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Id bet you anything That one of those 21 shooting days on ANGEL FACE Was 18 hours long and Preminger probably made jean Simmons do 137 takes of a scene where she breaks down on learning that her father has died as a result of her treachery.

And I bet they never even loaded the camera with film.

 

 

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34 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Id bet you anything That one of those 21 shooting days on ANGEL FACE Was 18 hours long and Preminger probably made jean Simmons do 137 takes of a scene where she breaks down on learning that her father has died as a result of her treachery.

And I bet they never even loaded the camera with film.

 

 

LOL.

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On 9/17/2018 at 11:32 AM, misswonderly3 said:

Yeah, I too got to thinking about who the 5 ultimate femme fatales could be. How about:

Kathie, ( Jane Greer) in Out of the Past.   And Coral "Dusty" Chandler  (Lizabeth Scott) in Dead Reckoning.  Of course, as mentioned, Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) in Double Indemnity. But the ultimate femme fatale, the unquestionably most evil female character I've ever seen, I think, in a film, has to be Margot Shelby (Jean Gillie) in a little-known noir called Decoy.

My list changes based on the latest films I've seen.  I just saw Too Late for Tears (1949), and enjoyed Lizabeth Scott's performance as the femme fatale. Also, in Born to Be Bad (1950), Joan Fontaine's character doesn't murder anyone, but she's as manipulative and amoral as they come.  I haven't seen Decoy yet, but it sounds really good.

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Gotta wonder where Eddie might place Claire Trevor on this list of his and if it extended past five?

(...'cause she's pretty darn effective as this type in both Murder, My Sweet and Born to Kill, remember)

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On 9/17/2018 at 11:52 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Hibi nailed it with the “lavender” thing; Angel Face (the rose) Is as close as  you get to a blue rose.

Image result for rosemary clooney blue rose

Sorry, Lorna, I couldn't resist. "Blue Rose" is the title of an album by Rosemary Clooney and Duke Ellington. The song selections are first-rate, from what they call "The American Songbook" -  all great tunes composed by the Duke.

Duke Elllington and his band are in fine form, as is Miss Clooney's silky voice. I love this record.

Ok, now I'm really being self-indulgent. I just have to include here one of the tracks. Of course it's got "Mood Indigo", which is appropriately noir, plus indigo is blue. But I'm going for a lesser-known song, the opening track. I just love the way she sustains her voice on the opening note. You can just imagine Rosemary in some posh nightclub in the early 50s, wearing a glittering gown and gently setting down her champagne cocktail as she gets ready to sing. Noirish, eh?

Hey Baby

 

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5 minutes ago, Hepburn Fan said:

Kind of like the Big Band Era, where the vocal was secondary. The music was for dancing and the vocal was a plus. Notice how the singing starts a minute and a half into the song. If there is a 78 RPM version, I'd love to hear it.

You're right about the band playing almost halfway into the song before the singer starts singing, that was quite common back then.

However, in the case of the album "Blue Rose", the idea was to pair Ellington's great music and instrumentation to Clooney's lovely voice; they wanted to promote Rosemary Clooney, and gave her pretty much equal billing on the album.

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

With all the hybridization going on maybe someday they'll come up with a blue rose. They are getting close....

Well, in the meantime we can enjoy the beautiful "Angel Face" rose you and Lorna mentioned.. And also listen to "Blue Rose", the album.

Oh, and watch "the Thief of Baghdad". The not-as-good 1961 version, not the great 1940 one.

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1 hour ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

My list changes based on the latest films I've seen.  I just saw Too Late for Tears (1949), and enjoyed Lizabeth Scott's performance as the femme fatale. Also, in Born to Be Bad (1950), Joan Fontaine's character doesn't murder anyone, but she's as manipulative and amoral as they come.  I haven't seen Decoy yet, but it sounds really good.

Oddly, Born to be Bad is on today at 4:45. I wonder what the theme is today? It looked noirish, but they have I Remember Mama squeezed in there. Is it an actor?

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A lavender knockout rose can’t be too far away. 

I love Rosemary Clooney. 

Blue roses also make me think of THE GLASS MENAGERIE 

PS- cant wait to get back to my computer. This posting with my phone **** gets old fast.

Pss/ i was really being serious- I can absolutely see Otto and Hughes pulling some skullduggery like that on Jean. Another reason I can’t with ANGEL FACE is the icky backstory re: Hughes and Simmons

 

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When will it be safe to go back? Doesnt look like anytime soon. Depressing. Yeah, lavender Knock Out! I bet they are working on it as we write! (They have red, pink, white and yellow now)....

Yes, I wouldnt be surprised about anything concerning Angel Face (the movie!)

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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

When will it be safe to go back? Doesnt look like anytime soon. Depressing. Yeah, lavender Knock Out! I bet they are working on it as we write! (They have red, pink, white and yellow now)....

Yes, I wouldnt be surprised about anything concerning Angel Face (the movie!)

I am pretty sure I can return by tomorrow. 

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10 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Another nomination would be sexy/sleazy Marie Windsor as Sherry Peatty in The Killing.

Image result for marie windsor The Killing

 

Definitely in the Top Ten! And dont forget Claire Trevor in Born to Kill!

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Okay so I actually watched ANGEL FACE Sunday evening On Demand, but am only now coming to comment because I've been busy. It was a very strange experience because this is a brilliant and slightly strange movie.  The experience was enhanced because my mother and aunt were staying with me and watched as well.  I don't think they really liked it, but I think that is because they were expecting a bit of a mystery.  They did have a lot of reactions to some of the crazy in this movie, so they were entertained. 

This is another one I don't think I'd ever be motivated to see again.  I don't know.  Something about it having a bit of unpredictability made it highly predictable. :lol:  I mean once you establish that Frank sees through Diane's ploys then you know it is the one he doesn't see through that is going to cost him.  I really did love that the movie started in this manner where you felt like she was going to lure him into being her patsy, but then it flips you when right off the bat he lets her know he won't be falling for it. I really appreciated that aspect of it.  And the dynamic of how he resists her attempts becomes such a motivating factor in her interest in him to the point of that awesome final look.  Like I said, I think the movie has a lot of brilliant in it, but I doubt I would ever sit through it again, especially without having Muller's bookends attached.  Muller's bookends were great, probably the best to date.  That really added to the experience for all of us at this house.  And some of the comments here really nailed how visible things are in the film.  I agree, this movie was not trying to make Jean Simmons look all that physically attractive with those lighting setups, but I say kudos to her for chopping her hair off and refusing to be someone's plaything.

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What's goin' on, my fellow noiristas ?  It used to be, within a few minutes of Eddie's noir airing for the week, this thread would be "hot" with all the posts people'd make here. Now, for the second week in a row, hours after The Stranger has screened, we've got more crickets than a New England meadow.

I don't want to always be the first to comment here, it's like being the one who's always a little too early for a party. But then again, maybe sometimes it's those early birds who get the party going. Ok, where's the punch?  I'll start.

Loved The Stranger  ! Funny thing is, I've seen it twice before, and both those other times it left me kind of cold. But this time, I thought it was great !  (exclamation points warranted.   !  ) Maybe it had something to do with this is the best print of it I'd ever seen. But also, I seemed to get a lot more out of it this time around.

SPOILERS  SPOILERS SPOILERS   ( You've been warned.)

The Stranger grabbed my attention right from the opening credits and never let go. Even though it's not particularly action-packed and there are no rain-swept urban streets or glitzy nightclubs, just a little old New England town with trees, a cemetery, a town clock, and a gossipy old checker-playing gent who runs the local convenience store ( or its equivalent), I loved the setting. I was interested to hear Eddie inform us that it was all literally a set on the Universal (I think?) backlot. And that crazy medieval clock, virtually a major character in the film, was designed by Welles and built especially for the movie. How did they do that angel and devil thing ?? Were they models based on actual medieval clock statues? Oh well, doesn't matter, it was enormously effective.

Sometimes noir movies have obscure, even meaningless titles. (I think Vautrin's pointed this out once or twice.) But The Stranger is a perfect title for this odd and disturbing noir. I like the way it has multiple meanings: there are three strangers: the ex-Nazi, that doleful little man who knocks on Loretta Young's lacy curtained door;  there's Edward G. as the government Nazi investigator.  And there's the real stranger, Loretta's husband.  That's of course what the title is really referring to, and despite the sweet little town setting and all the kindly family and friends there, The Stranger explores an extremely dark and classically noir theme:  how an ordinary woman  (or man) can love and marry an evil person.   To me, that's the crux of the biscuit of this story:  Innocent decent Loretta Young marries the frighteningly deceptive Orson Welles, believing him to be the innocent decent history professor he's posing to be.

The most compelling aspect of this film is her gradual realization that the man she married is a vile Nazi war criminal. And this happens in stages: First, she is told by her husband that the odd little man who came to their home that day she was hanging curtains ( the same day they were married ), was a blackmailer, and that he (Charles Rankin is the name he goes by) paid him off and got rid of him. That in itself is disturbing and unsettling to her, the idea that her adored husband is hiding something. Then, stage two: he admits to her that he in fact murdered this man, claiming that he wanted to spare her and her family from scandal. Get your head around that, Loretta !  THEN, as if that's not enough, she's told by her own family  - beloved father and brother, people she absolutely trusts - as well as Eddie G., that the man she married and is in love with is a monstrous Nazi war criminal, responsible for some of the worst atrocities of the Holocaust.  It's these revelations in stages that I find interesting, and Loretta does a really good job of showing her dawning realization of who exactly she's married to in her face. First dismay, then disbelief, then confusion, then horror. And don't forget, these two have just returned from their honeymoon. She has to deal with the fact that she's been physically intimate with a Nazi war criminal. I love the way this is suggested, never openly talked about. But we get a sense of it when Charles, admitting to her that he killed the "little man" who (he falsely claims) was blackmailing him, says something like "Yes, my darling, these very hands that caressed you the night before strangled that little man."   Plus, when she finally recognizes to herself just who her husband is, she tells him to go ahead and kill her, but to do it without touching her  : "Just DON'T PUT YOUR HANDS ON ME ! !"

Sorry to go on so long about that, but it just struck me this time around that that whole aspect of the story and Loretta's character is key to what makes The Stranger a fascinating film, and also one that belongs in the noir canon.

This is really loooong, so I'll just wind up (ha! an unfortunate pun !) by saying that I love all the clock stuff. And that dramatic final scene is fantastic ! I know it's kind of over-the-top, but in a good way. And it's so perfect that it's the clock's angel, and not its demon, that finally kills Franz Kindler. An avenging angel indeed, and heaven's justice wrought on earth. Well, something like that.

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21 hours ago, TheCid said:

I didn't watch it.  Saw it many years ago and didn't like it very much.

Me too. As I said. I saw it at least twice before this weekend's viewing, and it "left me cold", as I said in my post about it. But I also said I decided to give it another chance, and that this time around I loved it. That can happen with re-viewing movies you've seen a long time ago and then "revisit". You revisit the movie and sometimes you revise your opinion of it.

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3 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

What's goin' on, my fellow noiristas ?  It used to be, within a few minutes of Eddie's noir airing for the week, this thread would be "hot" with all the posts people'd make here. Now, for the second week in a row, hours after The Stranger has screened, we've got more crickets than a New England meadow.

Seen it many times before. I didn't watch this go round (though I did see Eddy's outro). It's not a favorite, in fact I don't care all that much for either Nazi or Commie based Noirs for some reason. Though I do understand, like you mentioned, looking at it again through the lens of time changes your opinion.

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