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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Thanks, Lorna!  Never heard of that one.  Will check it out.

So I'm dozing late last night, wake up, and see that the t.v. screen isn't black anymore.  Has a picture.  Flickering, but a picture.   Then after about 20 minutes there is a "block" of black, but not all the way down.  It's as though the block is "hiding" the real picture, which is the movie or whatever I'm watching.   And on the bottom and sides those green vertical lines keep popping up.   They're all in it together, lol.   Still have sound.   I was able to "see" (with the flickering) those French Eric Rohmer films.   Good thing they are very talky.     All these weird "digital" thingies on my screen, it just doesn't really feel like the t.v. tube is ready to burn out or anything.   But it must be since my cable is working.   I have power.

Sorry to treat you or anyone else on here as some sort of repair person who can instantly tell me what the situation is with this crazy Samsung 32 inch set.  I talk to it in low, loving tones:  "Please, for Mommy, keep going...."

If this is an older tv with an actual picture tube, it sounds like the flyback transformer has gone bad. Not a difficult fix but I'm not sure what the cost would be these days.

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Wow, Citizen Ed, thank you for this information!  Being extremely low-tech as you no doubt can tell, I have never heard of a flyback transformer.   I keep referring to a picture "tube" but I'm old-school and still use that term even though it should be obvious to a dunce such as me that I don't have one -- it's a flat-screen Samsung (not wall-hung), very thin and with "legs" that I have on a stand. 

I looked up flyback transformer and my head is spinning.   I see articles on how to fix, replace and purchase.   I wonder if I could impose on my building's handyman (who usually takes care of the plumbing) to check all this out.  Perhaps he could even take care of the problem for a nominal fee.

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5 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Wow, Citizen Ed, thank you for this information!  Being extremely low-tech as you no doubt can tell, I have never heard of a flyback transformer.   I keep referring to a picture "tube" but I'm old-school and still use that term even though it should be obvious to a dunce such as me that I don't have one -- it's a flat-screen Samsung (not wall-hung), very thin and with "legs" that I have on a stand. 

I looked up flyback transformer and my head is spinning.   I see articles on how to fix, replace and purchase.   I wonder if I could impose on my building's handyman (who usually takes care of the plumbing) to check all this out.  Perhaps he could even take care of the problem for a nominal fee.

You're very welcome!

Unfortunately with a flat screen I don't think there's a flyback transformer any more so that's not your problem.  I got out of the electronics field while high definition flat screen, LCD/plasma TVs were still just catch phrases in sci-fi comics.

Sorry

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By Gad, sir, I do appreciate your input.   Now I'm thinking there really could be aliens inside my tv set, lol.   

Another day on the quest....

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, kingrat said:

Los tallos amargos seems pretty deep into gay subtext. The meeting at the bar is like a gay pickup. Liudas (Vassili Lambrinos) stares at Alfredo (Carlos Cores), and Alfredo can't look away. Although Alfredo has a girlfriend, he doesn't seem all that interested in her, and he is clearly obsessed by Liudas. In the later scene with Alfredo, Elena, and a younger man, any woman like Elena who's been around would assume that a man behaving like Alfredo is attracted to the younger man.

Yeah, I picked up on that too.  Not only did Alfredo feel betrayed by the “phony”  family story, what the real killer rage was about was the betrayal with the woman dancer.  But that angle was not overt and didn’t ruin things like Death In Venice with Dirk Bogarde.

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Once again I’ll put Patricia Highsmith’s name out there.  You know, this reminds you of that. That feels  the same as this.  It’s amazing how artists can leave such an indelible impression on you.  How did they do that?  I guess you are born an artist.  But here we are watching films made 65 years ago and I can’t find one dated thing about them.  You move to the 70’s and 80’s and then you feel a “dated” thing immediately.  I’m grateful for TCM and even more grateful that all I have to do is unplug my TV every morning then plug it back in, wait awhile, and then it’s okay.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Show him a little ankle and find out...

lol, he fixed my toilet a while back and didn't charge a fee.   

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1 minute ago, Thompson said:

Did he show his plumber cliche?  I bet you were looking.

My handyman actually resembles Dr. Fauci.

So, no, I didn't look, lol.

 

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For the most part I liked Los Tallos Amargos. Not great, but good enough. It usually makes things a 

bit more interesting if the story is set in another country where things are done a little differently.

The journalism scam was a little confusing. I'm guessing that they charged a lot for something that

cost very little, lessons made on a mimeograph machine. Could have made a lot of dough off something

like that, at least in the short run. And I give Alfredo credit for not falling for the rookie mistake of not

digging deep enough, the Shallow Grave Syndrome. Now if only he had been into botany he would

have realized that the plant only needed to be transplanted a little way in the ground. Instead he got

splatted by the train. That must have hurt like hell. Even without the Production Code the killer was

punished in the end. He did miss the rather embarrassing position of being the father-in-law to the

son whose father he had killed. Every cloud has a silver lining. 

 

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

For the most part I liked Los Tallos Amargos. Not great, but good enough. It usually makes things a 

bit more interesting if the story is set in another country where things are done a little differently.

The journalism scam was a little confusing. I'm guessing that they charged a lot for something that

cost very little, lessons made on a mimeograph machine. Could have made a lot of dough off something

like that, at least in the short run. And I give Alfredo credit for not falling for the rookie mistake of not

digging deep enough, the Shallow Grave Syndrome. Now if only he had been into botany he would

have realized that the plant only needed to be transplanted a little way in the ground. Instead he got

splatted by the train. That must have hurt like hell. Even without the Production Code the killer was

punished in the end. He did miss the rather embarrassing position of being the father-in-law to the

son whose father he had killed. Every cloud has a silver lining. 

 

Yeah, that part was ridiculous. Who would plant something that DEEP? Maybe a tree! LOL.

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3 hours ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, that part was ridiculous. Who would plant something that DEEP? Maybe a tree! LOL.

I believe that he wasn't thinking very straight at the time, due perhaps to feelings of guilt and paranoia,

and just runs off and commits suicide by train. The ending is pretty delicious when the audience learns

that the body wouldn't have been discovered anyway. A little reminiscent of many episodes of Alfred

Hitchcock Presents that had twist endings. 

 

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On now is this documentary called Visions of Eight.  Fascinating, a look at the 1972 summer Olympics through the eyes of movie directors.  

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43 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

She must be liquidated. 

Break out your DOUBLE INDEMNITY wig...

Goes without saying, but I think we should define "plumbing" first. 

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MR. RICCO (1975) is a decent '70s-style 'noir-ish' kind of movie.  It's not a great movie, but it's not a bad movie either.  It has that downbeat 1970s vibe to it + an interesting mystery.  (I thought it was an interesting mystery, anyway).  Had a good cast, too.  Think it's a 2.35:1 movie.  I mention the ratio because I've only seen "Mr. Ricco" on an UK MGM VHS tape which was panned-and-scanned -- but it *looks* like a 2.35:1 film and so if TCM ever shows "Mr. Ricco" I would expect it to be in W-I-D-E-S-C-R-E-E-N. 

I think MR. RICCO is worth at least 1 watch.   I've seen it thrice, btw. 

I've noted TCM airing "Night Moves" several times, but I honestly don't know if TCM has ever shown "Mr. Ricco".

HICKEY & BOGGS (1972) is also a complicated, downbeat mystery . . . I think it fits in quite well with the 'noir-ish' vibe.   

 

 

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5 hours ago, Vautrin said:

...He did miss the rather embarrassing position of being the father-in-law to the

son whose father he had killed. Every cloud has a silver lining. 

 

If I recall correctly, the young girl who falls in love with the kid was not Alfredo's daughter but was his younger sister.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

If I recall correctly, the young girl who falls in love with the kid was not Alfredo's daughter but was his younger sister.

 

 

 

 

You are correct. I must have had a minute of brain freeze. So then he would have been in the slightly less

embarrassing position of having murdered his brother-in-law's father. I had to laugh at how quickly his

sister whipped off her glasses when introduced to the son.  Zipppp.

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