Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I saw Cause for Alarm on YT a few years back. It's so much fun because Loretta plays a so

stereotypical middle-class suburban housewife going about her so stereotypical 1950s housewife

daily chores with Sullivan as the slightly less stereotypical psycho hubby. It's like watching an

episode of Leave It to Beaver where Ward turns out to be a killer. Maltin and Halliwell have the

running time at 74 minutes, which isn't exactly a big difference. 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Vautrin, what do you think of Donald Sutherland's performance in Klute (was he a boring detective).?  Frankly, if you can call her that, I found Faye Dunaway rather boring in  The Thomas Crown Affair; but, Kolchak (Darren McGavin) as a  newspaperman/detective and Steve McQueen in Bullet - they were interesting.  Didn't watch any of last night's neo-noir (except for a few moments of Night Moves) because I wasn't in the mood for a great deal of violence.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

in his book ALTERNATE OSCARS, author DANNY PEARY argues that JOHN HEARD should have won the 1981 BEST ACTOR OSCAR for CUTTER'S WAY. 

 

Not a bad point to make here, Lorna. Yes, Heard is terrific in this film.

However, if Mr. Peary in his book didn't also say the same sort of thing about Lisa Eichhorn's performance in this film, then he was remiss in this.

john-heard-and-lisa-eichhorn-in-cutter-s

(...and because I thought she was terrific in it too)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Faye Dunaway is terrible .  Who is Barton_Keyes?  Is he the moderator?  Why does he have that _ with his name?  Just watched The Misfits on TCM and nobody can tell me that Marilyn Monroe is an actress.  She stinks. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Not a bad point to make here, Lorna. Yes, Heard is terrific in this film.

However, if Mr. Peary in his book didn't also say the same sort of thing about Lisa Eichhorn's performance in this film, then he was remiss in this.

john-heard-and-lisa-eichhorn-in-cutter-s

(...and because I thought she was terrific in it too)

in the book ALTERNATE OSCARS, PEARY gives out his own alterna-awards for BEST ACTOR, ACTRESS, AND PICTURE, he doesn't do citations for SUPPORTING (I wish he did!)- which Eichhorn definitely was.  As I recall it though, he did think CUTTER'S WAY should have been nominated for BEST PICTURE, which is saying something because he was picky!

(I would consult my own copy OF ALTERNATE OSCARS for reference, but it FELL COMPLETELY APART a year ago!)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Vautrin, what do you think of Donald Sutherland's performance in Klute (was he a boring detective).?  Frankly, if you can call her that, I found Faye Dunaway rather boring in  The Thomas Crown Affair; but, Kolchak (Darren McGavin) as a  newspaperman/detective and Steve McQueen in Bullet - they were interesting.  Didn't watch any of last night's neo-noir (except for a few moments of Night Moves) because I wasn't in the mood for a great deal of violence.

I thought his character was boring but the situation he was put into is interesting, taking advantage of

his dullness. He's a rather taciturn shy straight arrow coming to the big city where's he's definitely out 

of place, which makes for a contrast. I thought Dunaway was fairly interesting in TTCA, but I've always

liked her in general. The others were interesting as was Jim Rockford, who had a lot of drama going on

outside of the cases he took. I don't mind some violence, especially fictional movie violence. I rarely watch

three movies in a row on TCM, but I did last night, except for the interrupted Blood Simple.

I give Mrs. Cutter a lot of credit for staying with Mr. Cutter, because I would have been out of there long

before. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

Maybe he's a hopeless landlubber.

He probably tripped over a pile of line falling into the bullet.

Eddie and Ben both must be landlubbers too, they also said he could be circling bleeding to death. They were all upset over Hackman's breach in sports etiquette stating the losing score before the winning, while they overlook the obvious life saving items always shipboard.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Moe Howard said:

He probably tripped over a pile of line falling into the bullet.

Eddie and Ben both must be landlubbers too, they also said he could be circling bleeding to death. They were all upset over Hackman's breach in sports etiquette stating the losing score before the winning, while they overlook the obvious life saving items always shipboard.

And which reminds me here...

While I've noticed many around here stating their dislike of having Ben sitting in with Eddie during these Neo-Noir wraparounds, I have to say I haven't felt this being that much of a negative. I sort of like having Ben there for Eddie to bounce ideas and the specs of these films off of, and in a way think their conversations as a nice little divergent manner in which to impart the specs of these films and instead of having Eddie talking directly to us and as he does on Noir Alley.

However and with being said, what HAS surprised me the most about this is that it seems Ben isn't as knowledgeable about films, and especially this genre of film, as I would've thought he might be.

(...in fact, I've gotten the idea and often feel that Eddie is pretty much "schooling" Ben on these films, and films I would've thought Ben would have had at least a passing knowledge of from his past and not as it sometimes seems that Eddie has assigned these films as "homework" for Ben to watch before their conversations commence)

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Dargo said:

And which reminds me here...

While I've noticed many around here stating their dislike of having Ben sitting in with Eddie during these Neo-Noir wraparounds, I have to say I haven't felt this being that much of a negative. I sort of like having Ben there for Eddie to bounce ideas and the specs of these films off of, and in a way think their conversations as a nice little divergent manner in which to impart the specs of these films and instead of having Eddie talking directly to us and as he does on Noir Alley.

However and with being said, what HAS surprised me the most about this is that it seems Ben isn't as knowledgeable about films, and especially this genre of film, as I would've thought he might be.

(...in fact, I've gotten the idea that Eddie is pretty much "schooling" Ben on these films, and films I would've thought Ben would have had at least a passing knowledge of from his past) 

Ben is two generations removed from his Hollywood relatives, if that's what you meant by his past.  He was born in Washington, D.C. , and started his career as a broadcast journalist.   His father was a politician and journalist.  His father was one of the people that influenced the decision to end the U.S.'s adoption of the metric system.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Ben is two generations removed from his Hollywood relatives, if that's what you meant by his past.  He was born in Washington, D.C. , and started his career as a broadcast journalist.   His father was a politician and journalist.  His father was one of the people that influenced the decision to end the U.S.'s adoption of the metric system.

Interesting. Didn't know about the metric system thing here, Tex.

So in other words, Frank was bright enough to realize that the average American would never be bright enough to understand it then, right?!

(...OR, "American Exceptionalism" at its "finest")

LOL

;)

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Dargo said:

And which reminds me here...

While I've noticed many around here stating their dislike of having Ben sitting in with Eddie during these Neo-Noir wraparounds, I have to say I haven't felt this being that much of a negative. I sort of like having Ben there for Eddie to bounce ideas and the specs of these films off of, and in a way think their conversations as a nice little divergent manner in which to impart the specs of these films and instead of having Eddie talking directly to us and as he does on Noir Alley.

However and with being said, what HAS surprised me the most about this is that it seems Ben isn't as knowledgeable about films, and especially this genre of film, as I would've thought he might be.

(...in fact, I've gotten the idea and often feel that Eddie is pretty much "schooling" Ben on these films, and films I would've thought Ben would have had at least a passing knowledge of from his past and not just because as it sometimes seems that Eddie has assigned these films as "homework" for Ben to watch before their conversations commence)

Dargo, you ever been on a boat that size without a radio? Or did I miss it getting shot out or something.

I like the banter between the two. I agree Eddie's the teacher, Ben is the reluctant student who makes some interesting contributions. He does seem to have a little bit of a 'tude about his family name, like he deserves extra credit because relatives did stuff.

It's all good though. I like them both and as these themes have gone, Neo-Noir Fridays blows the hell out of "problematic films" (that really aren't) or the God awful Astrology nonsense.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

And now for one MORE smart*** remark to follow and regarding this post of yours, Tex...

59 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Ben is two generations removed from his Hollywood relatives, if that's what you meant by his past.  He was born in Washington, D.C. , and started his career as a broadcast journalist.   His father was a politician and journalist.  His father was one of the people that influenced the decision to end the U.S.'s adoption of the metric system.

Well okay, sure. While Ben might not be as knowledgeable about movies as one might think he should be, as a counterweight to this, AT LEAST he's always had that beautiful, mellifluously resonant voice of his to fall back on, RIGHT???!!!

LOL

(...told ya it was gonna be another smart*** remark here, now didn't I?!)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Dargo, you ever been on a boat that size without a radio? Or did I miss it getting shot out or something.

I like the banter between the two. I agree Eddie's the teacher, Ben is the reluctant student who makes some interesting contributions. He does seem to have a little bit of a 'tude about his family name, like he deserves extra credit because relatives did stuff.

It's all good though. I like them both and as these themes have gone, Neo-Noir Fridays blows the hell out of "problematic films" (that really aren't) or the God awful Astrology nonsense.

Well said, and I absolutely agree with ya here, Moe.

(...and yes, you'd think a boat that size would have had a radio, wouldn't ya...wasn't it about the same size as the Santana was?...you know, the boat with the radio that Bogie used after he dispatched Eddie G. and his gang while returing to Key Largo)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Thompson said:

Faye Dunaway is terrible .  Who is Barton_Keyes?  Is he the moderator?  Why does he have that _ with his name?  Just watched The Misfits on TCM and nobody can tell me that Marilyn Monroe is an actress.  She stinks. 

I say that Marilyn Monroe is an actress. At least in this one she is. Anyone who wants to build a case that Marilyn stinks, there are no doubt other places where one may look to make a better case.

Your post above is exceeding peevish. Did you get up on the wrong side of the bed this morning? This one is terrible, that one stinks, and what's all this noise about someone's name? 

Breathe in through the nose and breathe out through the mouth. Maybe you'll feel better.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

He probably tripped over a pile of line falling into the bullet.

Eddie and Ben both must be landlubbers too, they also said he could be circling bleeding to death. They were all upset over Hackman's breach in sports etiquette stating the losing score before the winning, while they overlook the obvious life saving items always shipboard.

Private Investigator lesson number one--Be aware of your surroundings.

I would have nailed Delly's mom, the fading movie star. But then I'm a person of low moral character. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~LHWS~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laurence Harvey warning 2:15 high. Please have your blindfolds 

and earplugs ready. LAURENCE HARVEY WARNING!!!! 11:35.

 

This has been a test of the Laurence Harvey Warning system. If there

had been an actual Laurence Harvey appearance you would have been

directed to tune into your local LHWS station. This has only been a

test. We now resume our regular broadcasting schedule.

 

 

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

See the source image

in his book ALTERNATE OSCARS, author DANNY PEARY argues that JOHN HEARD should have won the 1981 BEST ACTOR OSCAR for CUTTER'S WAY. 

For the first hour, I wondered just what he was basing this on...and then came the scene where he and BRIDGES are watching THE POLO MATCH and he lets loose with some HARDCORE RENDING AND GNASHING, some TORTURED SOUL STUFF that in the hands of a lesser actor- say ROD STEIGER- would have been AWFUL, but HEARD makes it work.

 

John Heard's performance really is great, and I agree, imagining how Rod Steiger would have played the role underlines Heard's excellence. I'm not sure that Marlon Brando at his 1950s peak could have played this particular part as well. Heard doesn't seem to have approached the role as a Method actor would. Heard gets the physicality of Cutter perfectly, and he has the vocal control to deliver the literary lines Cutter enjoys throwing off from time to time. Then there's that heh-heh-heh laugh he uses so much in the first half of the film: from most actors, this would be a bit annoying or a bit false, and from other actors this would be excruciating. For me, Heard's laugh works. Although I can appreciate Henry Fonda getting a career Oscar for On Golden Pond, Fonda should have won an Oscar for The Grapes of Wrath in 1940, and Heard should have won in 1981.

Jeff Bridges is the perfect foil for Heard, and this is one of his best performances. Lisa Eichhorn's performance as the woman torn between the two men is largely a matter a perfect reactions, and this is the place to note that Ivan Passer and his cinematographer, Jordan Cronenweth, frame the shots of the conversations between the main characters perfectly. Appropriately, the characters are often in separate shots. Passer's direction of the actors is terrific; Jeff Bridges isn't at this level in Against All Odds, for instance.

By the way, I also love the scene at the pier where Cutter destroys the stuffed animal, another scene many actors could not manage.  I also agree about the overuse of coincidence, but Cutter does tell Bone that he knows where Cord is in the house.

The film is very much about different kinds of nihilism and self-destruction: Mo's drinking and unwillingness to leave Cutter; Cutter's outrageous acting out; Bone's deliberate lack of commitment to anyone or any principle; Georgie's acquiescence in working for the man he believes killed his mother; Cord's lack of moral principle. Bone and Cutter feel a deep need to rescue each other, each convinced that the other is in even worse shape than he is.

Among other things, doesn't Cutter's Way make the Bruce Dern part of Coming Home seem piddling? The Bruce Dern scenes show us an idea about PTSD, whereas John Heard's scenes give us an experience of PTSD.

 

 

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I like LAURENCE HARVEY I shall mention his last film:

WELCOME TO ARROW BEACH (1974).  He plays a Korean War veteran who may -- or may not -- have lost his taste for human flesh.  He starred and directed this early movie about the effects of 'PTSD' on returning soldiers.  Admittedly the plane crash flashbacks with him and his crew are •really• low-budget . . . Laurence didn't have a big pile of $dough$ at his disposal while making the movie +plus+ he was already fighting stomach cancer which killed him before the film could be released.  (Apparently he was endeavouring to edit "Welcome to Arrow Beach" from his deathbed; phoning in instructions before he died on Nov. 25, 1973).  

WHAT YOU GET:  As a viewer, if you are fortunate enough to see an un-cut version of "Welcome to Arrow Beach", you are treated to Lou Rawls singing a song with groovy lyrics like "We're all born to Die" over the opening and closing credits.  John Ireland standing up for 'Law and Order'.  A guy in a full-body cast waving his hand around because it's FUN!  And all kinds of other nuances like David Macklin reminding Meg Foster the places a girl could inject herself defy the imagination!  😲

***SPOILERS*** You also get Laurence carving up Gloria LeRoy in slow-motion for his 'meat rack' in the cellar.  She models; he /chops/! 

TCM CAN borrow my U.S. Magnetic Video Corporation VHS release from 1979 to make a DVD copy of "Arrow Beach" for airing on Turner Classic as long as they promise to return it.   :D Runs 99 minutes in its proper length; there seem to be some 85-minute versions out there which apparently reduce the cannibalism angle to nothing.  Boo!  Hiss!  on those shortened editions.  They're utterly worthless. 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

Since I like LAURENCE HARVEY I shall mention his last film:

WELCOME TO ARROW BEACH (1974).  He plays a Korean War veteran who may -- or may not -- have lost his taste for human flesh.  He starred and directed this early movie about the effects of 'PTSD' on returning soldiers.  Admittedly the plane crash flashbacks with him and his crew are •really• low-budget . . . Laurence didn't have a big pile of $dough$ at his disposal while making the movie +plus+ he was already fighting stomach cancer which killed him before the film could be released.  (Apparently he was endeavouring to edit "Welcome to Arrow Beach" from his deathbed; phoning in instructions before he died on Nov. 25, 1973).  

WHAT YOU GET:  As a viewer, if you are fortunate enough to see an un-cut version of "Welcome to Arrow Beach", you are treated to Lou Rawls singing a song with groovy lyrics like "We're all born to Die" over the opening and closing credits.  John Ireland standing up for 'Law and Order'.  A guy in a full-body cast waving his hand around because it's FUN!  And all kinds of other nuances like David Macklin reminding Meg Foster the places a girl could inject herself defy the imagination!  😲

***SPOILERS*** You also get Laurence carving up Gloria LeRoy in slow-motion for his 'meat rack' in the cellar.  She models; he /chops/! 

TCM CAN borrow my U.S. Magnetic Video Corporation VHS release from 1979 to make a DVD copy of "Arrow Beach" for airing on Turner Classic as long as they promise to return it.   :D Runs 99 minutes in its proper length; there seem to be some 85-minute versions out there which apparently reduce the cannibalism angle to nothing.  Boo!  Hiss!  on those shortened editions.  They're utterly worthless. 

WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK,

So i made it through NIGHT MOVES.

Some of you have expressed confusion at the ending, and I get you. I more or less "got" what happened, although I am worried that if I try to explain it, I will just confuse you more...

it helps if you play CHESS...

FROM THE IMDB TRIVIA SECTION FOR THE FILM:

The chess game on which the title of the film was based was a real game. The game was K. Emmrich (White) vs Bruno Moritz (Black), played in Bad Oeynhausen, Germany in 1922. In the film, we see the position after White's 26th move. As Moseby showed Paula, Black could have finished the game with a queen sacrifice followed by three knight checks, but he played something else and lost.

(end quote)

in CHESS, the KNIGHT is by far the most confounding, UNPREDICTABLE, elusive  piece you have (well, the TWO KNIGHTS you have) when i first started out playing, i would often kill my opponents KNIGHTS while sacrificing my own EARLY IN THE GAME because I just did not want to think about all the various moves a KNIGHT can pull on you. While all the other pieces in chess have to respect moving in LINEAR PATH, the KNIGHT moves in an L-SHAPED MANNER, it can SKIP OVER other figures on the board, it's almost like having a piece that CAN FLY. It also is capable of landing in a spot where it can make three or more of your most valuable pieces vulnerable, it's like holding a gun on someone's QUEEN, ROOK and KING and saying "pick one to die"- and the fun fact is, THEY HAVE TO LET THE ROOK OR THE QUEEN DIE BECAUSE YOU CAN'T SACRIFICE YOUR KING!!!!!!!!! also, later in the game, THE KNIGHT can PURSUE THE KING in an infinite amount of ways, CONSTANTLY PUTTING IT INTO CHECK NO MATTER WHERE IT TRIES TO RUN!!!!!!

long story short (too late) CHESS is evil and I highly recommend it as a way to relax.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Back to Noir Alley.

This is the second time I have seen Cause For Alarm and still not impressed with it.  Guess because I have a hard time with the Loretta Young role and/or her portrayal of it.  Also do not see it as Noir, but rather another 1950's drama.  After all, there is no crime in it, no criminals and so forth.  Just Barry Sullivan being paranoid.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff looks good in Cutter's Way, too, and John Getz' hairy chest is on display in Blood Simple. Getz also gets to show off his posterior. For Another World fans: John Getz is one of the good-looking, talented actors hired by Another World during the 70s (Harding Lemay era, when AW expanded to an hour) and then criminally underutilized. Imagine having John Getz, John Considine, David Ackroyd, and Leon Russom and not featuring them in major storylines.

This Neo-Noir spotlight is really outstanding. I'm going to have to rent the films I missed in the series. Again, I think it's important to emphasize that when these films were released, they were not called "Neo-Noir." No one would have thought of Cutter's Way and Body Heat as being of the same genre or same movement. Cutter's Way would have been seen as a Vietnam vet film.
 

 

Really, this neo-noir theme is

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...