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16 minutes ago, Looney said:

See I did get STAR 80.  I believe I got all of those, but if my memory serves ERASERHEAD was only available to me for a couple of days then gone.

I wish TCM would show more "raunchy" stuff and beyond just "raunchy" for them. ;) I do love that stuff because it is usually either entertaining or bewildering. :lol:

ERASERHEAD shows up on TCM DEMAND every time it has aired on TCM (which has been at least twice in the last year.)

I tried to watch it both times and made it about 20 minutes in.

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Farewell My Lovely has been discussed on this forum before.  It has been shown on cable before, but not sure which channels. 

It is available on DVD, often in a set with the not nearly as good Mitchum's The Big Sleep.  Try oldies.com, ccvideo.com or some others.  I recorded it from TV to DVD and then purchased the DVD.

This version is much better than Murder My Sweet.  Of course a lot is due to when it was made, but I still think Mitchum and the script are better than the Powell version.  Much better.

This is an excellent movie and well worth watching several times.

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Re: The Locket.  Sorry I'm late to the conversation about this film.  It was my anniversary on Monday and then my husband and I went to the coast for a few days.  I'm also going on a business trip to Austin next week, so I've been busy.  

I'd seen this film once before and really enjoyed it.  The storyline was a bit confusing at first, until this time around.  I really sat down and watched the film and was able to easily piece together the narrative.  The flashback within a flashback within a flashback narrative style reminded me of a Russian nesting doll.  The large doll represented the present with the smaller dolls inside representing one of the flashbacks.  Laraine Day as a child was the smallest nesting doll.  As the flashback segments reached their conclusion, this represented the dolls being put back inside one another until the end of the film, when we're back at the present day, i.e. the largest nesting doll. I thought the storyline played out nicely and was very interesting.  I love Robert Mitchum and while I'm not sure why his character committed suicide, I really liked the role he played in the film.  I thought perhaps Mitchum was so consumed by guilt that an innocent man died because of Nancy's lies, something that perhaps he felt that he was complicit in her deceit. Then I had the thought that perhaps he was pulling some type of Madge from Dark Passage stunt and that he was going to take the truth to the grave with him, just to make Nancy pay for her lies.

I am curious about the ending.  Did Nancy know that she was marrying into the family that triggered her mania in the first place? Is Nancy some sort of masochist? Or perhaps she let her desire for material goods override her childhood trauma? Did Mrs. Willis know that this was the "housekeeper's daughter" whom was friends with her deceased daughter Karen? 

This was such a fascinating film, I think it would be one of those films that I could watch over and over and get something new out of it each time.  In fact, maybe I'll re-watch it this weekend.  I also really liked Laraine Day.  I'd seen her previously in Mr. Lucky with Cary Grant, but The Locket showed me that Day was a talented actress.  It's a shame that she didn't become a bigger star.  I also really liked Brian Aherne.  I'd seen him in other films here and there.  I think I prefer him with his mustache. 

Leonard Maltin perhaps should re-watch this film as well.  It's definitely worth more than 2 stars. 

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13 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Yeah, I tried with the 1978 version of THE BIG SLEEP. I could get past the contemporary setting, but taking place in ENGLAND???!!!!

The thing is if you completely forget about the Bogey version the time period and the UK and watch it it follows the novel much better than the original and the plot makes perfect sense. Try it sometime.?

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9 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The thing is if you completely forget about the Bogey version the time period and the UK and watch it it follows the novel much better than the original and the plot makes perfect sense. Try it sometime.?

Not sure it is the setting or in comparison to Bogie's as much as just not a very good movie.

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On 9/7/2018 at 8:59 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

ERASERHEAD shows up on TCM DEMAND every time it has aired on TCM (which has been at least twice in the last year.)

I tried to watch it both times and made it about 20 minutes in.

You mean you didn't get to see the little creatures which remind one of paisley designs, swimming in the dresser drawer?

That's really too bad, Lorna.

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1 hour ago, CaveGirl said:

You mean you didn't get to see the little creatures which remind one of paisley designs, swimming in the dresser drawer?

That's really too bad, Lorna.

Yeah, yeah, I guess it was.

But I did catch the "boiling a human being alive" scene in MANDINGO so, it sounds about even.

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18 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The thing is if you completely forget about the Bogey version the time period and the UK and watch [the 1978 version of THE BIG SLEEP] it follows the novel much better than the original and the plot makes perfect sense. Try it sometime.?

well, the thing is, it is impossible for me to completely forget the 1946 THE BIG SLEEP because it might actually be in my top ten most-viewed titles of all time. when i lived in LA i especially loved it, as i taped it off the PBS station AND HAD NO tcm AT THE TIME.

i've seen it maybe 25+ times....i even watched it ON DEMAND when it was available after BACALL's SUTS day.

Beyond that: putting PHILLIP MARLOWE in ENGLAND makes as much sense as having SHERLOCK HOLMES shaking down a West Hollywood dirty picture racket with a penchant for blackmail: it. don't. make. sense.

also why is JIMMY STEWART in it?

And why is one of his daughters British and the other one is CANDY CLARK?

Too many extra questions for a story that already has enough unanswered.

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15 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Beyond that: putting PHILLIP MARLOWE in ENGLAND makes as much sense as having SHERLOCK HOLMES shaking down a West Hollywood dirty picture racket with a penchant for blackmail: it. don't. make. sense.

The film's explanation is that Phillip Marlowe joined the service during WWII (remember that the original The Big Sleep took place in the late 1930s) and decided to stay in the UK after the War. I'm guessing that since the budget money and Director came from the UK they decided on the changes, most of the actors are from the UK. It's plausible.  

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also why is JIMMY STEWART in it?

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He was another expat same as Marlowe, he stayed in the UK after the war married an English woman had two daughters.

 

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And why is one of his daughters British and the other one is CANDY CLARK?

One was educated in the UK, the other was sent to America to live with his sister for her education after the mother died, if I remember right.

Again I'm just guessing but I'll bet in the UK Farewell My Lovely was a big enough hit to get the financing for the sequel provided they set it in the UK.

It happened before with Mickey Spillane, The Girl Hunters (1963) was financed in the UK and except for establishing shots was filmed in London.

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My thoughts from June 17, 2012 when I first saw the film.

Desperate (1947)

Another exceptionally stylish Noir, Mann is at top form right out of the starting gate, some great cinematography sequences here that definitely look as if they influenced Sergio Leone. There is a back room beating of Steve Brodie that is reminiscent of the introduction to Harmonica at the trading post in Once Upon A Time In The West, and a countdown to an execution that will recall the three way shootout at the end of The Good The Bad And The Ugly, involving a clock, and ever increasing closeups of Brodie, Burr, and Challee. 

The swinging light fight: 

https://youtu.be/krNLQw8sI34

An excellent Noir all the way hitting on all cylinders. Burr and Challee shine as the goons after Steve, Challee reminds me of noir staple Jack Lambert, he could almost play his brother. 

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MAYBE I give THE BRITISH BIG SLEEP (1978) a shot...

after all, I first read the Chandler novel when i was, i think, 14 years old and (of course) did not get it and thought it was awful.

then when i was 16, i read a battered copy of FAREWELL MY LOVELY a try and I loved it.

I've since read all six of the MARLOWE novels and even went back a while ago and re-read THE BIG SLEEP which I totally got this time around, especially since I had lived in LA and worked in horticulture and I got all of Chandler's numerous floral and faunal references (CHANDLER is one of the best for referencing nature, blooms and plants in his stuff.)

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55 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

MAYBE I give THE BRITISH BIG SLEEP (1978) a shot...

after all, I first read the Chandler novel when i was, i think, 14 years old and (of course) did not get it and thought it was awful.

then when i was 16, i read a battered copy of FAREWELL MY LOVELY a try and I loved it.

I've since read all six of the MARLOWE novels and even went back a while ago and re-read THE BIG SLEEP which I totally got this time around, especially since I had lived in LA and worked in horticulture and I got all of Chandler's numerous floral and faunal references (CHANDLER is one of the best for referencing nature, blooms and plants in his stuff.)

It's like Marlowe in a parallel universe. ?

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DESPERATE

I've seen this one a few times, and always enjoy it. As cigarjoe said, (in so many words), it's got some fine b & w cinematography, and a few of the "back room " scenes where our hero gets beaten up are definitively noirish. Especially that "swinging light" scene, to which cigarjoe provides a link. Has Raymond Burr ever looked more menacing?

I always liked this particular noir narrative: ( 'cause we all know there are a number of noir storylines, not just one...) The one where some innocent, well-meaning, decent guy, often just-married or in love with an equally innocent decent girl, gets inexorably drawn into to a web of crime and danger. Sometimes, as in the case of Deperate, he doesn't even commit a crime, but he's set up in such a way that it looks as though he has. In these kinds of noirs, the protagonist is pursued by both the criminals and the law. I like this kind of storyline because it seems as though there's nowhere for the hero to turn - his life (and more importantly, his wife's) is threatened by the bad guys, but due to circumstances outside his control (very noirish), he can't turn to the police. He has nowhere to turn - hence the title !

Steve Brodie is extremely sympathetic in the role of the nice ordinary law-abiding guy who just wants to work hard and spend whatever time he's not working with his sweet (and very pretty) wife. Despite the reasons Eddie gave in his intro for why Brodie didn't get cast in leads more often, I really liked him in Desperate and wish he'd been given more lead roles as this kind of hero.

Desperate is full of great scenes, many with Steve and his wife fleeing desperately (yes !) from everyone to get to a "safe place". I especially liked the bit where the law's set up a road block and they inspect the back of a truck to search for the fugitives. The truck is full of  masks and giant carnival heads, under which Steve and Anne are hiding. The dumb cops don't think to look very hard for them, even though the truck is a treasure trove of hiding places for such runaways. It's those kind of bizarre images that make for good noirs. (I tried to find a still of this scene to post here, but no luck.)

Anthony Mann directed several really good noirs, as Eddie M. mentioned; later he turned to Westerns, where he did equally well. 

 

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Eddie mentioned that critics site plot holes and implausibilities, but I look at Desperate as a simple visual Noir,  a sort of Graphic Novel/Comic Book Noir, and nobody ever reads comic books for a complex story or the dialog. 

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I enjoyed DESPERATE.  I have to say Burr was definitely my favorite part.  I really appreciated seeing Brodie get his chance to be the star, but the Burr side of the tale stole the show for me.  I love how simple it was.

ME CRIMINAL.

ME DESPERATE TO GET MY LITTLE BROTHER OFF THE HOOK.

ME COME UP WITH PLAN TO FORCE THIS OTHER GUY TO TAKE THE FALL.

ME STICK TO THAT PLAN NO MATTER WHAT ALL THE WAY UP TO MY LITTLE BROTHER BEING EXECUTED.

I mean it was insanely 'Desperate'.  :lol:  But seriously it was great because he was so simple that once he got it in his head that this was the way to save his little brother he could devise no other plan - definitely desperate and menacing.  I love how you know months are going by while all the while Radak (Burr) is just locked in that little dark room waiting for his prize to be brought back to him so he can save his little brother.  You have Randall (Brodie) desperate and on the run and Radak (Burr) and locked in a room.  It all worked so well, except for the little parts here and there where it didn't. :lol:  (I mean we can put two and two together and assume there was some way Radak (Burr) found Randall (Brodie) at the end, but it would have been nice to see Randall's (Brodie) mistake.  Up to that point a big part of the movie was how Radak (Burr) was able to find Randall (Brodie), so skipping that part at the last moment didn't really work for the narrative other than creating suspense - Muller said there would be huge plot holes.  Of course it wouldn't have been a shock, but we all knew it was coming anyway.  Maybe they didn't see it coming in 1947, but we all knew in 2018. :D)

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While there were a lot of plot holes in Desperate, it would have taken a three hour movie to cover them.  However, it was meant to be a "B" movie of about one hour length.  Within those constraints, it did a very good job of having a reasonable plot and lots of action.  It actually moved along very well and didn't drag.  As noted above, you just have to assume certain things happened.

I was very familiar with Raymond Burr as Perry Mason long before I became acquainted with his bad guy roles (thanks to TCM).  Have PM on DVD and watch episodes frequently.  Sometimes amazed that Burr could do both PM and bad guys so well.

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The best thing about Desperate was that I hadn't seen it before. Sometimes I'll get ready to

watch one of these noir flicks and then realize, after five or ten minutes, that I've already seen

it, especially those ones with one word titles that don't give much of a clue as to what the movie

is about. The story of the innocent, (relatively) young married couple trying to get away from the

nutso criminals is usually a good one. There's a bit of the old hiding in the country where simple

living abounds to get away from the big city menace that is on its way to spoil everything. Some

of the visuals were certainly interesting, especially the final shootout in the stairwell of the

apartment house. I got a kick out of Burr's henchman calling the stuff in the refrigerator "tired"

meat. Yuck. I also noticed that, just like in TV westerns, the dumb cop came out behind his

shelter to stand out in the open so he could get shot. When will they ever learn? All in all, a

nice spare and entertaining movie.

 

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4 minutes ago, Hepburn Fan said:

There are way too many pages here, so I will just ask if there has ever been an answer to the question, why an encore performance to Noir Alley?

It used to be on just Sunday mornings at 10 AM Eastern time. Many people complained about the early hour, as people like to sleep in, or attend church services. And others felt that Noir just works better when viewed at night. So they added the Saturdays at midnight Eastern time showings.

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The November Noir Alley lineup includes:

  • The Sniper (1952) - November 3/4
  • The Threat (1949) - November 10/11
  • The Woman in the Window (1944) - November 17/18
  • The Killing (1956) - November 24/25

Have seem all of them except The Threat.    Looking this one up it sounds like it will be a good way to spend 1 hour and 6 minutes.

When released The New York Times gave the film a positive review, writing, "...[the film is] reasonably well written...[and] Charles McGraw is first-rate as the gravel-voiced, square-jawed, ruthless gangster, while Michael O'Shea, Virginia Grey and Frank Conroy chip in with adequate portrayals of the cop, district attorney and gangster's moll. Crime, after all, does not pay, but Mr. McGraw can make it diverting."

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