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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

 

Yes, that would've been the smarter option. If it had been a one night stand he would have never given her his phone number. So it was obvious (to me) they had been seeing each other from time to time.....and since Sterling was so sure he was the father, probably the only man she had been seeing for the last couple months.

I thought Sterling looked really beautiful in this film. And I thought I saw her nipples showing in that one dress. (which I hadnt noticed before, I've seen the film a few times...)

Lots of men must be thankful for DNA nowadays. When the guy found that skeleton

hand sticking out of the sand, I thought William Castle might be somewhere around.

Yeah, I saw this on YT maybe five of six months ago. Always nice to see it on a TV.

I didn't notice Jan's nipples showing. Could be, kind of hard to tell without looking for

them, though the dress was somewhat sheer or maybe I'm just getting old. There is

also an actress named Jan Shepard who appeared on a lot of TV shows. They do look

a little alike. (Funny, they allow nipples but not the four letter shortened version.

Okayyy.)

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On ‎4‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 10:03 AM, Hibi said:

 

I meant in Suddenly!

1954's only 77 minute "Suddenly) (***1/2-out of 4 stars)-(like the even superior M-G-M/CinemAScope) "BLACK ROCK" easily should been a wee-but longer at just 81 minutes.) & I'll always say this until my dying day my #2 idol & hero *SINATRA in my view delivers his all-time-(out of 58 flix) outright & thougherly dispicale villain-(something other singing starts wouldn't have touched with a ten foot pole during that era) & was absolutely robbed of then his 2nd *Academy Award nomination-(YOU BE THE JUDGE & PLEASE FEEL TO CAST YOUR ON VIEWPOINT AS WELL:

Official leading actor contenders 1954 *Oscars>(WO SHOULDA' BEEN BUMPED?)>(*-always denotes *Academy victory)

Humphrey Bogart, "Caine Mutiny"

*Brando as Terry Malloy in *Waterfront"-(LIKE BLOW-OUT!) & you folks recall when he literally ran down the aisle?) 

Bing Crosby, "Countrey Girl"

Dan 0'Herlihy, "Robinson Crusoe on Mars"-(THIS EASILY WOULDA BEEN HIS SLOT IF I WERE A VOTING MEMBER

& James Mason, "A Star is Born"

 

I OFTEN POST THIS JAZZ-(some *Francis Albert lingo, but not a lot ever replies?)

(ALSO-RANS): Spencer Tracy in "Broken Lance"

 

 

 

 

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On 4/15/2018 at 3:26 AM, cmovieviewer said:

Some comments on Mystery Street as shown tonight on Noir Alley (* spoilers ahead *)

 - The connection between the accused and the victim with her pregnancy as a factor in the motive seems dubious to me, since they had only been seen together on one day and his phone number would not be present in her address book.
...
 - At the end of the film I was expecting the detective to also notice the phone number on the wall at the boarding house to ultimately bring things to a close.  Of course, finding the claim ticket instead leads to a much more dramatic finish at the baggage office followed by the chase through the train yard.
- Why do people think they are safe in trying to blackmail murderers?  What could possibly go wrong?

Good points, all of them, cmovieviewer. I thought of all those things too.But I bolded the ones you made that really struck me.

I, too, thought that it was significant that the accused guy's name was not in Vivian's little black book. That in itself would not prove his innocence , but you'd think it would go some way towards at least giving the detectives an idea of the possibility that he might  not be guilty.

However, I can see why they still made a connection between the two: there were witnesses testifying that they saw Henry Shanway leaving the bar with Vivian the last time she was seen alive.

Your comment about the phone number on the wall was exactly along the same lines I was thinking...I kept waiting for Lieutenant Morales to see it there - it drove me crazy, waiting for him to notice it, especially as I think at least twice he uses that very phone, the same phone Vivian used the night she called her erstwhile lover (and soon-to-be murderer), with the killer's phone number jotted down on the wall right beside where Morales was speaking ! ! Of course director Sturges must have done the non-observance of the damning phone number on purpose, to make us all go "Look ! Ricardo, look at that phone number! Right there on the wall next to that strange flowery wall paper ! !"

And yes, the missing of the phone number on the wall was somewhat compensated by the fact that Morales noticed the fateful baggage ticket in the bird cage - - a nicely suspenseful scene, since he nearly missed that too.

As for what you said about blackmailers thinking they can safely be alone with the ones they are trying to blackmail - at least if the blackmailing is about murder - I've often thought that. I can't remember how many movies I've seen where the would-be blackmailer, blissfully demanding a huge amount of money from someone they know is a murderer, is promptly murdered in turn by the furious blackmailee (is there such a word as "blackmailee"?) By the way, when the murderer- a nasty piece of goods, "respected for hundreds of years" or no - - asks that venal landlady "Do you know the penalty for blackmail?" I wanted her to reply "Do you know the penalty for murder?"

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On 4/15/2018 at 6:10 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Actually, believe it or not, I WAS IN CHURCH!

(seriously!) 

 

Aw, I think that's kind of sweet, Lorna. Although I suppose I had some idea, if I were to think about it at all, that you don't usually attend church, at least not on Sunday mornings, since I've been under the impression that you watch a lot of Eddy's noirs in real time - on Sunday morning.

While we're on the topic of church-going: I do not frequent any place of worship, but my husband, born and raised a Catholic, attends Mass every Sunday morning without fail. He does mind missing Noir Alley, although this is now somewhat alleviated by the new Saturday night screening time. Anyway, what I wanted to say was, the Roman Catholic Church, at least here in Ontario, offers several masses, including a Saturday afternoon one, for those who might want to sleep in (or watch Noir Alley). Not that I care, but it's always struck me as somewhat cheating somehow, going to mass on Saturday when it's supposed to be Sunday. However, I am not familiar enough with the finer points of Christian theology to dispute the matter. Plus, I don't really care.

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Back to "Mystery Street".

A fun movie by any name smells as sweet - noir, procedural, drama - whatever you call it, "Mystery Street" is well-made, well-done, and thoroughly enjoyable. I remember the first time I saw it (I think yesterday was the 4th time around), I loved it - and that was on a sketchy old cheapo video that was a pretty bad copy. 

So, "Mystery Street" is one of those noirs ( or quasi-noirs, whatever) that I would cite if I were to ever start that thread I mentioned a long time ago, a thread about how many noirs are funny, some of them are almost comedies. I know many will vigourously disagree with me, but I can't help it, there are quite a few noirs that make me laugh, and "Mystery Street" is one of them.

I mean, look at that crazy landlady ! Oh, Elsa Lanchester, thank you for your many delicious and hilarious performances, any movie you are in is automatically more entertaining. Elsa's greedy, sneaky, ever-dissembling Mrs. Smerrling  ("Mrs. Smerrling" ? ! What kind of a name is that?) is a treat to watch. In a way, she steals every scene she's in, and almost the entire movie. You gotta love her blatant unashamed hypocrisy; she's always presenting herself as a respectable morally pure citizen, when in fact she's so greedy and dishonest and scheming, it's almost endearing.  Just one example of how funny Elsa makes her: When Vivian's murderer comes to Mrs. Smerrling's parlour (I want to call it a parlour) to retrieve his gun, he asks her if her husband lives there, too. "Not exactly", Mrs. Smerrling purrs. So then he asks her if she's even married, and she again purrs back, "Not exactly". There's something about the way she says "Not exactly" twice like that, that's just hilarious. I vote this character into the Top Twenty Noir Hall of Fame Most Memorable Characters (a non-existent Hall of Fame at this point, but still....)

Another really fun bit in this film: Detective Morales goes to interview a funeral parlour director ( is that what they were called back then?) whose name appeared in the little black book.  The guy is so pious, butter wouldn't melt in his mouth. And there's this funereal organ music playing in the background ! Really ? !  The actor who plays this character makes the most of his five minutes; he fairly reeks of hypocrisy and self-interest .Plus, when he finds out Vivian has died, he actually asks, "Will there be any need for services?" or some such question. Hey, when you find out your former B-girl has "passed on", why not see if you can make a little money out of her passing?

Other things I love about "Mystery Street" : Jan Sterling's trampy but somehow likable "toe dancer". Too bad she's only around for the first twenty minutes or so - I can always use a few more minutes of Jan Sterling, an exceptionally pretty and talented actress who always kicks azz in everything she's been in. And she's not afraid to play trashy characters ( look at "Ace in the Hole"). 

And how 'bout those weird Harvard Medical School scenes? That bit where they're matching up faces to the skeleton head is eerie, to say the least. I do have to wonder, though, if a body tossed into the bushes on a beach would be so completely stripped of any, uh, decomposing matter, in just three months. I don't know how long it takes for a dead body to become a skeleton, just a set of bones, but I was surprised that poor Vivian's body had become just that in 12 weeks or so. Maybe - - yuck ! -- her bones had been picked clean by wild beach creatures. Oh well, it's a detail that doesn't really matter.

There are loads of other fun details about "Mystery Street", but I'll just wind up by saying the final chase scene on the railway tracks is satisfyingly exciting. I always say, you can't go wrong with train track scenes, especially in film noir (or even "procedurals".)

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For a pretty long time now, my father and I have been in the usher pool at our church, we walk the plate around, hold doors open, hand out programs, and stand there during communion in case someone falls (thank God no one has on our watch at least.) it's about 5 or 6 times a year, no big.

it's an Episcopal church (aka Caffeine-free Catholic-Lite), which is actually the oldest in NC** lots of prominent townfolk and my family have been going for a while and I know a lot of the people and there's a pretty Spoon Rivery thing going on with a lot of the tales there, which has served as an inspiration for me.

it's a tradition and in many ways i am a traditional person.

it does actually dovetail wonderfully with my 1st time viewing of THE WICKER MAN (1973) on the preceeding Friday, a film that is all about tradition and religion. (SEE: I JUST WATCHED post(s) from me for more on that if u want)

 

 

**there's one that claims it's older, but we serve eyebrow at this suggestion

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14 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Aw, I think that's kind of sweet, Lorna. Although I suppose I had some idea, if I were to think about it at all, that you don't usually attend church, at least not on Sunday mornings, since I've been under the impression that you watch a lot of Eddy's noirs in real time - on Sunday morning.

While we're on the topic of church-going: I do not frequent any place of worship, but my husband, born and raised a Catholic, attends Mass every Sunday morning without fail. He does mind missing Noir Alley, although this is now somewhat alleviated by the new Saturday night screening time. Anyway, what I wanted to say was, the Roman Catholic Church, at least here in Ontario, offers several masses, including a Saturday afternoon one, for those who might want to sleep in (or watch Noir Alley). Not that I care, but it's always struck me as somewhat cheating somehow, going to mass on Saturday when it's supposed to be Sunday. However, I am not familiar enough with the finer points of Christian theology to dispute the matter. Plus, I don't really care.

Yes, my mother's church has Sat. masses as well. Except the Sat before Easter for some reason. They've been doing that for decades.....

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Yes, my mother's church has Sat. masses as well. Except the Sat before Easter for some reason. They've been doing that for decades.....

Saturday Mass was instituted as an acceptable form for Catholics to meet their Sunday obligation, after the Vatican 2 Council of 1965.  That's when Latin was basically eliminated from the liturgy in favor of each parish's preferred  language in an attempt to bolster attendance at churches world-wide and make the services more relevant to those who went.

My parish used to have Sunday morning services at 6:30, 8, and 10.  If I felt like it, I'd go to the 6:30 Mass when I was in high school.  There were only about 15-20 people there (on a good day), and the service lasted about 25 minutes!  The priest at the time eventually got rid of that early service and moved it to 7:00 on Saturday evening.  It was more popular with younger Catholics who could go to Mass, then hit the town and sleep in on Sunday with no worries!

Currently, my parish has Mass at 4:00 on Saturday and 10:00 on Sunday.  As for Easter Vigil services, they can be held on Saturday, but if they are, they must begin after sundown (for that one day only).  This year, the Vigil service was held at 8 p.m.

Sorry for the tangent on the thread.  Back to Noir Alley...

I loved Mystery Street; have seen it several times.  Ricardo Montalban and Elsa Lanchester were very good in it.

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Yes, that sounds right. I could never understand Sat. mass as it seemed like cheating. How can you go on Sat and make it count for Sunday? Makes no difference to me now, as I dont go to Church!

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

What was that other noir where Elsa met a bad end? I've forgotten.

I wish I knew. Despite my being an Elsa fan, I haven't seen nearly as many of her films as I'd like.

I do know she was in "The Big Clock", where she played another of her hilarious quirky characters. In "TBC" she's an eccentric artist, who plays some kind of key role in Ray Milland's quest to establish his innocence. She's not in this film nearly as much as she's in "Mystery Street". but she makes the most of the time she does appear in it.

However, I don't believe she comes to a bad end in "The Big Clock". Which, by the way, I'd love it if Eddie decided to show on Noir Alley.

Also, speaking of Elsa Lanchester, I'm down for her being Star of the Month some time.

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I wish I knew. Despite my being an Elsa fan, I haven't seen nearly as many of her films as I'd like.

I do know she was in "The Big Clock", where she played another of her hilarious quirky characters. In "TBC" she's an eccentric artist, who plays some kind of key role in Ray Milland's quest to establish his innocence. She's not in this film nearly as much as she's in "Mystery Street". but she makes the most of the time she does appear in it.

However, I don't believe she comes to a bad end in "The Big Clock". Which, by the way, I'd love it if Eddie decided to show on Noir Alley.

Also, speaking of Elsa Lanchester, I'm down for her being Star of the Month some time.

Oh, that's right. Maybe that's the film I'm thinking of. Yes, she doesnt meet a bad end in that. I'll have to check her filmography. I thought there was another film.....

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I would like to alert Noir Alley fans to a somewhat special showing coming up this weekend on Apr 21 & 22, namely the film Cry Danger (1951).  I first became aware of Cry Danger when it was shown on TCM during the primetime hours back on January 17, 2013.  The theme for that evening was “Noir City” and featured films selected by Eddie Muller, who was co-host for the introductions along with host Robert Osborne.  Cry Danger was the first film shown that night, and was featured because it had recently been restored by the Film Noir Foundation that Eddie is associated with.  (The restored film had first been shown in public at the TCM Film Festival the year before.)

To my knowledge the restored version of Cry Danger has not been shown on TCM since that night in January 2013, so this is a relatively rare opportunity to catch it again.

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3 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

I would like to alert Noir Alley fans to a somewhat special showing coming up this weeked on Apr 21 & 22, namely the film Cry Danger (1951).  I first became aware of Cry Danger when it was shown on TCM during the primetime hours back on January 17, 2013.  The theme for that evening was “Noir City” and featured films selected by Eddie Muller, who was co-host for the introductions along with host Robert Osborne.  Cry Danger was the first film shown that night, and was featured because it had recently been restored by the Film Noir Foundation that Eddie is associated with.  (The restored film had first been shown in public at the TCM Film Festival the year before.)

To my knowledge the restored version of Cry Danger has not been shown on TCM since that night in January 2013, so this is a relatively rare opportunity to catch it again.

Appreciate the recommendation, cmovieviewer. I'd already planned on recording Cry Danger, as it's the first Noir Alley presentation that I haven't already seen and/or already own a copy of.

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