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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Nice write-up,  Tom,  and nice praise for Zachary Scott.  He's an actor I used to be a bit dismissive of,  used to not like him that much.  Over the years,  and with further viewings of his work,  I've come to change my mind about him, and now respect him a lot more than I used to.  (Although I'll still never understand why he was presented as a "hot" male actor;  I may have changed my mind about his talent,  but not about his lack of charisma- at least,  for me.)

Not to nitpick,  and it kind of doesn't matter a whole lot,  but just to clarify:  you say  Scott's character in Guilty Bystander is trying to "get his kid back after being kidnapped".   Quite likely you  already knew, and meant,  Scott's character   thinks his child has been kidnapped.  Actually, as it turns out,  quite anti-climactically,  the little boy was never kidnapped and never in any danger.  The "where is my son,  is he in danger?"  thing is all just a McGuffin.

Truth is I found the story of Guilty Bystander as confusing as that in any noir. But I really didn't care. Was the kid not really kidnapped? I didn't remember that but thanks for clarifying it.  I primarily recall the film for it seedy atmosphere and Zachory Scott's performance, both of which I appreciated.

If you haven't seen Scott in either The Southerner or, to a lesser degree, The Unfaithful, I suggest you do if they become available, MissW. (The latter comes on TCM occasionally). They will only add to your appreciation of his skill as an actor. His male "hotness" is another issue.

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was raised an EPISCOPALIAN . . .

Me too. As my dear non-practicing Jewish mom used to say, Episcopals are Catholics without guilt. 

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1 hour ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

"A slick, respectable crime drama, I thought, even if it lacks the atmosphere, great visuals and memorable dramatics of the William Wyler production." 

I disagree, The Letter, was all studio back lot fake jungle. The other film has a lot of gritty, seedy Bunker Hill and Angels Flight.

The Unfaithful does make effective use of Bunker Hill and the Bradley Building but there's relatively little atmosphere to be found in the film with a posh LA suburban setting much of the time.

The Letter is clearly a studio made production but, with its sets and Tony Gaudio's stunning black and white photography remains, to me, a stunning illustration of the studio system at its best in its ability to create a "foreign" world of atmosphere and menace. Bette Davis' portrayal of sexual repression and hypocrisy shows that she effectively gave more to the screen when, on the surface, she tried less. And James Stephenson, his life to be soon cut tragically short, had the role of his career with his magnificently understated performance as Davis' lawyer increasingly wracked with moral and professional conflict as he gradually comes to realize he's defending a woman guilty of her charge.

There's nothing fake about the atmosphere of this memorable drama to me.

GIF the letter maudit bette davis - animated GIF on GIFER

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18 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

VERY WISE CHOICE.

Am sure they could look it up somehow, but who want's to deal with the hassle and harassment?

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

The Unfaithful does make effective use of Bunker Hill and the Bradley Building but there's relatively little atmosphere to be found in the film with a posh LA suburban setting much of the time.

The Letter is clearly a studio made production but, with its sets and Tony Gaudio's stunning black and white photography remains, to me, a stunning illustration of the studio system at its best in its ability to create a "foreign" world of atmosphere and menace. Bette Davis' portrayal of sexual repression and hypocrisy shows that she effectively gave more to the screen when, on the surface, she tried less. And James Stephenson, his life to be soon cut tragically short, had the role of his career with his magnificently understated performance as Davis' lawyer increasingly wracked with moral and professional conflict as he gradually comes to realize he's defending a woman guilty of her charge.

There's nothing fake about the atmosphere of this memorable drama to me.

GIF the letter maudit bette davis - animated GIF on GIFER

You couldn't very well expect them to shoot in a jungle somewhere! Bunker Hill, ok.

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55 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

That is the God's honest truth.

I grew up in the Catholic church just after Vatican II, and at least where I lived, it was not a guilt-trip at all.   The homilies (sermons) were never about sin, eternal damnation, or other similar topics.  My parents called it hippie church, because they were raised in the 30s and 40s under a very different church regime.

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My mother would occasionally say to me 'You'd try the patience of a saint,' and she wasn't even

Catholic. Later that got me to wondering if saints had differing amounts of patience. I was born

in the state of New Jersey and whatever one may think personally, big hair is no sin.

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2 hours ago, nakano said:

  The Southerner . He displayed his range,Zachary Scott gave a great performance,beautiful film.

There are a number of prints available on You Tube of The Southerner, but the one listed as HD quality is of really outstanding quality. Zachory Scott is wonderful in his role as a farmer. A complete contrast to his role in Mildred Pierce.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

You couldn't very well expect them to shoot in a jungle somewhere! Bunker Hill, ok.

No but those seedy locals are all long gone and I give extra points for that almost archival (now) footage.

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30 minutes ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

No but those seedy locals are all long gone and I give extra points for that almost archival (now) footage.

Yes, I know. But you could shoot there back then w/out too much trouble.

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4 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Me too. As my dear non-practicing Jewish mom used to say, Episcopals are Catholics without guilt. 

Because Episcopalians, unlike some Southern denominations, were not opposed to drinking alcohol (almost as great a sin as dancing, according to some fundamentalists), they were known as "Whiskeypalians."

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5 hours ago, Vautrin said:

My mother would occasionally say to me 'You'd try the patience of a saint,' and she wasn't even

Catholic. Later that got me to wondering if saints had differing amounts of patience. I was born

in the state of New Jersey and whatever one may think personally, big hair is no sin.

Uh-huh, and then there was MY mother's favorite "wet blanket" response to me:

"Yeah yeah, very funny. You should be on the stage. There's one leaving at 5 o'clock. Don't miss it."

(...we weren't a very religious family, you see)

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3 hours ago, kingrat said:

Because Episcopalians, unlike some Southern denominations, were not opposed to drinking alcohol (almost as great a sin as dancing, according to some fundamentalists), they were known as "Whiskeypalians."

How's that old joke go again? Oh yeah:

"Jews don't acknowledge Jesus Christ as the Son of God. Protestants don't acknowledge the Pope as the leader of Christianity. AND, Baptists don't acknowledge another Baptist inside a liquor store."

(...good one, ain't it)

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On 7/26/2021 at 1:37 PM, ElCid said:

Maybe next week he will reply and refute what he said.

I wouldn't count on it.  These are all taped in advance...  

 

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:

Uh-huh, and then there was MY mother's favorite "wet blanket" response to me:

"Yeah, yeah, very funny. You should be on the stage. There's one leaving at 5 o'clock. Don't miss it."

(...we weren't a very religious family, you see)

I can recall the time some kids were making a commotion of some kind outside our home and Mom opened the door to see what was happening. I don't recall any details except that one or two of them must have mouthed off to her. She responded, before shutting the door on them, by yelling, "Ah, your mother wears army boots!" They were stunned into silence, undoubtedly uncertain what she meant. There were probably a lot of quizzical expressions on their faces. There's an insult tucked away in there somewhere but what is it exactly?

Well, I just looked the expression up on the internet now and read that during WW2 prostitutes following troops around apparently wore combat boots. Therefore the expression is a way of calling someone's mother a hooker. I can't imagine, though, that Mom had a clue what the expression meant when she used it on those kids. She probably had enjoyed the sound of it and it just popped out of her mouth. I still think it's a pretty funny way of telling someone off, especially if, as would be the case with the vast majority of people, they have no idea what the heck the expression means.

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I can recall the time some kids were making a commotion of some kind outside our home and Mom opened the door to see what was happening. I don't recall any details except that one or two of them must have mouthed off to her. She responded, before shutting the door on them, by yelling, "Ah, your mother wears army boots!" They were stunned into silence, undoubtedly uncertain of what she meant. There were probably a lot of quizzical expressions on their faces. There's an insult tucked away in there somewhere but what is it exactly?

Well, I just looked the expression up on the internet now and read that during WW2 prostitutes following troops around apparently wore combat boots. Therefore the expression is a way of calling someone's mother a hooker. I can't imagine, though, that Mom had a clue what the expression meant when she used it on those kids. She probably had enjoyed the sound of it and it just popped out of her mouth. I still think it's a pretty funny way of telling someone off, especially if, as would be the case with the vast majority of people, they have no idea what the heck it means.

Back in the deep recesses of my mind, I think I recall that very line also once being said by Bugs Bunny to another character who had bugged him.

(...btw, I've never before heard this particular etymology ascribed to that expression, but I suppose it does kind'a make sense...maybe)

 

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On 7/27/2021 at 10:27 PM, Dargo said:

Back in the deep recesses of my mind, I think I recall that very line also once being said by Bugs Bunny to another character who had bugged him.

(...btw, I've never before heard this particular etymology ascribed to that expression, but I suppose it does kind'a make sense...maybe)

 

Maybe Mom got the line from Bugs. She always had a lot of affection for that wascally wabbit.

Bugs Bunny, greatest banned player ever | U.S.S. Mariner

"Ah, yer mother wears army boots!"

 

Yeh, I can kinda imagine it coming out of Bugs' mouth myself.

 

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

Uh-huh, and then there was MY mother's favorite "wet blanket" response to me:

"Yeah yeah, very funny. You should be on the stage. There's one leaving at 5 o'clock. Don't miss it."

(...we weren't a very religious family, you see)

That remark could stunt a young lad's future comedic career. Of course I've heard that one before,

but it's still kind of funny. 

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10 hours ago, Hibi said:

Some places now offer to e-mail your receipt. I ALWAYS ask for a paper copy so I have it with me!

Some places want to SPAM you through email, using an enticement to lighten your pocket load of a negligibly-weighted piece of paper.

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11 hours ago, kingrat said:

Because Episcopalians, unlike some Southern denominations, were not opposed to drinking alcohol (almost as great a sin as dancing, according to some fundamentalists), they were known as "Whiskeypalians."

I will never forget when I lived in Los Angeles I was talking to a guy at the Abbey in West Hollywood, he was a college graduate who had a job at a major talent agency if I recall. I mentioned to him that I was raised an Episcopalian and he looked at me, scrunched up his nose and said “Is that some kind of cult or something?” And without missing a beat I replied “yes, and we hold our pagan gatherings at country clubs and golf courses across the nation.”

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If TCM decides to do  one Neo-Noir Friday evening once a month-i hope they will do(minus Ben may I suggest).The Grifters should be presented. I watched it again  ,i saw it first run in 1990 but never since. Last week everything was fresh-except i always remembered Annette Bening was showing everything(This is the movie that 'convinced' Warren Beatty of her talents to offer her a role,he was friendly with Anjelica Huston).Back to the movie ,directed by Stephen Frears  produced by Martin Scorsese. Anjelica Huston gives her best performance   i prefer this one than her performance in The Dead. John Cusack is also very good in it-it does not happen often in his case. A great movie.

 

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Regarding suggested future showings in the neo-noir genre, here's a couple I'd love to see presented on TCM in such a series:

The-Last-Seduction-Poster.jpg

You'll never see a more ruthless and amoral femme fatale than Linda Fiorentino's here.

And...

p14960_p_v10_aa.jpg

In true classic noir fashion, the plot has more twists and turns than you can shake a Colt 1911 at.

(...haven't seen 'em in years either, but I still remember being highly impressed and entertained by both)

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