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19 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

For sure,  cigarette holders were popular,  mostly with women,  in the 1920s.  And hey,  if you're sporting a bobbed haircut and one of those drop- waist dresses,  a cigarette holder can look quite sophisticated as an accessory.  

My mother used one often in the 50's and 60's - maybe earlier.

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1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

The Strip is the least noir-ish of the three though.  I'd rate Quicksand and Drive a Crooked Road about equal

I agree with that;  Like I said I like The Strip mostly because of the jazz angle.    It is an MGM film and that is a double-edge sword in terms of being noir-ish:   MGM "noir" films have higher production values but are not very gritty and often lack noir visuals (as is the case with The Strip).   

The Strip features L.A.'s Sunset  strip but does not use it to its full advantage.

 The film is set against the backdrop of Hollywood's Sunset Strip, with Louis Armstrong, Earl Hines and Jack Teagarden appearing as themselves in the film. Pete Rugolo, who is credited with Leo Arnaud with the film's orchestrations, was a well-known jazz arranger.

Much of the picture was shot on location in and around the Sunset Strip. Interiors were shot at popular nightclubs Mocambo and Ciro's and at restaurants Little Hungary and Stripps.

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On 9/6/2021 at 9:45 AM, Katie_G said:

Robert Preston was very good in Cloudburst,    ....... it could have been a bit more exciting. 

 

 

It could have been more exciting if he'd  burst out,    "...and that starts with "C", and that rhymes with "T",  and that stands for "TROUBLE "  !   "
 

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I agree with that;  Like I said I like The Strip mostly because of the jazz angle.    It is an MGM film and that is a double-edge sword in terms of being noir-ish:   MGM "noir" films have higher production values but are not very gritty and often lack noir visuals (as is the case with The Strip).   

The Strip features L.A.'s Sunset  strip but does not use it to its full advantage.

 The film is set against the backdrop of Hollywood's Sunset Strip, with Louis Armstrong, Earl Hines and Jack Teagarden appearing as themselves in the film. Pete Rugolo, who is credited with Leo Arnaud with the film's orchestrations, was a well-known jazz arranger.

Much of the picture was shot on location in and around the Sunset Strip. Interiors were shot at popular nightclubs Mocambo and Ciro's and at restaurants Little Hungary and Stripps.

AND not to mention, James Craig is actually GOOD in this one! ;)

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20 minutes ago, Dargo said:

AND not to mention, James Craig is actually GOOD in this one! ;)

Yes,  we have discussed this before (which explains the wink to others):   James Craig give a good performance.   But he wasn't so good towards  the Mickey.

The Strip (1951) László Kardos, Mickey Rooney, Sally Forrest, William  Demarest, Crime, Drama, Film-Noir, Musical | RareFilm

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On 9/6/2021 at 8:46 PM, Hoganman1 said:

I'm looking forward to next week's Noir Alley. I've never seen Mickey Rooney in a noir film. BTW; I saw a clip of Ben Mankowitz explaining the "refresh". He said not to worry. They are still going to show classic movies. So, I'm fine with the new graphics and the new sets.  

Mickey Rooney was just super in that boxing movie with Jackie Gleason and Anthony Quinn, the name of the movie escapes me, but Rooney (and Gleason) were really really good.  Quinn was a little off, he overplayed his role I thought, but Rooney was not the kid at the swimming pool trying to make dates with sorority girls.  After seeing that movie I never thought the same about him.  He’s a legitimate noir actor for sure.  What the heck is the name of that film?  If it’s not considered a noir it should be

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On 9/5/2021 at 12:32 PM, King Rat said:

Cloudburst was a fine addition to Noir Alley. Eddie pointed out a major plot hole in his outro. I particularly enjoyed the codebreaker background. Robert Preston, as usual, is a solid actor who can carry a film whenever he has a leading role. Elizabeth Sellars was terrific as Preston's wife, as smart and fascinating as she was lovely. Not the usual noir. All in all, a well-made film of the right length.

Well I watched the film last night and I  liked it What caught my eyes at the end was the name of Stanley Baker.He is the next to last name in the credits as 'the milkman', One of his first film credit.I like Baker so I fast forwarded the film twice: no Baker you needed to be a code breaker to find him!  I checked everybody every vehicle..nothing.So I checked with IMDB.  The UK release is 92 minutes vs the 83 minutes version we saw. Big difference ..Stanley and the plot holes are in these 9 minutes.,I  guess Eddie did not know himself otherwise he would have not mention the plot holes in the film.10% of the film is missing.I always watched his intros and outros like many people here even if i have previously seen the film showed,He has more time to research them and more time to present them, Well nobody is perfect and he does a great job overall.At least with him we are certain not to hear the Leonard Maltin's film book of reviews(which i like),The book is abused by the evening host during the week I.E. lack of time in the intro is also a lack of time for research.

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Late to the discussion. I liked the film, (Cloudburst) though at first I thought it was going to be dud. Thankfully after the first boring part (10 mins). It took off in a different direction and was very engaging. SO GLAD Noir Alley is back!!!

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9 hours ago, Thompson said:

Mickey Rooney was just super in that boxing movie with Jackie Gleason and Anthony Quinn, the name of the movie escapes me, but Rooney (and Gleason) were really really good.  Quinn was a little off, he overplayed his role I thought, but Rooney was not the kid at the swimming pool trying to make dates with sorority girls.  After seeing that movie I never thought the same about him.  He’s a legitimate noir actor for sure.  What the heck is the name of that film?  If it’s not considered a noir it should be

Requiem for a Heavyweight  (1962):

Requiem For A Heavyweight: The Haunting Tale Of Mountain RiveraThe Fight  City

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Drive a Crooked Road — I’m looking forward to this one too.  Mickey Rooney, 8 years younger than he was in Requiem, if that makes any difference.  Never seen it, never heard of it, e.g., no prejudice.  I’m rooting for him though.

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On 9/8/2021 at 10:31 AM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Requiem for a Heavyweight  (1962):

Requiem For A Heavyweight: The Haunting Tale Of Mountain RiveraThe Fight  City

REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT is definitely worth watching.

I thought everyone did a good job, from Anthony Quinn to even Mickey Rooney (who isn't exactly my top 10 of best actors). As with THE HUSTLER, Jackie Gleason further strayed away from his Ralph Kramden image and prove he could be a dang fine dramatic actor. Julie Harris was just fine as well.

I heard the TV version was even better, though I've never seen that one. I think it had Jack Palance in Quinn's role. Would be interesting to see how he did in the part.

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11 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

REQUIEM FOR A HEAVYWEIGHT is definitely worth watching.

I thought everyone did a good job, from Anthony Quinn to even Mickey Rooney (who isn't exactly my top 10 of best actors). As with THE HUSTLER, Jackie Gleason further strayed away from his Ralph Kramden image and prove he could be a dang fine dramatic actor. Julie Harris was just fine as well.

I heard the TV version was even better, though I've never seen that one. I think it had Jack Palance in Quinn's role. Would be interesting to see how he did in the part.

Jack Palance is intense.  Rod Serling was involved too, and he is hands down the best cigarette smoker ever.  Drive a Crooked Road was disappointing.

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In every Ed McBain (Evan Hunter) crime novel (around 100 of ‘em) there is mention of October 15.  Why?  It’s his birthday of course.  Eddie Muller, I just discovered, has that same birthday.  Great minds, great names, same birthdays, I’m telling ya, don’t be going south on us Eddie, we won’t have it!

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2 minutes ago, Thompson said:

In every Ed McBain (Evan Hunter) crime novel (around 100 of ‘em) there is mention of October 15.  Why?  It’s his birthday of course.  Eddie Muller, I just discovered, has that same birthday.  Great minds, great names, same birthdays, I’m telling ya, don’t be going south on us Eddie, we won’t have it!

Eddie is going south on us on 10\23 when he shows La bestia debe morir  - The Beast Must Die (1952).

 

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Just to say i heard the new 'intro' for Noir Alley again I,.I'am not happy,They removed the original intro,removing the uniqueness of the segment,it was replaced by a generic intro  good for ANYTHING...I will check Silent Sundays as the previous one was not as good as the one 2 years ago but i will check what it is tonight. I do not like  much in the new look in general sorry.

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10 minutes ago, nakano said:

Just to say i heard the new 'intro' for Noir Alley again I,.I'am not happy,They removed the original intro,removing the uniqueness of the segment,it was replaced by a generic intro  good for ANYTHING...I will check Silent Sundays as the previous one was not as good as the one 2 years ago but i will check what it is tonight. I do not like  much in the new look in general sorry.

Yeah, nakano, I couldn’t put my finger on that before, something was wrong.  Why would TCM take that “classic” intro off?  Maybe that’s why Eddie looked under the weather.  Something is going on and I don’t like it either.  Please report on Silent Sunday intro. I noticed that the Australian gal that follows Noir Alley looked off too.

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I actually liked DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD. I haven't seen many of Rooney's movies, but I thought he gave a good performance  as a lonely naïve average Joe with big dreams. It was predictable. However Kelly and McCarthy were both great as villains and Dianne Foster was the perfect, though reluctant; femme fatale. It won't make my top twenty even though it was entertaining. 

I too, miss the old intro. It kind of set the mood for Eddie's comments and what is usually a dark movie.

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So, no comments yet on Drive a Crooked Mile?  

As for the new intro, it is pretty bad.  They are joining in with those pushing graphics as a substitute for reality.  I don't buy it.  The old intro was totally appropriate for Noir Alley as it is about classic film noir, e.g. older movies.  Trash the new intro  TCM, please.

As for Drive a Crooked Mile, I thought it was fairly good, but a little slow in the first half or so.  Mickey Rooney did pretty good job in his role, though nothing great.  

Had a girlfriend in high school who drove a Hillman Minx.  Her father was a mechanic at a Ford dealership and probably got a deal on it.  Don't know how many times it died on her somewhere.   Interesting that the garage in the movie specialized in foreign cars.  If it had been set in the South, it would be American cars and the racers and mechanics would be ex-moonshine haulers.

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Eddie was right -- Dianne Foster really looked and sounded like Rita Hayworth in DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD, so her appearance sort of dovetails appropriately in a nostalgically noir way with Columbia's tony production values (along with that haunting, modern score) and her role as femme fatale; unfortunately this lushness doesn't mesh with the "low-budget" air of the particular story and Rooney's schlemiel-like character.  

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Another no vote for the intros/bumpers.  Especially bad for Noir Alley.  Those bright colors and silly techno muzak would go great with Adventures of Malibu Barbie however.

Thoroughly enjoyed Drive a Crooked Mile. My experience with Mickey Rooney is limited to his Andy Hardy stuff and very little of that, so his portrayal of this unassuming, mild mannered mechanic is quite refreshing. It all worked with the possible exception of someone of Dianne Foster's looks making a play for scarface Rooney. She was trying too hard, but on the other hand, maybe she had to in order to crack Rooney's naive shell. 

The Southern Cal import shop was pure eye candy. MG, Porsche, Jag, all the primary food groups were represented. Then the familiar beach rental, it's still there.

QEPvFKy.jpg

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Foster I thought was false.  She started out all right in her beach outfits, but she fizzled out in her later outfits.  Also there was something with her facial expressions that bugged me, like she had sneaked a Zanax to top off her Valiums, and didn’t know up from down.  Nice legs, sure, but there were shots that showed her behind as being somewhat flat.  Why would you do that?  I would have liked to seen a shot of her bare feet, followed by a shoulder shot, but you can’t always get what you want. 

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