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Hi everybody! New poster here! : )

 

Does anyone else feel that Herbert Lom is unfairly underrated?

 

I know he's most well remembered and beloved for his part in the "Pink Panther" series, as Chief Inspector Dreyfus, and I think it's great that he's so fondly remembered for that role, but feel I that his earlier career and the wide variety of roles he played are often overlooked.

 

I really took notice of Lom when I saw him in "The Ladykillers" for the first time, and I absolutely loved the movie and everyone in it, but Lom in particular really stood out to me-- he was really great! I was mesmerized by him, honestly. I know he played the stereotypical "gangster" of the group, in looks and demeanor, but I found him oddly attractive. He had great, dark eyes and a magnificent speaking voice. Aside from all that, he was just really great in the part. Lom did a wonderful job! He was cold and menacing, but really funny!

 

I also happened to see "The Seventh Veil" just a little while after this, in which Lom played Dr Larsen, and everything I thought of Lom was confirmed by his work in this film. He was quite a bit younger than in "The Ladykillers," though he's made up to look older in this film. Still, I was taken with him. He was very suave and handsome (I'm a sucker for a man in glasses). His performance was wonderful! I can see why he was cast in the role, though it was obviously intended for someone a bit older. The scene where he compares the human mind to the seven veils of Salome is really great. As much as I love James Mason, I would've made a play for the Doctor!

 

In every movie I've seen Herbert Lom in since then, he never fails to stand out and give a great performance. He was versatile, talented, handsome and had tons of presence. As great and hilarious as he was as Chief Inspector Dreyfus, he had a whole career before that in which he was also really wonderful.

 

Anyone agree?

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Ah, I love him, too! I can't tell you how many films (mostly British 1940's films) in which I didn't know he was involved, and suddenly there he is! He always was memorable, even in the smallest of roles. I think The Lady Killers was the first time I remember seeing him. Alec Guinness is one of the few actors who makes everyone else disappear for me once he's on screen, but that cast as an ensemble was outstanding, IMO.Remember the phone booth scene? How about the scene where all the fighting is going on in the room upstairs WHILE the classical record is still playing, and the old ladies are downstairs having their gathering? I could go on and on. Smart comedy! I Wish the film was better known now.

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My first "meeting" with Lom was the 1962 make of THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA as the Phantom.  When me and my buddies went to see THE PINK PANTHER a few years later and he came on, me and another buddy simultaneously blurted out, "Hey!  That's the PHANTOM guy!"

 

Sure, loved him as Dreyfus, and finally saw many of the other films he was in years before either of those two, and sure, I think that except for the crowd that shows up in these forums, he goes ruefully underappreciated.

 

As for THE LADYKILLERS, Lom's character was the darker for sure, but his ability to project that darkness while still delivering the absurdly funny is a true testament  of his well honed talent.

 

As for you GOLIGHTLY;

 

To make your first post in these forums about a much loved and admired(yet not mentioned much) talent as Lom makes you MORE than worthy of a "We're glad YOU'RE here!" welcome.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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My first "meeting" with Lom was the 1962 make of THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA as the Phantom. When me and my buddies went to see THE PINK PANTHER a few years later and he came on, me and another buddy simultaneously blurted out, "Hey! That's the PHANTOM guy!"

 

Sure, loved him as Dreyfus, and finally saw many of the other films he was in years before either of those two, and sure, I think that except for the crowd that shows up in these forums, he goes ruefully underappreciated.

 

As for THE LADYKILLERS, Lom's character was the darker for sure, but his ability to project that darkness while still delivering the absurdly funny is a true testament of his well honed talent.

 

As for you GOLIGHTLY;

 

To make your first post in these forums about a much loved and admired(yet not mentioned much) talent as Lom makes you MORE than worthy of a "We're glad YOU'RE here!" welcome. :)

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Thank you for the welcome! I'm glad to be here! :)

 

I rewatched "The Ladykillers" recently, and it left me thinking of Lom and how great he was. Anyone who can stick out in the midst of Alec Guinness And Katie Johnson as to be great!

 

I've never seen that particular version of "The Phantom of the Opera," though I really want to, but I've heard Lom is really great as The Phantom! It's a shame he wasn't given more leading roles, I think he had more than enough talent and presence to carry a film.

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Ah, I love him, too! I can't tell you how many films (mostly British 1940's films) in which I didn't know he was involved, and suddenly there he is! He always was memorable, even in the smallest of roles. I think The Lady Killers was the first time I remember seeing him. Alec Guinness is one of the few actors who makes everyone else disappear for me once he's on screen, but that cast as an ensemble was outstanding, IMO.Remember the phone booth scene? How about the scene where all the fighting is going on in the room upstairs WHILE the classical record is still playing, and the old ladies are downstairs having their gathering? I could go on and on. Smart comedy! I Wish the film was better known now.[/quote

 

I know what you mean, he really does seem to just pop up! I'm always delighted to him, though, 'cause you just know it's going to be worth watching for Lom alone, if nothing else.

 

Oh my goodness, I love the phone booth scene! It was hilarious! The group all crammed inside, The frantic screaming for the "Major", it was wonderful! Pure comedy!

 

I also love the little bit where Louis tries to scare Mrs Wilberforce from going to the police by saying, "I'll tell them she planned the job. I'll tell them she planned the big one." *points at Mrs Wilberforce* "The East Castle Street Job!". He's obviously saying it to scare her, but the very idea of anybody ever believing this sweet little elderly lady of such things is so absurdly hilarious! Lom's delivery of that line is great! I love how the men are gently chuckling beside him. Even they see how ansurd and funny it is!

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I didn't even know Lom was still alive--or even had such a nasty Hammer-era reputation--until "Inspector Dreyfus" showed up with Christopher Walken in 1983's "The Dead Zone".  

 

(Which I assume everyone went back and watched at least once during the Trump campaign...)

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I didn't even know Lom was still alive--or even had such a nasty Hammer-era reputation--until "Inspector Dreyfus" showed up with Christopher Walken in 1983's "The Dead Zone".

 

(Which I assume everyone went back and watched at least once during the Trump campaign...)

Yes, Mr Lom lived a long life, passing away at 95 a few years back. He had a long, pretty extensive career. Dramas, noir, horror, epics, comedies, A movies and B movies, a television show. He also played Napoleon a few times. Quite the career!

 

That's a great scene from "The Dead Zone."

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I remember watching Agatha Christie's Marple: The Murder at the Vicarage (2004) (Had to look up his credits to figure out what show it was) and thinking...man, that actor looks familiar, but who is he? My late Mother was watching too, and usually was pretty good with putting names with faces, she didn't know either. Got such a kick when I saw the credits and saw Herbert Lom's name! He hadn't acted in a decade at that point, And I too thought he had passed on by then... I saw the movie below last year....awesome title that really had nothing to do with the film's subject matter. Felt like the film missed the mark a bit, great idea for a film at least, and Herbert had the lead.... Hell Is Sold Out (1951)
1h 25min| Drama | 1952 (USA)


MV5BNjQ1MDIyODc1N15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMzk4

A book is sent to the publishers under the name of "Danges", a popular writer, long believed to be dead. The real Danges turns up and meets the new authoress using his name.

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