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14 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

I'm not knocking it.  She has had that effect for a loooong time, and many have fallen under her spell. She's got a unique youthful mischievous look. There's a ton of women her age that are stunningly beautiful, but not in her way. 

Yes, she's aged very well. If she's had work done it's very good. I'm guessing good genetics and tasteful plastic surgery. She also has no kids and is wealthy and successful so probably not much for her to worry about. That can really age you. She is a perfect 10  for me for a long time.

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5 hours ago, Katie_G said:

Dana was great. It's too bad TCM didn't publicize this more because I missed most of the Alain Delon film. I think she and Eddie are both obsessed with Grahame, and who can blame them?  Man On a Tightrope in particular showed Gloria's acting chops at their best.  She never overacted and always left you wanting more. I loved hearing about all the little actor's tricks and things only another actor would pick up on, like having her legs up in the air in both films, and putting her hands over the lamp. I'll be ordering the Noir magazine and looking forward to Dana's return in two weeks. And yeah, she looks hot for 65 - her cleavage is a lot better than my grandma's ever was.

“She never overacted and always left you wanting more.”  How true. Glenn Ford came across way better than he did in his last Noir Alley.  He seemed much more comfortable in his own skin.

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28 minutes ago, Thompson said:

“She never overacted and always left you wanting more.”  How true. Glenn Ford came across way better than he did in his last Noir Alley.  He seemed much more comfortable in his own skin.

i have seen the film before,i will watch Eddie,s comments tonight,Ford was probably more  comfortable because he had an intense affair with Grahame at the time,it helps..

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20 hours ago, mr6666 said:

 

Error by Eddie at least as I understood him.  He seemed to say the Noir City magazine has only been available as electronic.  Not so.  When I was a member several years ago, it came out only as a print edition.

One reason why I dropped out was because of only having an electronic version.  I don't read magazines, newspapers, etc. on electronic devices.

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55 minutes ago, Thompson said:

“She never overacted and always left you wanting more.”  How true. Glenn Ford came across way better than he did in his last Noir Alley.  He seemed much more comfortable in his own skin.

Neither my wife nor I was overly impressed with Ford in this movie.   He did a good enough job, but I much prefer him in movies such as Plunder of the Sun and Affair in Trinidad.  Affair in Trinidad is sort of a repairing of Ford and Hayworth from Gilda, but with a different story.  I like it better than Gilda.  Plunder is based on the book by David Dodge which I read before I saw the movie.  It was (is?) available from Hard Case Crime.  If you like Noir, crime, mystery movies, Hard Case is a good place to find books of the same type, especially the earlier publications.

As for Human Desire, I would give it a 2/5.  I am a train buff and I often found the trains and rail operations more entertaining than the movie.  It appears the trains they used were actually Southern Pacific with the name changed to Central National which does not sound like a real railroad of the period.

No doubt, it was Grahame's movie and she did a lot with her part.  Somehow I just couldn't believe most of the premise of the movie.   And Kathleen Case was totally ignored by Ford no matter how hard she threw herself at him.   Yet he falls totally for Grahame - until the end of the movie.   Crawford was OK, but seemed like they needed to develop his character more.  Sends his wife off to see the man he thinks she has been having an affair with so she can get his job back and then beats her up and gets her to help him murder the guy.  A bit of a stretch for me, no matter how crazy he might have been.

Grahame has been a lot of movies, but I like her most in Macao and In a Lonely Place, although she does really well whenever they gave her the chance.

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Now I can take a look at Broderick Crawford and know almost for sure that he has had a drink or two too many in his day.  I don’t buy the stumbling, not from an experienced dipsomaniac character he is playing.  No stumbling allowed is the mantra of all us drunks.  Now, Fritz didn’t leave any unfinished drinks at the railroad bar and that’s to his credit.  Ford smoked an okay cigarette, the package looked like Chesterfields, but he wasn’t great at it and he seemed to be smoking a new one when he should have been finishing the last one.  Lang should have just let Broderick drink his fill and challenge him to make it across the railroad tracks without stumbling.  No stumbling.

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Hard Case Crime publications have the most typos of any publisher by far.  Not a big deal really, but the works by the artists Hard Case Crime are publishing are the ones the other publishers already know aren’t going to make it.  What Hard Case Crime is good  for is getting the names of great writers out there, crime writers, there aren’t really that many good ones out there.

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7 hours ago, Dargo said:

Uh-huh, for a long time, alright.

In fact, I remember her having an "effect" on ME way back in 1994, and when she sported THIS little look in that godawful Garry Marshall flick Exit to Eden...

OIP.Eivt4Wd5aY6zxJoh4JMMkQHaLG?pid=ImgDe

LOL

Did I mention mischievous . . . . 

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On 9/18/2021 at 10:45 PM, Moe Howard said:

Eddie appears smitten, even a fresh paint job on that clip job hairdo. 

Does he have the hots for her or what? How does she rate a slot on Noir Alley? I refused to watch her intros/outros. A tv actress whose career was 25 years ago. 

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18 hours ago, ElCid said:

Neither my wife nor I was overly impressed with Ford in this movie.   He did a good enough job, but I much prefer him in movies such as Plunder of the Sun and Affair in Trinidad.  Affair in Trinidad is sort of a repairing of Ford and Hayworth from Gilda, but with a different story.  I like it better than Gilda.  Plunder is based on the book by David Dodge which I read before I saw the movie.  It was (is?) available from Hard Case Crime.  If you like Noir, crime, mystery movies, Hard Case is a good place to find books of the same type, especially the earlier publications.

As for Human Desire, I would give it a 2/5.  I am a train buff and I often found the trains and rail operations more entertaining than the movie.  It appears the trains they used were actually Southern Pacific with the name changed to Central National which does not sound like a real railroad of the period.

No doubt, it was Grahame's movie and she did a lot with her part.  Somehow I just couldn't believe most of the premise of the movie.   And Kathleen Case was totally ignored by Ford no matter how hard she threw herself at him.   Yet he falls totally for Grahame - until the end of the movie.   Crawford was OK, but seemed like they needed to develop his character more.  Sends his wife off to see the man he thinks she has been having an affair with so she can get his job back and then beats her up and gets her to help him murder the guy.  A bit of a stretch for me, no matter how crazy he might have been.

Grahame has been a lot of movies, but I like her most in Macao and In a Lonely Place, although she does really well whenever they gave her the chance.

His part wasn't very well written. He falls for Grahame without much motivation, then does a complete 180 at the end also without much development.

Yeah, Crawford was another script failure. Grahame does what he wants (though she doesn't want to) then he punishes her for it! The original film was much better.

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17 hours ago, Thompson said:

Now I can take a look at Broderick Crawford and know almost for sure that he has had a drink or two too many in his day.  I don’t buy the stumbling, not from an experienced dipsomaniac character he is playing.  No stumbling allowed is the mantra of all us drunks.  Now, Fritz didn’t leave any unfinished drinks at the railroad bar and that’s to his credit.  Ford smoked an okay cigarette, the package looked like Chesterfields, but he wasn’t great at it and he seemed to be smoking a new one when he should have been finishing the last one.  Lang should have just let Broderick drink his fill and challenge him to make it across the railroad tracks without stumbling.  No stumbling.

I have noticed that Chesterfields showed up in a lot of movies and TV shows from that period.  Wonder why?

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One more observation, in the beginning of the movie, it’s breakfast time at Uncle Joe’s, Ford has just returned from the war by train of course and tell’s Uncle Joe’s daughter that he had breakfast on the train and all he wants is a cup of coffee.  Then he goes into the kitchen and is served (before his coffee) what looks like slices of bacon but he’s got a knife and fork in his hand.  I don’t think it was kippers on the plate.  Maybe some people cut up their bacon with knife and fork?  Then, while he’s still fiddling with the bacon,  Daughter brings over two pieces of burnt toast.  They were not golden brown they were burnt.  Finally he gets his coffee but you don’t see him drink it.  Maybe it was Daughter trying to make brownie points with Ford by serving him things he said he didn’t want.  He had breakfast on the train.

Charles Willeford dies and Hard Case Crime comes sniffing around for unpublished manuscripts, doesn’t matter in the least what Willeford has to say, he’s dead.  They did the same thing with Donald E. Westlake and several other superior crime writers.  But, Hard Case Crime is a great source for introductions to these writers but the novels they publish are not their best work.  Library of America has I believe 3 Omnibuses of Noir writers from the 40’s and 50’s.  I recommend these.

 

 

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I enjoyed HUMAN DESIRE too. I like Gloria Grahame and Glenn Ford.  I also really like Dana Delaney. It's interesting she's such a big fan of Grahame.  I look forward to her return next week when they show THE GLASS WALL another Grahame noir. Hopefully we'll learn if Delaney ever met Gloria  Grahame and if they ever spent time together. 

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A pretty routine flick. Lang has a few good shadowy shots from the noir repertoire, but can't

help much with the worked over wifey trying to get someone to kill her hubby plot. If you were

dumb enough to marry an old ugly abuser like Crawford in the first place, well tough luck. Get

a d-i-v-o-r-c-e honey. I am still ambiguous about Mr. Owens. Was Gloria telling the truth about

his perviness or was that just another lie? And could old man Owens get it up and in in the present

day?  At least things end on a better note for Glenn since he can always pick up with the good girl

who practically rips her clothes off every time she talks to him. Train girls are easy.

 

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Dana Delaney -  who in the heck is she?  Starred in some famous noirs did she?  She’s a second rate television actress and two years older than Eddie and wrote a book.  I can’t believe her status here.  She most certainly should have covered up those wrestler like lower legs and unsightly knees.  Nobody wants to see 65 year old cleavage either, there is no perk and everybody knows it.  Plus, in the intro she confused Ford with Crawford as the drunk.  Is she friends with that Shirley McClain?  I’m sure she is a fine woman and upstanding citizen but why is she on Noir Alley?  Because of Gloria I assume.  A little too obsessive about Gloria?  A little hint-hint going on there?

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14 hours ago, Thompson said:

Dana Delaney -  who in the heck is she?  Starred in some famous noirs did she?  She’s a second rate television actress and two years older than Eddie and wrote a book.  I can’t believe her status here.  She most certainly should have covered up those wrestler like lower legs and unsightly knees.  Nobody wants to see 65 year old cleavage either, there is no perk and everybody knows it.  Plus, in the intro she confused Ford with Crawford as the drunk.  Is she friends with that Shirley McClain?  I’m sure she is a fine woman and upstanding citizen but why is she on Noir Alley?  Because of Gloria I assume.  A little too obsessive about Gloria?  A little hint-hint going on there?

Don't sugar coat it. Tell us how you really feel. 

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She was a host 2 or 3  years ago,nobody complained why she was   there.She looks great so what? As for Eddie 'falling,'for her, he surely knows she  plays for the other team..She will be back for The Glass Wall in 2 weeks so more eye candy.If the Gloria Grahame thing is so important they could have flown in Peter Turner from the UK (Grahame last boyfriend for several years) but TCM will not do it,they petered out their budget on lousy graphics and bad other things.

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I was curious as well why Delaney was co-hosting.  Not complaining about it, just curious.  And how is she getting younger?

It did feel like she was spouting out fact after fact at a rapid rate like she was trying to prove that she deserved to co-hosting.

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It was explained that Dana wrote an article for the latest Noir city magazine about Grahame.  Apparently she became a huge fan and has seen almost everything Gloria has done, including TV.  I enjoyed hearing her perspective and looking forward to her return in 2 weeks for The Glass Wall, another new one for me.

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