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59 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I'm saying that in the 44 version the character of Moose,  as written and directed,  was fairly one-dimensional.    In the 70s version,  as well as the novel,  the Moose character has more dimensions.      I'm not saying Mazurki was a one-dimensional actor. 

 

   

Maybe, but somehow I've always felt a liitle more sorry for Moose and how he ends up when Muzuki played him than I do when O'Halloran played him.

 

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Just now, Dargo said:

Maybe, but somehow I've always felt a liitle more sorry for Moose and how he ends up when Muzuki played him than I did when O'Halloran played him.

 

This lady doesn't feel you should  feel even a little sorry for Moose.

Esther Howard - Movies, Age & Biography

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5 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

This lady doesn't feel you should  feel even a little sorry for Moose.

Esther Howard - Movies, Age & Biography

f2e3df449b6314d5c7184cc194b7f592.jpg

                                 "Well that's 'cause sometimes I just don't know my own strength!"

;)

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Missing Noir Alley this month.  Seems like they could keel the regular programming going while TCM does these monthly themes- under the stars, month of oscars, etc.  Maybe this was why they doubled up last month with the neo noir saturdays.  sure this comment has already been made.

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On 8/12/2021 at 8:53 PM, Dargo said:

So James. Are you saying big Mike Mazurki here was "one-dimensional" as Moose in the '44 version?

(...a bit confused here with the last couple of postings in this baby)

I have to confess, I like the Robert Mitchum version a lot better than the 44 film. Mitchum just oozes coolness no matter what role he plays.

Not that the 1944 film doesn't have its good points. I always felt sorry for Moose no matter who played him.

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7 minutes ago, Thompson said:

What’s with the slow down?  Where is missWonderful?  Where is Drago?   Kittens hasn’t come out to play.  Let’s get with it!

This site has been crashing and throwing me out often today.     Maybe that has something do to with any "slow down"?

 

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23 minutes ago, Thompson said:

Yeah, well maybe, but this month without Noir Alley takes a toll on the psyche. 

I agree, it totally stinks. 

I admit I only throw my 2 cents in here whenever there's a particular film noir that I'm interested in, but the discussions are always fascinating.

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5 hours ago, Thompson said:

What’s with the slow down?  Where is missWonderful?  Where is Drago?   Kittens hasn’t come out to play.  Let’s get with it!

I am not missWonderful [sic] hardly , nor Drago [sic], nor have seen any kittens ...

... but how about a brief Cause for Alarm redux .

Simply, I like the way Loretta says, "Resigned?" She is so haggard at this point, she knows not what. Look at the way she escapes the room and throws herself against the wall. This scene with the loquacious aunt is my fave of the whole movie.

No biggie, just a quick look back ...

https://youtu.be/yNanUBPrSW0

 

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I liked Cause for Alarm and have come to appreciate those short hour plus films.  They can pack more in and there's no time to get bored.

Looking forward to Gloria Grahame day and am set to record her first Blond Fever at 3:00 am.

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13 hours ago, Katie_G said:

I liked Cause for Alarm and have come to appreciate those short hour plus films.  They can pack more in and there's no time to get bored.

Looking forward to Gloria Grahame day and am set to record her first Blond Fever at 3:00 am.

A 1944 comedy with Grahame and Mary Astor;   Never seen this film.  These two were not known for comedy,  per se.       (Astor was very funny in The Palm Beach Story done two years before).

 

 

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It was an enjoyable bit of comedy and I thought Gloria did a great job for her first film.  Cute as heck.  Mary's always a delight as well.

Now I'm getting ready to enjoy a full night of noir at its best.   Woo hoo!

Edited by Katie_G
Removing attachment. Not working because it's been quoted.
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1 hour ago, Katie_G said:

It was an enjoyable bit of comedy and I thought Gloria did a great job for her first film.  Cute as heck.  Mary's always a delight as well.

grahame1.jpg.8d9fb47db6c902577492c877d52752d8.jpg

 

Now I'm getting ready to enjoy a full night of noir at its best.   Woo hoo!

Funny that the poster has Grahame with the tag line:  She's gorgeous,  She's dangerous. 

I guess they knew that all the way back in 1944!

 

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1 hour ago, Thompson said:

Well Glenn Ford once again is clumsy acting in Human Desire .  Fritz Lang, why would he want Glenn Ford?  The railroad opening was brilliant, but it has quickly gone down hill. 

This is a Columbia film and Glenn Ford was their #1 star under contract at the time.    I.e. Lang,  an independent,   was asked if he wished to direct a Glenn Ford film.

I do agree that Ford is not at his best in Human Desire (clumsy acting is a good description).     Lang and Ford would reteam on The Big Heat and that collaboration was a lot more effective.      (still Human Desire does have it moments,  especially when Crawford and Grahame are on the screen). 

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4 minutes ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

The Big Heat I think you mean (James)

 

 

I made the correction:   Where in the sam did I get the big "team"????    Oh, well to ensure this reply isn't a total waste I offer this:

The Big Heat 1953, directed by Fritz Lang | Film review

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33 minutes ago, Cigarjoe cellph said:

It's even more impressive in the original version

Yes,  but are the trains authentic?      I ask since based on your knowledge of trains in NY in another noir,  Crack-Up,   the question is right up your alley;    Noir alley that is!

 

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