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45 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Do you mean that by the time Joe runs into Betty and Artie in the drug-store,  Betty has fallen in love with Joe?     I guess that is the case;   Betty does treat Artie kind of poorly when he makes some jokes about Joe and his fancy cloths and being a keep man.

As for why Joe gave Betty the brush off:   That is a very sympathetic view of Joe.     I can see it,  but I don't fully buy it.     

Can't believe you can't recognize that Joe is actually being noble, yes James, noble, when he has Betty come out to 10086 Sunset Blvd to see how he lives.

Everything about it, the way the script is written and the way Holden plays it, points to this.

(...and why the death of Joe especially hits hard, as by the thought that basically Joe was a decent guy at heart who didn't deserve his fate) 

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42 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Can't believe you can't recognize that Joe is actually being noble, yes James, noble, when he has Betty come out to 10086 Sunset Blvd to see how he lives.

Everything about it, the way the script is written and the way Holden plays it, points to this.

(...and why the death of Joe especially hits hard, as by the thought that basically Joe was a decent guy at heart who didn't deserve his fate) 

I agree Joe was being noble when he has Betty come to the home,   but I'm not so sure he was being noble when he gave her the brush-off in the drug-store.

 

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23 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

What is "politically centric"  ?  I've never heard that expression before.  Maybe it's an American thing.  Or maybe a jamesjazzguitar thing.  ?  Has it a similar meaning to " eccentric"  ??

Well, where most people would describe Colbert's humor as "political", he's decided to call it "politically centric".

What? You don't think that makes him sound sound lots smarter?

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42 minutes ago, 37kitties said:

Well, where most people would describe Colbert's humor as "political", he's decided to call it "politically centric".

What? You don't think that makes him sound sound lots smarter?

Exactly! Language inflation strikes again.

People who add the word "centric" to a noun or adjective or adverb are so much smarter than people who don't.

People with "skill sets" are so much more talented than those who merely have "skills."

"Maintenance workers" get so much less dirty than "janitors."

There are no homeless people, let alone "bums." They are "persons temporarily experiencing homelessness." Yes, bureaucrats actually say that these days. Though I haven't seen it in print yet, I'm expecting "ex-cons" to become "persons formerly experiencing incarceration."

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8 hours ago, King Rat said:

Exactly! Language inflation strikes again.

People who add the word "centric" to a noun or adjective or adverb are so much smarter than people who don't.

People with "skill sets" are so much more talented than those who merely have "skills."

"Maintenance workers" get so much less dirty than "janitors."

There are no homeless people, let alone "bums." They are "persons temporarily experiencing homelessness." Yes, bureaucrats actually say that these days. Though I haven't seen it in print yet, I'm expecting "ex-cons" to become "persons formerly experiencing incarceration."

Reminds me of my favorite line from the late Mitch Hedberg:

” I used to take drugs. I still do, but I used to too”.

Ironically, he died of a drug overdose.

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I agree Joe was being noble when he has Betty come to the home,   but I'm not so sure he was being noble when he gave her the brush-off in the drug-store.

 

I have to wonder how much  you're paying attention when you watch these films.  How much you get ( or don't get) if it isn't overtly spelt out for you.

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Next week on Noir Alley is Drive a Crooked Road.      Odd that the poster say "a new" Rooney;     He had made two other noir\crime films before this one:  Quicksand and The Strip.

 

Drive a Crooked Road (1954) | OldMoviesaregreat

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To add insult to injury, when Gillis took Betty to Norma's manse, he should have said something like

"Honey we spend more on liquor in a month than you do on rent for the entire year." That would have

sent her out of there posthaste, and back to Artie. I can see why she picked Joe over Artie and his

stale jokes. Artie should have quit his assistant director's job, got a buzz cut and joined the LAPD.

I watched one of the Harold Lloyd shorts last night and in it was a woman who had the same type of

weird cigarette holder that Norma had. Maybe they were a thing back in the 1920s.

 

By my calculations from a day or two ago, the Blue Jays are fifth in the AL wild card race. They do

have time to get a wild card berth but it won't be easy. I hope they make it as it would sad if they

became embittered Eastern Division vets, alienated from the post-season society around them,

down on their luck types, prey to chance with a dark cloud hanging over them.

 

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28 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Next week on Noir Alley is Drive a Crooked Road.      Odd that the poster say "a new" Rooney;     He had made two other noir\crime films before this one:  Quicksand and The Strip.

 

Drive a Crooked Road (1954) | OldMoviesaregreat

I think I have seen this one and will probably watch it again.  Not a fan or Rooney, but think he does OK in this one and similar.

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17 minutes ago, ElCid said:

I think I have seen this one and will probably watch it again.  Not a fan or Rooney, but think he does OK in this one and similar.

It is worth seeing.    I like Kevin McCarthy and Jack Kelly as the bad guys.    

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

To add insult to injury, when Gillis took Betty to Norma's manse, he should have said something like

"Honey we spend more on liquor in a month than you do on rent for the entire year." That would have

sent her out of there posthaste, and back to Artie. I can see why she picked Joe over Artie and his

stale jokes. Artie should have quit his assistant director's job, got a buzz cut and joined the LAPD.

I watched one of the Harold Lloyd shorts last night and in it was a woman who had the same type of

weird cigarette holder that Norma had. Maybe they were a thing back in the 1920s.

 

By my calculations from a day or two ago, the Blue Jays are fifth in the AL wild card race. They do

have time to get a wild card berth but it won't be easy. I hope they make it as it would sad if they

became embittered Eastern Division vets, alienated from the post-season society around them,

down on their luck types, prey to chance with a dark cloud hanging over them.

 

Well,  I'm not holding my breath about the Jays.   But they have come close to at least the Pennant Race a few times,  and it would be sweet to see them get at least that far.  And lest we forget,  although it was decades ago now,  yes,  the Blue Jays did win the World Series two years in a row.

For sure,  cigarette holders were popular,  mostly with women,  in the 1920s.  And hey,  if you're sporting a bobbed haircut and one of those drop- waist dresses,  a cigarette holder can look quite sophisticated as an accessory.  

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Next week on Noir Alley is Drive a Crooked Road.      Odd that the poster say "a new" Rooney;     He had made two other noir\crime films before this one:  Quicksand and The Strip.

 

Drive a Crooked Road (1954) | OldMoviesaregreat

The female lead in Drive a Crooked Road,  Dianne Foster,  was in another noir,  I think maybe Eddie showed it earlier this year  ( or sometime last year ?) :  The Brothers Rico.  But in that one,  she just plays a supportive wife to Richard Conte.  She must have had more fun playing the femme fatale in Drive a Crooked Road.

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13 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

For sure,  cigarette holders were popular,  mostly with women,  in the 1920s.  And hey,  if you're sporting a bobbed haircut and one of those drop- waist dresses,  a cigarette holder can look quite sophisticated as an accessory.  

Helps keep the yellow off the fingers too.

Back when I was addicted, I never used a holder (I'm too masculine) - but once a week I'd soak my fingers in a cup of Javex for a couple of minutes to clear away the stains.

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I enjoyed Cloudburst, which moved at a brisk pace and was executed with the customary efficiency by the Exclusive Films Ltd. production team. I'm not really keen on revenge movies. But, the filmmakers' comparatively restrained handling of the "vigilante justice" theme made Cloudburst more palatable to me. Indeed, a highlight in the story (for me) was when John Graham (Robert Preston) poignantly expressed his desire and need to be regarded as the son -- not son-in-law -- of his wife's mother -- a quite moving scene, IMO.

During his introduction, Eddie Muller mentioned Cloudburst featured familiar Hammer regulars. Most prominently among the regulars was barrel-bellied George Woodbridge (not to be confused with the MAD Magazine cartoonist) as "Sergeant Ritchie" and Harold Lang* as "Mickie Fraser ("Kid Python")". Comely Elizabeth Sellars** appeared in only two Hammer movies: Cloudburst and The Mummy's Shroud. As has been reported, Cloudburst was Hammer's first movie shot at Bray Studios. Coincidentally, The Mummy's Shroud was the last Hammer movie to be shot at Bray.

Behind the camera, Francis Searle was Exclusive's top director who would helm several of its "B" movies during the 1950s. Assistant director James (Jimmy) Sangster would later achieve fame and immortality as the screenwriter of several of Hammer's landmark horror films, becoming one of the prime architects of the company's success and linchpins establishing its legacy. As would makeup artist Phil Leakey, also among the credits in Cloudburst.

All in all, a stellar combination of talent that, for me, made Cloudburst satisfying entertainment. I eagerly look forward to seeing more Exclusive/Hammer noir thrillers on TCM***.

* A memorable victim in Hammer's The Quatermass Xperiment.

** Looking like Martin Stephens' mother . . . or older sister.

*** In another cyberspace forum devoted to movies, a Film Noir Foundation representative asked forum members if they would be interested in a boxed set of Hammer Film Noir thrillers. Yes, please!

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10 hours ago, King Rat said:

Exactly! Language inflation strikes again.

People who add the word "centric" to a noun or adjective or adverb are so much smarter than people who don't.

People with "skill sets" are so much more talented than those who merely have "skills."

"Maintenance workers" get so much less dirty than "janitors."

There are no homeless people, let alone "bums." They are "persons temporarily experiencing homelessness." Yes, bureaucrats actually say that these days. Though I haven't seen it in print yet, I'm expecting "ex-cons" to become "persons formerly experiencing incarceration."

True, but THEN here King Rat, there's the FLIP SIDE of this so-called "Language inflation" of which you speak.

Uh-huh, I'm talkin' about those out there who LACK a damn vocabulary past a junior high school level, and which is something, a strong vocabulary that is, that's an absolute necessity in order to express an opinion or thought to its fullest, clearest and most comprehensive. AND, which is something, the LACK of a vocubulary that is, that defined a certain individual who I will now NOT name.

(...BUT who I WILL now say Stephen Colbert, and considering his name was brought up earlier here, spent four-plus years mocking, AND to be honest here, I LOVED almost each and every damn time that he DID!)

 

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OKAY then. And NOW where the hell were we in this "Noir" thread, anyway? Oh yeah...

8 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I agree Joe was being noble when he has Betty come to the home,   but I'm not so sure he was being noble when he gave her the brush-off in the drug-store.

 

No, Joe wasn't being "noble" there, James. What he was being was secretive to Betty about the circumstances of his life at the time.

However, and once again, when the chips were down and after the sparks had kindled between Joe and Betty, he did the honorable thing by being brutally honest with her about those circumstances, and all the while knowing that it meant he would lose her.

(...ya know, he COULD have just strung her along a lot longer, don't ya?!)

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22 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I realize some of my posts here are coming a bit late,  as in,  many days after the posts I'm responding to.  But I'm just catching up and trying to read all the posts from the last 3 weeks.

Anyway:   I love baseball.  I never used to,  I used to think it was boring.  But that was before I knew better,  You have to understand a little bit about the game before you can appreciate it,  but once you do,  you realize it's very elegant,  almost mathematically beautiful,  and quite exciting.  Plus,  I love the way the pitchers stare at the catcher to get the signs before they pitch.   

By the way,  the Blue Jays are up for the Wild Card spot in the finals,  I hope they get it.  They beat the Oakland Athletics 3 times this week.  ( ! )

I heard a baseball player yesterday trying to explain the game, a young guy, a pitcher no less, anyway this is what he said - “ Baseball is a very simple game.  It is also a very very hard game.”

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1 minute ago, Thompson said:

I heard a baseball player yesterday trying to explain the game, a young guy, a pitcher no less, anyway this is what he said - “ Baseball is a very simple game.  It is also a very very hard game.”

So, this baseball player said "very" simple and "very very" hard, and NOT "berry" simple and/or "berry berry" hard, right Thompson?!

Well then I assume it wasn't THIS guy you saw then, RIGHT?!...

DwBRjPSU0AAmnfI.jpg

(...nor retired Red Sox great David Ortiz, for that matter)

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I'm looking forward to next week's Noir Alley. I've never seen Mickey Rooney in a noir film. BTW; I saw a clip of Ben Mankowitz explaining the "refresh". He said not to worry. They are still going to show classic movies. So, I'm fine with the new graphics and the new sets.  

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well,  I'm not holding my breath about the Jays.   But they have come close to at least the Pennant Race a few times,  and it would be sweet to see them get at least that far.  And lest we forget,  although it was decades ago now,  yes,  the Blue Jays did win the World Series two years in a row.

For sure,  cigarette holders were popular,  mostly with women,  in the 1920s.  And hey,  if you're sporting a bobbed haircut and one of those drop- waist dresses,  a cigarette holder can look quite sophisticated as an accessory.  

Yeah, I forgot they won the World Series. Two in a row is a rare accomplishment. I'll go with anyone but the

Yankees or the Red Sox. Can't stand either one of them. 

I didn't mean those elegant cigarette holders, but the one that Norma had, the one that was hooked around

one finger and then had a vertical thin piece of metal with the ciggy attached to the end. I had never seen

that anywhere else until I saw one in the Harold Lloyd short. Until then I thought it was just Norma being Norma.

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19 hours ago, Dargo said:

OKAY then. And NOW where the hell were we in this "Noir" thread, anyway? Oh yeah...

No, Joe wasn't being "noble" there, James. What he was being was secretive to Betty about the circumstances of his life at the time.

However, and once again, when the chips were down and after the sparks had kindled between Joe and Betty, he did the honorable thing by being brutally honest with her about those circumstances, and all the while knowing that it meant he would lose her.

(...ya know, he COULD have just strung her along a lot longer, don't ya?!)

We have a common understanding.     Joe did turn-it-around in that he really started to think about others and the impact his actions had on others,  but sadly for him,  it was too late to save him from doom.

 

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13 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

I'm looking forward to next week's Noir Alley. I've never seen Mickey Rooney in a noir film. BTW; I saw a clip of Ben Mankowitz explaining the "refresh". He said not to worry. They are still going to show classic movies. So, I'm fine with the new graphics and the new sets.  

The Strip is my favorite Rooney noir.    Rooney gets to play drums and the film features jazz  music.     Quicksand is a good one with Peter Lorre.

Drive a Crooked Road has it moments.

 

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The Strip is my favorite Rooney noir.    Rooney gets to play drums and the film features jazz  music.     Quicksand is a good one with Peter Lorre.

Drive a Crooked Road has it moments.

 

The Strip is the least noir-ish of the three though.  I'd rate Quicksand and Drive a Crooked Road about equal

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