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Noir Alley

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50 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Perhaps they could not afford another "set?"  Of course, why have the bedroom scene at all.  Why not do it in a living room, kitchen, etc.?

Or just talk at work? They did plenty of that in the film.........

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On 6/25/2018 at 9:30 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

i've enjoyed reading what everyone has written about THE MAN WHO CHEATED HIMSELF, the SPAMALOT yesterday made it tough to post right after viewing, so i'll just touch on a few points.

I think John Dall is great in ROPE and THE CORN IS GREEN (for which he was nominated), I think he deserved a nomination for GUN CRAZY; this was the first film I have seen him in where he was "off." It was a really, really glib performance; and I think it was a case of overcompensation  because he was working opposite WILLIE LOMAN himself, LEE J COBB.

IN RE: LEE J COBB, I can never completely forgive him for GOLDEN BOY, but it was nice to see the underplaying it. is it right to say he is understated in ANNA AND THE KING OF SIAM? (that's how i recall him in it.)

i would bet you almost anything that COBB asked for JANE WYATT to be cast, I am thinking they had theater roots together, yes? And she also was having a hard time finding work because of some of her Leftist connections, i think? while it was a little like watching Nancy Reagan do DOUBLE INDEMNITY, i thought she had a feline quality that made her alluring(ish) in the right light. the costume dept. did her no favors, she wore a full house frock/bathrobe thing in the first scene that looked like an anniversary cake.

I bet her and Cobb's characters stayed up well past nine, blasting Glenn Miller records, playing double solitaire and eating graham crackers like nobody's business!

FORT POINT is still standing, it's a Historic Landmark (for the time being). with the housing crisis in the Bay Area tho, it's only so long before it's condos.

it was nice of Mickey Mouse to loan his convertible to the filmmakers for use as John Dall's "coupay" in this.

(i love how they say "cou-pay")

(i also hope FELIX FEIST pronounced his name as "FELIX FIST.")

 

That opening scene outfit of Wyatt's was HIDEOUS. I had a hard time concentrating on the theatrics during that scene. If memory serves I think Feist directed Joan's last film at WB, This Woman is Dangerous!

 

It was odd seeing Dall playing someone normal as I'm used to seeing him playing "off" characters (though he was fairly normal in The Corn is Green).......

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Did anyone here know the backstory of Lisa Howard? I'd never heard of this actress and was blown away hearing how her life evolved post-Hollywood. Learn so much from Eddie's intro/outros!

 

I also didnt know about Warner's son...

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3 hours ago, Hibi said:

I thought that whole beginning was written badly. I couldnt figure out what exactly her husband was planning. If he was planning to kill her, WHY did he leave the gun there? Why not just shoot her then and leave without returning???

I could be wrong on this, but I believe the plan was to come back after he could establish an alibi at the airport.  Once he had been seen at the airport he could return and enter the house through the door with the jimmied lock and use the hidden gun.  I assume he would then have to get back to the airport and catch the flight.  At least I think that's what was being implied...

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21 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

I could be wrong on this, but I believe the plan was to come back after he could establish an alibi at the airport.  Once he had been seen at the airport he could return and enter the house through the door with the jimmied lock and use the hidden gun.  I assume he would then have to get back to the airport and catch the flight.  At least I think that's what was being implied...

What you state is what I understood as well;   he wanted a solid alibi.

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Ok, that makes some sense then. Seems like it was more complicated than it needed to be.......

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3 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

I could be wrong on this, but I believe the plan was to come back after he could establish an alibi at the airport.  Once he had been seen at the airport he could return and enter the house through the door with the jimmied lock and use the hidden gun.  I assume he would then have to get back to the airport and catch the flight.  At least I think that's what was being implied...

Thanks, I never caught that.  I kept wondering why he jimmied the door.  Of course he used a tool from the fireplace set in that room, which even back then the police probably could have matched to the jimmy marks.

Just seems the movie/script needed about 15 more minutes to explain things.

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I'm glad others noticed that hideous dress/black out curtain that Jane Wyatt was

wearing at the start of the film. Not being much of a fashionista, I figured maybe

that's what high society dames wore at the time. I enjoyed one brief shot where

she tilts her head back slightly and blows out the smoke from her ciggy, as if to

say Why are these common people all around here bothering me? And yes, the

scene where Cobb and Dall are getting ready to go to beddy bye in the same

room was hilarious. Call the vice squad, ASAP.

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20 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

I could be wrong on this, but I believe the plan was to come back after he could establish an alibi at the airport.  Once he had been seen at the airport he could return and enter the house through the door with the jimmied lock and use the hidden gun.  I assume he would then have to get back to the airport and catch the flight.  At least I think that's what was being implied...

OOOOOOOOOH! Thank you, I get it now!

for those of you who saw it, this film bears a thematic resemblance to TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY 1951, also directed by FELIX FEIST- also about two lovers on the run from the cops.

that film also has a "twist" at the end that reveals the whole flight of the couple has been unnecessary- they were running out of fear when the law was not looking for them. THE MAN WHO FRAMED HIMSELF has something of a semblance to that- the protagonist puts himself 100% in this position- he could have BEEN HONEST and in all likelihood, things would have been JUST FINE.

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HIBI

FORT POINT is still standing, it's a Historic Landmark (for the time being). with the housing crisis in the Bay Area tho, it's only so long before it's condos.

FORT POINT IS IN THE PRESIDIO, WHICH  is a very valued historic and tourist attraction.  Unlike other cities, San Francisco takes its architectural  heritage very seriously.

And that's why the Fox theater was torn down in the early 60s? Just sayin'....

The Fox Theatre was torn down in 1963 before, HISTORIC PRESERVATION BECAME A CAUSE TO SAVE HISTORIC BUILDINGS.  MRS JACKIE KENNEDY-ONASSIS SPEARHEADED HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A CAUSE IN THE SEVENTIES.

As for SAN FRANCISCO, I lived there in the 70s and ;

I saw a transformation in the way the community (spearheaded by thE GAY COMMUNITY) ,ADVOCATED to keep its architectural history. 

I ALSO WORKED IN HELPING THE LOS ANGELES CONSERVANCY AND THE ART DECO SOCIETY LA FIGHT TO SAVE BUILDINGS IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA.  THE ART DECO WILTERN THEATRE AND ITS OFFICE COMPLEX WAS SAVED, PLUS other buildings in Los Angeles such as the MOVIE PALACE CORE ON BROADWAY BLVD.  That included the LOS ANGELES MOVIE PALACE IN DOWNTOWN, LA, WHICH AS A STRONG RESEMBLANCE TO THE SF FOX THEATRE.

I ,also have a background in art history from which I specialized in historical architecture. IF people want to see these magnificent MOVIE PALACES, THE LOS ANGELES CONSERVANCY HAS DOCENT TOURS TO VIEW THESE TREASURES.  IT IS WELL WORTH IT.

Here is an article that states that this theatre was modeled after the SAN FRANCISCO FOX THEATRE with special individual luxury features that SF FOX  did not have. 

http://www.losangelestheatre.com/history

 
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Fans of Noir Alley (Noiristas as Eddie refers to them) who don’t mind reading subtitles might want to check out the TCM Imports selection this coming Sunday evening, which is the 1966 French film Le Deuxième Souffle (“the second breath”).  Although the run time is a bit challenging at 2 h 30 m, this film has many of the characteristics of a good Noir film (crime-related, excellent black and white cinematography, some great twists in the story).  The film is scheduled for 2:30 am ET late Sunday/early Monday and it is also a premiere showing for TCM.

Here is the IMDB page for the film:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060305/

Set your recording devices accordingly!

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22 hours ago, arpirose said:

HIBI

FORT POINT is still standing, it's a Historic Landmark (for the time being). with the housing crisis in the Bay Area tho, it's only so long before it's condos.

FORT POINT IS IN THE PRESIDIO, WHICH  is a very valued historic and tourist attraction.  Unlike other cities, San Francisco takes its architectural  heritage very seriously.

And that's why the Fox theater was torn down in the early 60s? Just sayin'....

The Fox Theatre was torn down in 1963 before, HISTORIC PRESERVATION BECAME A CAUSE TO SAVE HISTORIC BUILDINGS.  MRS JACKIE KENNEDY-ONASSIS SPEARHEADED HISTORIC PRESERVATION AS A CAUSE IN THE SEVENTIES.

As for SAN FRANCISCO, I lived there in the 70s and ;

I saw a transformation in the way the community (spearheaded by thE GAY COMMUNITY) ,ADVOCATED to keep its architectural history. 

I ALSO WORKED IN HELPING THE LOS ANGELES CONSERVANCY AND THE ART DECO SOCIETY LA FIGHT TO SAVE BUILDINGS IN THE LOS ANGELES AREA.  THE ART DECO WILTERN THEATRE AND ITS OFFICE COMPLEX WAS SAVED, PLUS other buildings in Los Angeles such as the MOVIE PALACE CORE ON BROADWAY BLVD.  That included the LOS ANGELES MOVIE PALACE IN DOWNTOWN, LA, WHICH AS A STRONG RESEMBLANCE TO THE SF FOX THEATRE.

I ,also have a background in art history from which I specialized in historical architecture. IF people want to see these magnificent MOVIE PALACES, THE LOS ANGELES CONSERVANCY HAS DOCENT TOURS TO VIEW THESE TREASURES.  IT IS WELL WORTH IT.

Here is an article that states that this theatre was modeled after the SAN FRANCISCO FOX THEATRE with special individual luxury features that SF FOX  did not have. 

http://www.losangelestheatre.com/history

 

This area: 

A6YyjNG.jpg

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uBEyITC.jpg

 

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On 6/26/2018 at 5:14 PM, Vautrin said:

I'm glad others noticed that hideous dress/black out curtain that Jane Wyatt was

wearing at the start of the film. Not being much of a fashionista, I figured maybe

that's what high society dames wore at the time. I enjoyed one brief shot where

she tilts her head back slightly and blows out the smoke from her ciggy, as if to

say Why are these common people all around here bothering me? And yes, the

scene where Cobb and Dall are getting ready to go to beddy bye in the same

room was hilarious. Call the vice squad, ASAP.

You can tell a femme fatale by her hair and Jane's is way too tight and controleld and looks like a hair helmet. Tight hair is for uptight folks and loose hair like Mamie Van Doren's or Diana Dors means loose morals in films. This is why Jane was the perfect wife for Robert Young and not Errol Flynn. The hair thing goes for men too. Haven't you ever noticed how that hair that looks sprayed into a tight shape on some televangelists, usually belongs to someone who is a faith healer who thinks dancing is the next step to being in a den of inequity. 

I rest my case, and my case of Aquanet too.

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I'm not knocking San Francisco, but was just pointing out they certainly didnt do justice to the Fabulous Fox (as it used to be called) and probably other buildings as well over the years. It's like that everywhere. Some places more than others. Tear down the old, on with the new!

I'm well aware of the Conservancy and LA has a lot more old theaters still standing than other cities. Some of that was luck (the area not being prime real estate) but hard work too. But not all of them survived. Can only do so much.

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I'm not knocking San Francisco, but was just pointing out they certainly didnt do justice to the Fabulous Fox (as it used to be called) and probably other buildings as well over the years. It's like that everywhere. Some places more than others. Tear down the old, on with the new!

I'm well aware of the Conservancy and LA has a lot more old theaters still standing than other cities. Some of that was luck (the area not being prime real estate) but hard work too. But not all of them survived. Can only do so much.

During 1963, things were so different.  Historical architecture meant nothing to urban planners. You should see the ugly office buildings that were placed in its absence.  However, in the 70s to the 80s things changed.  Today in SF, THERE ARE historic overlay zones to prevent thE wanton dEstruction of its HISTORIC CORE.

 

ABOUT THE CONSERVANCY, THEY WORKED ESPECIALLY HARD TO KEEP ITS HISTORIC LEGACY.  Not all were a success.  A lot was lost in the Wilshire Blvd area including its theatres. 

By the way, the Los Angeles is a virtual sister to the FOX SAN FRANCISCO. THE LOS ANGELES HAD MORE FEATURES LIKE A SPECIAL SOUND PROOF CRYING ROOM FOR MOTHERS TO KEEP THEIR CHILDREN AWAY FROM THE MAIN THEATRE. THESE FOX THEATRES WERE THE LEGACY OF WILLIAM FOX.

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3 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

You can tell a femme fatale by her hair and Jane's is way too tight and controleld and looks like a hair helmet. Tight hair is for uptight folks and loose hair like Mamie Van Doren's or Diana Dors means loose morals in films. This is why Jane was the perfect wife for Robert Young and not Errol Flynn. The hair thing goes for men too. Haven't you ever noticed how that hair that looks sprayed into a tight shape on some televangelists, usually belongs to someone who is a faith healer who thinks dancing is the next step to being in a den of inequity. 

I rest my case, and my case of Aquanet too.

I can't say I've ever paid a lot of attention to the particular hairstyles of the various

femme fatales. I'll have to take a closer look and see if it's true about these bad wimmin.

But I agree on the often bad hair of the TV evangelists. By their rugs ye shall know them.

Joel Osteen has pretty nice hair, but he likely has a personal hair stylist on the payroll.

This is my hair stylist, this is my comb, I do what they say. Hairelujah.

 

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20 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

This area: 

uBEyITC.jpg

 

Ah yes, my Nana Forbes used to tell great stories about the time she saw "ONE WITH THE IND" at the OXIE Theatre...

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Up this weekend on Noir Alley: "Armoured Car Robbery". This is a cool little heist movie, starring William Talman as the brains of the heist operation, and Charles McGraw as the cop assigned to figure out who did the heist job. Both are well-cast.

Talman has a great face for noir; it's rough and sad at the same time. He's hard as nails, yet you feel sorry for him. This goes for all his roles, not just as the heist boss in "Armoured Car Robbery". 

Same could be said for Charles McGraw. What a great tough guy, whether he's cast as villain ("The Killers") or hero (sort of - "The Narrow Margin".)

I won't say much about "Armoured Car Robbery" yet, as I hate people who do the spoiler thing and don't want to be one of them. But I do recommend this Richard Fleischer film (who also directed "The Narrow Margin"and "Compulsion", among others.) It's got all the elements a good noir should have, including one of those "terrain vague" locations I've mentioned before, lots of tough talk, and oh yes, a stripper girlfriend - er, no, wife - who's bored with her profession, along with a few other things.

Anyway, it's a fun ride for noir fans. Check it out. I'm looking forward to hear what Eddie has to say about it.

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11 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Up this weekend on Noir Alley: "Armoured Car Robbery". This is a cool little heist movie, starring William Talman as the brains of the heist operation, and Charles McGraw as the cop assigned to figure out who did the heist job. Both are well-cast.

 I do recommend this Richard Fleischer film (who also directed "The Narrow Margin"and "Compulsion", among others.) It's got all the elements a good noir should have, including one of those "terrain vague" locations I've mentioned before, lots of tough talk, and oh yes, a stripper girlfriend - er, no, wife - who's bored with her profession, along with a few other things.

Anyway, it's a fun ride for noir fans. Check it out. I'm looking forward to hear what Eddie has to say about it.

1. What a great write-up!

2. Among the other things Richard Fleischer directed is MANDINGO (1975). I saw it last weekend. I'm never going to look at his work the same way again, actually I'm never going to look at anything the same way again (read my review somewhere a few pages back in the I JUST WATCHED thread if you DARE.)

3. I love the term "terrain vague."

4. I was gonna make a superfluous u joke, but Lord Knows, Canada has taken enough crap from The States lately. Enjoy your superfluous "u"s, the majesty of your landscape, your sane (for the moment at least) government- and please be patient with your neighbor country until we are under new management.

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Richard Fleicher did not want to stay directing B Pictures .  He graduated from them to direct some  very good A pictures such as THE BOSTON STRANGLER, DR. DOOLITTLE, THE FANTASTIC VOYAGE AND THE GIRL IN THE RED VELVET SWING. and more.

forgot to mention 10 Rillington Place (1971) that FLEICHER DIRECTED WITH A YOUNG RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH. I suppose that would be calLED NEO-NOIR TODAY.

EDDIE neglects to  MENTION THAT ASPECT OF Fleicher's career.  Richard Fleicher was a good enough director to be making A pictures for the major studios. He was a respected DIRECTOR THROUGHOUT THE INDUSTRY.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

2. Among the other things Richard Fleischer directed is MANDINGO (1975). I saw it last weekend. I'm never going to look at his work the same way again, actually I'm never going to look at anything the same way again (read my review somewhere a few pages back in the I JUST WATCHED thread if you DARE.)

By coincidence, Mandingo (1975) has been scheduled as a TCM premiere late on July 25 at 2:30am ET, so anyone interested will be able to appreciate your comments.  ?

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32 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

By coincidence, Mandingo (1975) has been scheduled as a TCM premiere late on July 25 at 2:30am ET, so anyone interested will be able to appreciate your comments.  ?

Isnt Perry King in it? I cant wait!

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11 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Isnt Perry King in it? I cant wait!

YES, AND CHILD: YOU SEE EVERTHANG!!!!!!!!

You missed the discussion in the I JUST WATCHED thread too, I see.....

ps- I still can't believe TCM is showing this thing. (again- neither approving nor disapproving, just stunned.)

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26 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

YES, AND CHILD: YOU SEE EVERTHANG!!!!!!!!

You missed the discussion in the I JUST WATCHED thread too, I see.....

ps- I still can't believe TCM is showing this thing. (again- neither approving nor disapproving, just stunned.)

 

LOL! I'm marking it down on my calendar! :D

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Armored Car Robbery sounds like one of those movies I might have already seen,

but can't be sure until I see the first few minutes of it. At least it gives some

indication of what the movie is about, unlike such one word noir titles as Framed,

Pitfall, Impact, Jigsaw, Manhandled, etc., etc. And being only 68 minutes long,

you don't really care if it isn't great.

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