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I assume they (he) have watched the film recently to have some fresh comments about it. Am sure they dont watch it during those recorded wrap arounds. Am sure Eddie films many of those in one day as do the other hosts.

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

:D  You sound like my ex mother in law, who thought ALL rock'n'roll tunes were about SEX or DRUGS.  ;) 

Sepiatone

They are.  Well there’s some gamblin and ramblin and whiskey drinking too.

 

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

I assume they (he) have watched the film recently to have some fresh comments about it. Am sure they dont watch it during those recorded wrap arounds. Am sure Eddie films many of those in one day as do the other hosts.

At the ending discussion they certainly act as though they just watched the film together.

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8 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

At the ending discussion they certainly act as though they just watched the film together.

Certainly. That is the illusion they wish to create. Don't misunderstand what I'm saying. There's nothing wrong with the way these things are taped. Naturally, the viewer wants to feel as if the host is watching the film along with them. However, do you think the on-screen talent wants to sit there for an hour and a half to watch a film they've already seen? And do you think the producers of these shows are OK with paying the crew for all that time of the set, when there's no real need?

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21 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Thanks for the heads up about that, Thompson.  I like Ken Burns documentaries.  Have you seen the one about the history of jazz?

I think I might have seen a couple of episodes of the baseball series,  but never seen all nine innings.

No I haven’t.  Sorry to say.  I should but jazz is like over my head or something and I’m not fond of horns.  However, the soundtrack in the Baseball innings is just super.  Really catches it.  I thought inning 5 would be on today same time on PBS but no.  Also, to see these men from a hundred years ago, with their chiseled features and genuine expressions, it’s just great.

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

:D  You sound like my ex mother in law, who thought ALL rock'n'roll tunes were about SEX or DRUGS.  ;) 

Sepiatone

Well, no I don't think all rock music is about those two things.  But listen to the lyrics of "Helter Skelter".  It seems fairly obvious to me.

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19 hours ago, nakano said:

Nobody mentionned this before I did sorry,no big deal,let's not make a federal case some people here are correcting for anything and sometimes are wrong. T his is what I wrote about,it was badly done. Obviously she had the same clothes because she did not know in advance that Glass Wall was broadcasted 2 weeks later.I do not  know why you  answered ,I was clear in my explanation,it was badly done and somebody at TCM did not do the advance work with Delany.

Nakano,  we seem to have a pattern of misunderstanding each other here.   It is not my intention or desire to "correct" you,  nor was I making a "federal case" out of anything.

You are right:  I did not read your post carefully enough,  or I may have seen that you were aware they recorded the two Noir Alley films in one session, but were just wondering why Dana Delany did not bring a change of clothes for the second "wraparound" with Eddie.  I do actually think someone else on this thread did mention that Miss Delany was wearing the same outfit in both shows.  But I'd have to scroll back a ways to find it, and don't have the time.

I definitely did not think the response I wrote you was "correcting" you,  I just thought it might be one idea as to why the lady was wearing the same clothes.  I even said I was not sure ,  it was just a theory.

Please don't take offense at my posts where none was intended.  I have nothing against you,  but you seem to think I do, or that I'm being rude to you or  something.  Not at all.

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On 10/14/2021 at 4:47 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Yes.  Although I love Hitchcock - at least his films -  I have heard that he did have this unfortunate tendency to dominate,  intimidate,  torture   (ok,  maybe not literally torture)  his female leads. He seemed to find it amusing.    I can especially see him doing it with someone as quiet and vulnerable as Kim Novak.  Not a nice side to the great director at all.

Tippi Hedren is an actress who said that Hitchcock tormented her during the making of The Birds, as well as Marnie, I believe. He also made an uncharacteristic overt sexual overture towards her during the making of the latter film. However that was not the case with Kim Novak. When she appeared at TIFF in 2015 for a showing of Vertigo she made a point, during an interview after the film, to say that she got along fine with the director and the negative reports that others claimed to have had in working with him was not her own experience. In fact she said she wished that Hitchcock (as well as Jimmy Stewart)  could have been in Toronto that day to share with her the special showing of Vertigo with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra performing the Bernard Herrmann score in live accompaniment with the film.

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Back to Noir Alley.

The Dark Past

 (1949) is tonight and tomorrow's presentation.  Saturday's does not come on until 1:30 AM ET Sunday due to the Clint Eastwood double feature.  Repeats again at 10:00 AM as usual.  This one does not sound familiar to me, so I guess I have not seen it. 

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27 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Back to Noir Alley.

The Dark Alley (1949) is tonight and tomorrow's presentation.  Saturday's does not come on until 1:30 AM ET Sunday due to the Clint Eastwood double feature.  Repeats again at 10:00 AM as usual.  This one does not sound familiar to me, so I guess I have not seen it. 

The film is The Dark Past with William Holden,  Nina Foch and Lee J. Cobb.

The Dark Past (1948) - IMDb

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56 minutes ago, JamesJazGuitar said:

The film is The Dark Past with William Holden,  Nina Foch and Lee J. Cobb.

The Dark Past (1948) - IMDb

Sorry, my error.  Brain not fully in gear yet.

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Then when it gets in gear it doesn’t last long.  Half hour maybe?  Starts to fade after forty-five minutes?  Then what?  Well, it’s simple, another shot of this or that to get the brain back in gear.  And so on.

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43 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Sorry, my error.  Brain not fully in gear yet.

The film,  The Dark Past,   is a remake of Blind Alley (1939),  and it is being shown on Noir Alley,  so any confusion is understandable.

 

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The Dark Past - not bad. It's a housebound "hostage" drama. Since the film is based upon a stage play, its mostly stationary nature makes sense. The thing I find most interesting about the film is its director, Rudolph Maté.  He started out as a cinematographer, photographing Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc and Vampyr.  He transitioned to directing in the 1940s. Aside from The Dark Past, he directed another couple of notable films noir: Union Station and the campy D.O.A.

Also, he directed one of my favorite films when I was a kid; When Worlds Collide.   This was the film supposedly premiering in the background of the 'Movie Premier Pot Bust' scene in L.A. Confidential.

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1 hour ago, unwatchable said:

The Dark Past - not bad. It's a housebound "hostage" drama. Since the film is based upon a stage play, its mostly stationary nature makes sense. The thing I find most interesting about the film is its director, Rudolph Maté.  He started out as a cinematographer, photographing Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc and Vampyr.  He transitioned to directing in the 1940s. Aside from The Dark Past, he directed another couple of notable films noir: Union Station and the campy D.O.A.

 

I didn't know D.O.A. was campy. Exciting, yes. Confusing, yes. Edmond O'Brien overacting as the film proceeds, yes. A fascinating plot premise, with a man investigating his own murder, yes. But campy, hmmm, that's news to me.

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O'Brien knows it's over so his non-stop hysteria and paranoia worked for me. The scene of him running in the street out of sheer panic over the diagnosis was one of many powerful moments, like the drug store scene with insane Neville Brand. The remake was another reason not to remake classic movies.

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3 minutes ago, jameselliot said:

O'Brien knows it's over so his non-stop hysteria and paranoia worked for me. The scene of him running in the street out of sheer panic over the diagnosis was one of many powerful moments, like the drug store scene with insane Neville Brand. The remake was another reason not to remake classic movies.

Adding to the drama of D.O.A. is Dimitri Tiomkin's musical score. Just watching the film's opening titles, an ordinary tracking shot of O'Brien walking into a police station, becomes an exciting experience because of the music accompanying him. It tells you something big is about to happen.

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8 minutes ago, unwatchable said:

And there's what makes the film campy.

Overacting or not, you didn't think his increasingly frenzied behaviour appropriate for a man who knew that time was running out?

Besides that you must regard a lot of films as 'campy" if it's based on overacting by a principal player in it.

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Overacting or not, you didn't think his increasingly frenzied behaviour appropriate for a man who knew that time was running out?

I know I'd be freaked out if I found out I was dying and had a very short time left. 

O'Brien's performance hit all the right notes for me. 

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Noir Alley delayed  by a man and his orangutan. There would  have been  time to  start The Dark Past at 1 am as Every Which Way

But Loose only runs  114 minutes.  I saw  The Dark Past on YT  a few years ago. Okay, but rather talky as  one might expect when

one  of the stars is a shrink. Thankfully the 75 minute running time limits the psycho babble.

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Just now, Vautrin said:

Okay, but rather talky as  one might expect when one  of the stars is a shrink.

...or when a film is based upon a stage play. I happen to like Lee J. Cobb's performance in this film.

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22 minutes ago, unwatchable said:

It's just my opinion. I fail to see why this concerns you so.

You, yourself, called it overacting, and not just acting.

Yes I did. But I can also see where his, to some, over the top histrionics work in the role. I certainly wouldn't label the film as "camp" because of it.

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