago, kingrat said:

And that is why actors leave soap opera credits off their Playbill resumes. Cheap shot. Incidentally, Kathleen Turner was nominated for Best Newcomer by the Golden Globes, but lost to . . . get ready for it . . . Pia Zadora. This was the year that almost ended the Golden Globes. Body Heat received no Oscar nominations: nothing for William Hurt, Kathleen Turner, Lawrence Kasdan, or John Barry (music), let alone Best Picture.

The term "film noir" was little known by the general public in 1981. Some people would have noted the resemblance to Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice, but Body Heat was seen more as a star-making film for both William Hurt and Kathleen Turner, quintessential stars of the 1980s but, alas, no other decade. Unlike Chinatown, The Long Goodbye, and Night Moves, which also had endings that would have been unacceptable in the 1940s, Body Heat has no overlay of "This is what America is like." It's just a good story, well told and well acted.

(Just to be clear, I could not disagree more with what Maslin wrote about TURNER’s performance AND soap opera acting! )

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39 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I get those two movies mixed up.

CAUSE FOR ALARM! Is in the public domain, but honestly I like it a lot. It plays like an extra good extra long episode of “the Loretta Young show“

THE ACCUSED (1949) is a paramount film, so don’t expect to see it on TCM anytime soon. However, it can often be found online. I have seen it a couple of times on YouTube and while it is very interesting, it starts out quite well, it loses steam and becomes a real mess. It also has some of the worst uses of voiceover narration I can think of in a film.

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