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1 hour ago, AndyM108 said:

The opening scene from The Killers, set in a diner in Brentwood, New Jersey, where Conrad and Charles McGraw are a pair of hitmen waiting for "the Swede" (Burt Lancaster) to show up.

oOOOOOOH, Okay!

The "Brentwood" thing threw me off, I was thinking Brentwood as in the suburb of Los Angeles, and was thinking "was William Conrad in THE LOVED ONE?"

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, some(I'd say most) of us aren't spending a lot of time listening to old recordings of old radio dramas, and really don't remember Mr. Conrad's "Gunsmoke" days.  For ME( and for instance) he will always be remembered as the erstwhile narrator for the ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE cartoon show.  ;)

Sepiatone

well, they're good and they're free. and before i started listening to GUNSMOKE on the radio, I never really understood the appeal of Westerns. (plus i can listen to them in the car or at the gym or working in the yard.)

some of the stories are way ahead of their time, and they got away with a lot more on the radio than they did in the movies or on TV in those days.

but yes, ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE is genius, I give you that.

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13 hours ago, revrnd said:

Thanks for all the great replies gang. I checked the IMCDB & this is the pic they showed:

i299693.jpg

(which isn't a great pic) After posting here, I Googled (1950 Nash Ambassador Six Super Brougham 'Airflyte') & fopund a lot of decent pics of the car in question, even 1 from the movie:

239885-CryDanger14.jpg

Being born in '61 most of the cars seen in this era were long gone from the roads. I do recall the Nash Metropolitan in pics.

The other cars that bewildered me was on the Sat' night movie shown a couple of weeks ago (not Mystery Street). I had never seen the sedans that were being used as taxi w/ suicide doors.

Most of the vehicles I'm familiar w/ from the 40s & 50s are Chev & Ford pickups & large trucks, plus the '55 & up Chevs which are well known cars.

 

During that period De Soto's and even Packards were used as taxis because they had large back seats.  You will frequently see De Soto's as taxis in movies from the 30's and 40's and maybe even early 50's.

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On 4/22/2018 at 6:53 AM, cigarjoe said:

 1950-51 Nash Statesman (that bobs up and down like a boat on an easy-glide suspension), The Nash Statesman is a hoot, you can't help but chuckle everytime you see tough guy Rocky driving around in what looks like a ridiculous upside down bathtub. :D

image.jpeg.ca990dcbe98988b30fa16659f0655252.jpeg

Image result for cry danger 1951

 

 

Talk about a little "tank!" What an ugly car.

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On 4/22/2018 at 1:24 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

CRY DANGER was one I'd seen before but remembered very little about, it's a well-made and very well acted film- the plot is slender, the end twist not one that'll floor you, and there's no punch to the finale (which is fine, but it does not make for a really memorable film.)

(SIDE NOTE- the first hour played fine, but i started having repeated sound sync and picture freeze issues throoughout the third act which i have to admit, marred my overall impression of the film.)

the sets and locations were great tho. if this had been a COLUMBIA picture, I guarantee you they would have had Powell stay in a "Hotel" with generic furniture, mid level shadows on the walls, and a philodenderon on the mantle.

the TRAILER PARK aspect really added something where something was needed.

I did liKE DICK POWELL very much in it, i've gotten familiar with his work on the radio lately, he was in a pretty good series called RICHARD DIAMOND, PI and he did a lot of other appearances (it's a medium he was really comfortable in.) ditto WILLIAM CONRAD, who will always be MATT DILLON (of GUNSMOKE to me.) He really seems to relish his role here, and he does a lot of lascivious things with his eyes in the part. The actor who played the William Bendixian "loopy war buddy" role was great, RHONDA FLEMING doesn't do anything besides look great- and it hurts the impact of the film- 

but the real scene stealer was JEAN PORTER AS "Part Time Model" (and full-time TREASURE) DARLENE. She really put the clamps to the battery of this thing every second she was on screen.

th?id=OIP.piRQM8PDpfmuaUdNT6wC1gAAAA&pid

YOU WERE TOO GOOD FOR THIS WORLD DARLENE!

 

Yes, I'd seen it before also, but I couldnt remember much about the plot. Once the film started, I remembered some things, but not all of it, or even the end!

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

found this online-

e70e0329af710e6408e9911e2ef8030c.jpg

More Deceptive Advertising! Rhonda wore nothing like this in the film. Speaking of her character. SPOILER!

 

 

How dumb could her character be??? Like Powell would forgive her for spending 5 years in prison when she could have prevented it???????

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Another thing I like about Cry Danger is how death of the Jean Porter character is handled and what takes place after that.

Darlene is one wild gal,  full of life and energy.   

But while the killing scene is brutal,  no actual body is shown:  A shot up car and someone making it clear by looking into the overturned care the girl is dead.  All very causal like. 

Rocky goes to the hospital to check on Delong.   Delong asks about the girl and finds out she has been killed but this is all done in a low key manner.    

But like the death of little Jones in The Big Sleep,   the death sets Rocky off.   He no longer cares about the loot but instead ensuring justice is done,  and that,  while he is in love with the femme fatale insuring she doesn't get off. 

This change in Rocky is also done in a low key manner.  I.e. NO big speeches,  no emotional baggage.  Not even a final confrontation with Nancy as it relates to how her selfishness lead to the death of an innocent young girl.  Just Rocky pretending to play along with Rocky alerting the police and just walking away down a lonely L.A. Street. 

 

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

More Deceptive Advertising! Rhonda wore nothing like this in the film. Speaking of her character. SPOILER!

 

I often see the posters or DVD covers for many movies from this period.  Very misleading.  Similar to the covers for pulp fiction.

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9 minutes ago, TheCid said:

I often see the posters or DVD covers for many movies from this period.  Very misleading.  Similar to the covers for pulp fiction.

As Hibi states it isn't that this Cry Danger poster is misleading but instead a spoiler (unless one is just focused on the dress, which would be trivial). 

SPOILER ALERT:

It isn't until the last part of the film that Rocky even suspects Nancy (and Danny her husband and friend of Rocky) of being in on the robbery.   Now Delong does about half way through but Rocky rejects this.   To me that poster does a disservice to first time viewers.   

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

More Deceptive Advertising! Rhonda wore nothing like this in the film...

and yet, she was still needlessly (and inexplicably) glamorous in the role. i couldn't help but keep thinking in every scene she was in "Honey, if you didn't spend $400.00 a month (in 1951 money!) to look like that, you could afford to move out of the trailer park."

That was some MGM Hair and Make-Up.

there was nothing about her that said "trailer park" and nothing that seemed stupid enough to explain the ending.

it was a hard role to get across, so I can't totally blame RHONDA FLEMING for not pulling it off; i think LINDA DARNELL would've been perfect, maybe JEAN HAGEN (to make the blind stupidity merging on murderous devotion angle more buyable)...I dunno, maybe JAN STERLING.

Weird as this may sound, CRY DANGER would've been an interesting reunion for Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake and William Bendix had the parties been interested (and i highly doubt it.)

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

and yet, she was still needlessly (and inexplicably) glamorous in the role. i couldn't help but keep thinking in every scene she was in "Honey, if you didn't spend $400.00 a month (in 1951 money!) to look like that, you could afford to move out of the trailer park."

That was some MGM Hair and Make-Up.

there was nothing about her that said "trailer park" and nothing that seemed stupid enough to explain the ending.

it was a hard role to get across, so I can't totally blame RHONDA FLEMING for not pulling it off; i think LINDA DARNELL would've been perfect, maybe JEAN HAGEN (to make the blind stupidity merging on murderous devotion angle more buyable)...I dunno, maybe JAN STERLING.

Weird as this may sound, CRY DANGER would've been an interesting reunion for Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake and William Bendix had the parties been interested (and i highly doubt it.)

Uh,   honey had 50K in cash!!!    She was just being smart;  staying in a trailer park until her husband got out of prison to ensure no one suspected that she had the loot.

As far as the ending;  I explained that above;   I guess you haven't seen The Big Sleep.

NOW,  if you wish to say it isn't believable that Rocky would care that about the harm to others caused by the femme fatale,   I could 'buy' that POV but Rocky also needed to ensure the police got the rest of the money or he would go back to the slammer.  

 

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On 4/22/2018 at 3:53 AM, cigarjoe said:

 1950-51 Nash Statesman (that bobs up and down like a boat on an easy-glide suspension), The Nash Statesman is a hoot, you can't help but chuckle everytime you see tough guy Rocky driving around in what looks like a ridiculous upside down bathtub. :D

Image result for cry danger 1951

 

I asked my dad about this car, since I had seen a photo of him standing in front of him many years ago. He told me the car actually belonged to a relative. He also wrote this:

One of the claims to fame of the Nash brand, was an option that allowed  the front seats to completely recline to make a flat bed- so you wouldn't have to rent a motel room while travelling. The other, the "easter egg" shape was to make it aerodynamically smooth- to reduce drag and thereby improve gas mileage. That really worked; the Nash brand had the best gas mileage of any full sized American car of it's time (about 25 mpg at highway speeds in 1950)- even though it was a large and comfortable car! Jay Leno has one of those, and he tells the story of how and why that car was so different than other cars of its time. Nash went out of business in 1976; they never focused on developing  powerful V8 engines to compete with the rest of the industry, thinking that a more economical car would still sell over performance. It's ironic, that had they held out for a few more years until the gas crises in 1978, they probably could have survived much longer.

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15 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, some(I'd say most) of us aren't spending a lot of time listening to old recordings of old radio dramas, and really don't remember Mr. Conrad's "Gunsmoke" days.  For ME( and for instance) he will always be remembered as the erstwhile narrator for the ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE cartoon show.  ;)

Sepiatone

Really?! Just for that, Sepia?! And not at least also for:

"The name: Richard Kimble. Destination: Death Row, state prison................."? 

(...and of course, also all opening set-up and 'Epilogue' narration?)

 

 

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Whereas, Rhonda didn't seem to be holding much of a torch for hubby and

whereas, $50,000 is almost $500,000 today, if I were her I'd be on a flight

to the south of France, far away from that crummy trailer park. 

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Btw, and speaking of Dick Powell...and FWIW here...

I frequent a restaurant/tavern twice a week located in Cottonwood AZ after I finish my tennis matches, and there's this manager of the place who's in his mid-to-late-thirties, and I swear he looks a lot like Dick Powell.

I once told him this, but of course being the age that he is, he had no idea who the actor was. However, after pulling up on my smartphone this very picture of Powell shown earlier in this thread...

DbWGydHW0AA2PpX.jpg

...and then showing it to him and a number of the waitresses mostly in their twenties who serve there(and who also of course had no idea of who Dick Powell was), they all agreed with me that Gunnar looks an awful lot like the deceased actor.

(...okay, okay...I DID preface all this with "FWIW" here, now didn't I???) :P

LOL

 

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8 hours ago, Dargo said:

Really?! Just for that, Sepia?! And not at least also for:

"The name: Richard Kimble. Destination: Death Row, state prison................."? 

(...and of course, also all opening set-up and 'Epilogue' narration?)

 

 

As his narration for ROCKY AND BULLWINKLE was long before THE FUGITIVE, and their work was in syndication long before AND after The Fugitive ended IT'S run, I'd have to say, "Yes.  Really!"  ;) 

Then there were the cases of "Conrad confusion".  As with a friend of mine who, in the '70's, made the comment upon seeing the TV drama CANNON for the first time, said----

"Man!  That 'Wild, Wild West' guy really LET HIMSELF GO!"  :D 

Sepiatone

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8 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Whereas, Rhonda didn't seem to be holding much of a torch for hubby and

whereas, $50,000 is almost $500,000 today, if I were her I'd be on a flight

to the south of France, far away from that crummy trailer park. 

i dunno, i don't think it was that bad as far as trailer parks go...There is and has been for some time a pretty avid trailer-life community all over southern california...although i think they've lost out on some prime real estate in the last couple of decades (i know there were communities in Laguna Beach and Malibu.)

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18 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Another thing I like about Cry Danger is how death of the Jean Porter character is handled and what takes place after that.

Darlene is one wild gal,  full of life and energy.   

But while the killing scene is brutal,  no actual body is shown:  A shot up car and someone making it clear by looking into the overturned care the girl is dead.  All very causal like. 

Rocky goes to the hospital to check on Delong.   Delong asks about the girl and finds out she has been killed but this is all done in a low key manner.    

But like the death of little Jones in The Big Sleep,   the death sets Rocky off.   He no longer cares about the loot but instead ensuring justice is done,  and that,  while he is in love with the femme fatale insuring she doesn't get off. 

This change in Rocky is also done in a low key manner.  I.e. NO big speeches,  no emotional baggage.  Not even a final confrontation with Nancy as it relates to how her selfishness lead to the death of an innocent young girl.  Just Rocky pretending to play along with Rocky alerting the police and just walking away down a lonely L.A. Street. 

 

 

my tv has been freezing up lately, and it froze before and during Darlene's death scene (I could hear the gunshots, but the pic was a frozen still of Powell and Fleming), and then would not turn back on for about 4-5 minutes after, so i missed all that!

when i discovered via dialogue on returning to the film that Darlene died, I think I yelled out something like "NO! NOT DARLENE!" followed by a series of expletives. 

I considered not going on with the movie- but i did.

the lack of sound sync and stunning number of times i have to turn off and restart my tv because of picture issues when watching live tv is ruining a lot of movies for me, i've gotten to where i try to watch them OnDemand instead.\

it is kind of heartbreaking.

but thank you, i love what you wrote about the ending and it makes me appreciate it all the more.

if CRY DANGER shows up OnDemand (as MYSTERY STREET was supposed to BUT NEVER DID, I will try to rewatch the third act which was marred by the technical glitches.)

 

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20 hours ago, Hibi said:

Talk about a little "tank!" What an ugly car.

130,000 people did not think so in 1949.  This was a 20% increase in sales for Nash and they outsold Chrysler, De Soto, and Studebaker among others.  Nash was considered a mid-price car.

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