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17 hours ago, Thompson said:

Sinatra boors me down to the bone.  Now I have to admit that one with Laurence Harvey and Angela Lansbury was good.  Sinatra playing these army guys is ridiculous because he’s so little, what a 28 inch waist?  Most of the time he looks like a cartoon to me. I think Tony Bennett is a good singer, Frank does nothing for me. And isn’t that what it’s all about?  You say tomato and I say something else.  Ray Milland was not a drinker but he portrayed probably the best true alcoholic in The Lost Weekend that exists on film.  He does this with a sense of rhythm.  Why do you like a particular song?  What sets it ahead of other songs?  It’s the rhythm, but it’s subtle, like singing or playing behind the beat, on beat, but behind it.  The Man With the Golden Arm has none of that magic going on.  It is dull.  Gene Hackman as Popeye Doyle knows how to play the junkie way way better.  He’s got a sense of rhythm about him.  Elvis Presley did too, but he couldn’t act his way out of a burlap bag.  Now I’m confused as to where I was going with this — oh yeah,  “we are all a prisoner of our own perspective.”

...and to sum up...

AAAUUUUGH !!!!!

,,,

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16 hours ago, Dargo said:

;)

Eeh! You no fool ME! There'a AIN'T no Sanity Clause!

I know, if there were, at least 2/3 of us would be barred from posting here.

ps- WILL YOU SLACKERS AT TCM EVER GET THE FIRTUTUDE TO SHOW “HOT SPELL”? What do you animals have against Shirley Booth?!?!?!

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1 hour ago, 37kitties said:

Dean was definitely the better actor. Helluva lot funnier too.

Well,  as I posted in some detail a page or so back,   Sinatra was unquestionably the better singer.  So if you want to give Deano a higher actor rating,  sure,  if that's what you think   ( Sinatra was in  better movies, though. Put that in your Martini glass and smoke it.)

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9 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well,  as I posted in some detail a page or so back,   Sinatra was unquestionably the better singer.  So if you want to give Deano a higher actor rating,  sure,  if that's what you think   ( Sinatra was in  better movies, though. Put that in your Martini glass and smoke it.)

Would it be okay if I toked it instead?

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On 8/3/2021 at 6:54 PM, laffite said:

The idea of "sense of rhythm" as it pertains to acting is interesting. Is that synonymous with "sense of timing."???? Or do you mean something perhaps a little different. This is not a jab or a joke, just curious.

 

I only grasp at straws.  But yes, it’s  like a singer who is good at phrasing but is not really under the  rhythm of the song.  Johnny Cash was a master at getting under the song.  I think some actors in certain roles act with rhythm not so much timing.  Great example is Jack Nicholson in Cuckoos Nest.  Sterling Hayden and Robert Mitchum seem to do that in a lot of their films.  I guess it’s like missW says, “to each his own, it’s all unknown, if dogs run free, why can’t we, across the field of time?”

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1 hour ago, Thompson said:

I only grasp at straws.  But yes, it’s  like a singer who is good at phrasing but is not really under the  rhythm of the song.  Johnny Cash was a master at getting under the song.  I think some actors in certain roles act with rhythm not so much timing.  Great example is Jack Nicholson in Cuckoos Nest.  Sterling Hayden and Robert Mitchum seem to do that in a lot of their films.  I guess it’s like missW says, “to each his own, it’s all unknown, if dogs run free, why can’t we, across the field of time?”

Well, let's hope  "the best is always yet to come".   Just do your thing,  and (maybe)  you'll be king.

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9 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Sinatra was unquestionably the better singer

Not according to my grandfather. He was a former cop and the sight of Sinatra on the TV was enough for him to launch into the always predictable "He's a crook! A gangster! All mobbed up! The guy can't sing a note and should be locked away!"

I'll rest now because I'm certain my grandfather has posthumously convinced you to shun all things Sinatra. 

I wonder where I can find Lady in Cement . . . . 

HEY! lucky me, it's on the youtube.

 

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1 hour ago, Moe Howard said:

Not according to my grandfather. He was a former cop and the sight of Sinatra on the TV was enough for him to launch into the always predictable "He's a crook! A gangster! All mobbed up! The guy can't sing a note and should be locked away!"

I'll rest now because I'm certain my grandfather has posthumously convinced you to shun all things Sinatra. 

 

 

Well,  I have no trouble separating the art from the artist. Of course I've heard the rumours that Sinatra had Mafia connections, that he was, if not a gangster himself,  at the very least  on friendly terms with them.

Baby,  I don't care.   His mob associations have nothing to do with his music.  I won't attempt to argue posthumously with you r grandfather about Frank's unsavoury friendships with gangsters,  but tell your grandpa beyond the grave that the man could sing.  Possibly the best singer of the 20th century.   I've already written a post about this a page or two back on this thread, not going to do it again here.

ps:  I'm currently watching "The Sopranos".   For harrowing Mafia mob violence,  I've never seen anything like it.  and I've seen a lot.

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I started watching FAREWELL MY LOVELY but couldn't get into it -- fell asleep about a half hour in, which was astounding to me because I'm a Mitchum fan and appreciate MURDER MY SWEET.   Bob frankly looked bored and tired.   Sylvia Miles was the only one in my limited viewing time who added any spark.

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33 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I started watching FAREWELL MY LOVELY but couldn't get into it -- fell asleep about a half hour in, which was astounding to me because I'm a Mitchum fan and appreciate MURDER MY SWEET.   Bob frankly looked bored and tired.   Sylvia Miles was the only one in my limited viewing time who added any spark.

I've watched this one a couple of times myself and you're right, Bronxie. Mitchum looked not only "bored and tired" but by 1975 was too old to then play Marlowe at age 58, and of which he looked every bit of if not older.

And while watching it those two times, I also thought how lucky Dick Powell was that in 1944, Mitchum would still be a relatively unknown actor for a couple more years and so Powell, who I do believe is excellent in the '44 version, would get the part for which Mitchum was really born to play.

(...but once again, when he was 30 years younger...or heck, even say 15 years younger)

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44 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

I'm currently watching "The Sopranos"

EXCELLANT! Season 2 Episode one. Frank Sinatra's "It Was a Very Good Year". 

Where are you in the series.

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Yes, Mitchum would no doubt have truly defined the role in 1944.

I'm going to check out THE BRASHER DOUBLOON on YouTube.   Can't imagine George Montgomery as Philip Marlowe...

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The post Hays (Motion Picture Production) Code and pre PC "code" version of Raymond Chandler's "Farewell My Lovely" is probably the closest version to the novel we are going to see, it's firing on all cylinders. It pulls no punches, it's serious, dialog wise, doing justice to the novel.

In the previously adapted for film 1944 version Murder, My Sweet, Dick Powell was great as wisecracking Marlowe, he's pretty much as I pictured him in my mind's eye as I read the book. Mitchum at 58 years, in this film, is just a tad too old to fit the Marlowe of the novel. He's also a tad too iconic, Mitchum is playing Mitchum playing Marlowe, but the script reflects at least this age difference, he's written as an older wiser Marlowe, a weary character who realizes he's over the hump and sort of coasting. This small change becomes very believable as Mitchum settles into the part. He's still the knight of streets but now he creaks and is just a bit more tarnished.

 

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PS. There is no tacked love story like in Murder My Sweet, no blinding gun flash, no mention of the gambling ship anchored off Lido. 

The real revelation in Farewell My Lovely is Jack O'Halloran's Moose Malloy, in Farewell My Lovely  version Moose actually becomes more than a cartoon bad guy. You really feel sorry for the big lug and the torch he carries for his lost hooker girlfriend. Moose doesn't care that Velma fingered him for the job and took off with the loot. He just wants to be back in that sweet spot. O'Halloran gives off a Laird Cregar vibe, if we had been in a full blown Noir revival both Jack and Sylvia Miles would have been two of the major new stars, out of this cast only Harry Dean Stanton went on to really make a name in Neo Noir.

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10 minutes ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

PS. There is no tacked love story like in Murder My Sweet, no blinding gun flash, no mention of the gambling ship anchored off Lido. 

The real revelation in Farewell My Lovely is Jack O'Halloran's Moose Malloy, in Farewell My Lovely  version Moose actually becomes more than a cartoon bad guy. You really feel sorry for the big lug and the torch he carries for his lost hooker girlfriend. Moose doesn't care that Velma fingered him for the job and took off with the loot. He just wants to be back in that sweet spot. O'Halloran gives off a Laird Cregar vibe, if we had been in a full blown Noir revival both Jack and Sylvia Miles would have been two of the major new stars, out of this cast only Harry Dean Stanton went on to really make a name in Neo Noir.

Yep CJ, I was going to mention O'Halloran's performance in the remake and after Bronxie said she thought Sylvia Miles was the only one with any "spark" in the film.

(...good point)

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14 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I might try to watch the entire film online at TCM's site.

Can't imagine Charlotte Rampling being better than Claire Trevor.

Nope, Bronxie, I think you'll find  Charlotte Rampling (or as I've always thought of her: "The 1970s Lauren Bacall") isn't going be as good as Claire Trevor.

(...but then again, and as much as I've always liked Lauren Bacall, I've never thought she was as good an actress as Claire Trevor was either)

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Yeah, I'm sure Mitchum's age caused the screenwriter to have that first scene where Bob is looking

out the window and saying that he is tired and older. Got it. I've never been bothered too much by

the fact that Mitchum is much too old to be playing Marlowe as he appears in the novel. The movie

is so good that it really doesn't factor in all that much. I always get a kick out of the subplot of Marlowe

following DiMaggio's 1941 hitting streak, especially since the novel was published in 1940. Sylvia Miles

was pretty sexy as the middle aged alkie. For those who like just skin and bones, there's Charlotte Rampling,

who is hot in her own s&b way. This is one of the best adaptations of a Chandler book, including those from

the 1940s.

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9 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I might try to watch the entire film [FAREWELL, MY LOVELY (1975)]online at TCM's site.

Can't imagine Charlotte Rampling being better than Claire Trevor.

It’s also on Peacock, the NBC Streaming service. 
 

I really, really like the 1975 version of “farewell my lovely”, but it’s something of an acquired taste that needs to be seen more than once. At first sight, the last act is something of a letdown and Mitchum seems deflated, but the more you watch it the more it (and MITCHUM)- grows on you. And the score is great, as are the supporting performances, as is the Production design, which at that time in the mid 70s was able to utilize some vintage locales. 

there is something that feels very real about FAREWELL MY LOVELY (1975)

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There is something special about films set in the 1940s that were made in the 1970s, There’s just an understanding  and appreciation of the time that isn’t present in many 40s-set  films that were made in the 80s 90s and today.

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10 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I might try to watch the entire film online at TCM's site.

Can't imagine Charlotte Rampling being better than Claire Trevor.

Rampling is not better than Trevor (few actress of any era can do noir better than Trevor),  but that isn't a reason not to watch Farewell,  My Lovely.

 

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16 minutes ago, 37kitties said:

But Inherit the Wind was not a throw-off - it was an A picture.

Abbott and Costello meet Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde? Saturday matinee fodder.

And infinitely more honest about what it is. 

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1 minute ago, LuckyDan said:

And infinitely more honest about what it is. 

You didn't like that dramatization of the Scopes trial, huh?

Not sure how accurate a representation of the real trial it was, but it seemed fairly entertaining for the time in which it was made.

I wonder what they'd do with it if they made it now.

 

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