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Speaking Wisdom To Total Blockneads


Palmerin
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In the late 60s there was a public service commercial that consisted of a boy playing with his dog, succeeding in school, kissing his girlfriend, and at the end going to the beach with his girl, now his wife, and their son, while in the soundtrack alluring and teasing voices told him of how much fun illegal drugs were, and how he was wasting his life away by not being an addict. I was only a tween at the time, but I understood that ad immediately: that youngster was having a happy and fulfilling life without any need for that crutch that is substance abuse. Unfortunately that message was too subtle, for it generated a very hostile reaction; people actually thought it was advocating drug abuse! Public health, totally taken by surprise at such a reaction, cancelled the ad because it was obvious that they were DEALING WITH MORONIC PEOPLE (Peter Falk in IT'S A MAD MAD MAD MAD WORLD).

What about you? Do you recall instances of a point being massively missed by people who clearly can't tell the difference between their right hand and their left foot?

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What about you? Do you recall instances of a point being massively missed by people who clearly can't tell the difference between their right hand and their left foot?

 

May I direct you to the Off-Topic Forums, where there are daily instances of this, with entire threads devoted to missing the point on virtually every subject.

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I don't seem to recall the PSA you refer to, but it's not surprising that some people would take it out of context.

 

I don't mean that the content lays open the possibility, but that's just how some people are.  Some film makers also tried to sway young audience members away from what may be considered a depraved lifestyle with the opposite effect.  I call it the "Ron O'Neal syndrome".

 

Remember O'Neal's movie SUPER FLY in which he played a character called Priest who was a big time cocaine dealer who had a flashy car, any woman he wanted, money up the wazoo, and the fear and respect from everyone around him.  But O'Neal attempted to show, through the events of the movie, and his character's disillusionment and struggle to leave the drug business, that this type of endeavor was a poor choice and he even considered it, along with director GORDON PARKS , to be an anti drug film.  But the offshoot was that many young black men started trying to emulate the movie's main character and a sharp rise in drug related crime and drug use was the result.

 

On a more personal level, I ran across this sort of thing with people concerning other matters.  For instance, one day when the subject came up in conversation, I off hand mentioned that I didn't support capital punishment.  My sister in law at the time shot back, "Oh, so you think murderers should all just get off Scott free?" .  Funny, I didn't recall ever saying THAT, but like I said, it's just how some people are.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Well Palmerin, at the risk at having your thread here moved to "Blowhard Central"(aka: the Off-Topic forum) and which is probably a better place for it anyway, YEAH, a certain instance in which a whole lot of people getting all bent out of shape because they seemed unable to comprehend a public health issue which was presented to them in a logical manner comes to my mind here, alright.

 

I'm thinkin' of a what happened to a former Surgeon General of these United States, one Joycelyn Elders, and who after having the  "audacity" to suggest that instead of kids engaging in sex with others, the kids should instead be taught that sexually self-indulging themselves would be a safer alternative in these regards.

 

(...but of course, and although she was right about this, the firestorm of controversy which surrounded her after she made this comment would doom the poor lady's governmental career and after her boss at the time, a guy who sometimes was known as "Bubba" and who evidently had his OWN ideas about sexual matters, didn't have the guts to tell those people who couldn't understand the logic of her remarks to go, umm, well, YOU know, and thus asked for her resignation)

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To further harp on a similar topic Darg, there are those who raise a hue and cry when it's suggested that sexually active teen girls be afforded access to contraceptives( thus sharply reducing the incidents of teen-age abortion) citing they think it will incite teen girls to be MORE sexually active, or at least inspire them to begin.  THEY think that teaching abstinence instead is the answer.  but really....did you ever know ANY parents that told their kids, "Go ON kids, do it like RABBITS!"?   Really, they didn't HAVE to.  They already WERE.

 

Oh. and as if telling your kids NOT to do ANYTHING means they'll readily OBEY?

 

 

A lot of people walk around with their heads in the clouds, but TOO many have their heads up some OTHER location.

 

 

Sepiatone

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:D

 

Good one Rich!

 

Pro Nazi?   Those guys must have not got past the title.  What  I heard was more backhanded snark in the form of commiseration.  But what's true is that as(we were told in school) most Russian citizens were NOT communists, neither were all German citizens Nazis.  My Grandmother told me that during WWII and since the family shortened the family name from KUROWSKI to KRAUSE, THEY used to get a lot of flack from people thinking THEY were German.

 

Today marks the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, which directed all Japanese citizens of Japanese descent be placed in internment camps.  It's a dark acknowledgement for the U.S. when looked back on over the years, but a Japanese acquaintance of mine told me his father, who spent time in one of the camps back then, told HIM that for many years after the war he was bitter and resentful about it, but when the '60's rolled around, and after seeing how Americans treated their OWN U.S. citizens who were black and Spanish, the Japanese were probably safer in the camps.  So his Dad let the bitterness go.

 

 

Sepiatone

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May I direct you to the Off-Topic Forums, where there are daily instances of this, with entire threads devoted to missing the point on virtually every subject.

Of course, not all of us who participate on those threads regularly miss the point. I, for one, am virtually always precisely on target.

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This song was taken by some 1940 listeners to be pro-German propaganda and eventually was banned by the BBC:

 

 

This reaction and response to Noel Coward's cheeky little song reminds me of the similar response and reaction Winston Churchill reportedly had to Powell and Pressburger's wonderful THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP and once he was shown that film.

 

Supposedly the pudgy little British bulldog Prime Minister hated the film, and because the story included a "good German", and thus feared the more subtly expressed pro-British sentiment contained within the film would be lost on all the blockheads who might see it.

 

(...and ya know, considering the fact that blockheads in general have a tougher time not only understanding the concept of "Subtlety" and let alone appreciating it, the little pudgy SOB was probably RIGHT!!!)

 

LOL

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I am still trying to figure out what a blocknead is.

 

Look at your keyboard for a second here, Rich.

 

And now, notice if you will how close the "h" key is to the "n" key.

 

I'm thinkin' this might explain this.

 

(...well, it's either THAT, or down in Puerto Rico they call people a little slow on the ol' uptake "blockneads" instead of "blockheads")

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:D

 

Good one Rich!

 

 

Today marks the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, which directed all Japanese citizens of Japanese descent be placed in internment camps.  It's a dark acknowledgement for the U.S. when looked back on over the years, but a Japanese acquaintance of mine told me his father, who spent time in one of the camps back then, told HIM that for many years after the war he was bitter and resentful about it, but when the '60's rolled around, and after seeing how Americans treated their OWN U.S. citizens who were black and Spanish, the Japanese were probably safer in the camps.  So his Dad let the bitterness go.

 

 

Sepiatone

It may have been on PBS' "American Experience" many years ago, but whichever program it was said there were many American-born Japanese people who willingly denied their heritage to pass themselves off as Chinese to avoid being placed in one of those internment camps.  German-born people or those who had German surnames were harassed in many parts of America during WW1.  My Mom's side of the family is Italian, but I never heard any stories about my grandparents being targeted or ridiculed by others during WW2.  Of course, my parents were of the generation that never spoke of anything that bordered on the unpleasant to either me or my siblings when it came to stuff like that.

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It may have been on PBS' "American Experience" many years ago, but whichever program it was said there were many American-born Japanese people who willingly denied their heritage to pass themselves off as Chinese to avoid being placed in one of those internment camps.  German-born people or those who had German surnames were harassed in many parts of America during WW1.  My Mom's side of the family is Italian, but I never heard any stories about my grandparents being targeted or ridiculed by others during WW2.  Of course, my parents were of the generation that never spoke of anything that bordered on the unpleasant to either me or my siblings when it came to stuff like that.

Chinese and Japanese look very different. In most instances I can tell the difference.

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Chinese and Japanese look very different. In most instances I can tell the difference.

 

So, do you use the same method that I do here, DGF?

 

(...if they look like Paul Muni in THE GOOD EARTH they're Chinese, BUT is they look like Mickey Rooney in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S they're obviously Japanese?!)

 

LOL

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Sepiatone:

 

I like to suggest that we should try the similar approach with alcohol education: teach the kids to drink responsibly, since they're going to drink anyway. Needless to say, the response is usually absolute horror.

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It may have been on PBS' "American Experience" many years ago, but whichever program it was said there were many American-born Japanese people who willingly denied their heritage to pass themselves off as Chinese to avoid being placed in one of those internment camps.  German-born people or those who had German surnames were harassed in many parts of America during WW1.  My Mom's side of the family is Italian, but I never heard any stories about my grandparents being targeted or ridiculed by others during WW2.  Of course, my parents were of the generation that never spoke of anything that bordered on the unpleasant to either me or my siblings when it came to stuff like that.

 

Midwesty, this lack of the ridicule and/or persecution upon Italian-Americans during WWII within this country and of which you speak can maybe be best exemplified by the character J. Carroll Naish plays in the 1943 film SAHARA, and who seemed to personify the prevailing American public thought that while the Italian government of the time had aligned itself with the Axis powers, most Americans felt the vast majority of the Italian people did not support their government in this regard.

 

(...but you probably already knew this, didn't ya)

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I think it's funny that now that we have a heroin problem in the white upper classes that we actually have a heroin problem in the United States. I was under the impression that we had a serious heroin problem in the United States for the last 40 years or so.

 

But now it's a serious problem and we should all be doing something about it. We should have various drugs and procedures in the emergency room ready for these young white upper- class heroin addicts.

 

When this problem was primarily in black ghettos and Latino barrios it was simply an "urban" problem with poor low life people who didn't have enough sense to stay away from addictive drugs.

 

(And I'm not going to even go into the public's crack cocaine Frenzy of yesteryear.)

 

There was a public outcry against methadone clinics;there was a public outcry against clean needles - - so that the addicts would not get an AIDS.

 

But now that the addicts are from a different race and in a different class --well we're hearing a different story.

 

The unfortunate issue with the United States is that you have to realize that so many of the ills of society start at the bottom and grow to the top.

 

Whether it's teenage pregnancy or drug abuse.

 

I think it's funny how time changes the society's perspective on different issues.

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I don't mean that the content lays open the possibility, but that's just how some people are.  Some film makers also tried to sway young audience members away from what may be considered a depraved lifestyle with the opposite effect.  I call it the "Ron O'Neal syndrome".

 

Remember O'Neal's movie SUPER FLY in which he played a character called Priest who was a big time cocaine dealer who had a flashy car, any woman he wanted, money up the wazoo, and the fear and respect from everyone around him.  But O'Neal attempted to show, through the events of the movie, and his character's disillusionment and struggle to leave the drug business, that this type of endeavor was a poor choice and he even considered it, along with director GORDON PARKS , to be an anti drug film.  But the offshoot was that many young black men started trying to emulate the movie's main character and a sharp rise in drug related crime and drug use was the result.

 

 

 

Sepiatone

 

There used to be a joke that when watching films like this one,  Scarface (1983) for example, Young people would simply cut off the last ten minutes of the film. Before the eventual fall of the "hero".

 

To me the only PSA's that really work are the ones we see to today: The woman with the tracheotomy, the man with the large scar across his chest. There are others but, they are too graphic to post. But, that's what it would take to get people to see the err of their ways. 

 

That subtle artistic style. I wonder if its more about the filmmaker being cute than actually getting someone to change their behavior.

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I don't seem to recall the PSA you refer to, but it's not surprising that some people would take it out of context.

 

I don't mean that the content lays open the possibility, but that's just how some people are. Some film makers also tried to sway young audience members away from what may be considered a depraved lifestyle with the opposite effect. I call it the "Ron O'Neal syndrome".

 

Remember O'Neal's movie SUPER FLY in which he played a character called Priest who was a big time cocaine dealer who had a flashy car, any woman he wanted, money up the wazoo, and the fear and respect from everyone around him. But O'Neal attempted to show, through the events of the movie, and his character's disillusionment and struggle to leave the drug business, that this type of endeavor was a poor choice and he even considered it, along with director GORDON PARKS , to be an anti drug film. But the offshoot was that many young black men started trying to emulate the movie's main character and a sharp rise in drug related crime and drug use was the result.

 

On a more personal level, I ran across this sort of thing with people concerning other matters. For instance, one day when the subject came up in conversation, I off hand mentioned that I didn't support capital punishment. My sister in law at the time shot back, "Oh, so you think murderers should all just get off Scott free?" . Funny, I didn't recall ever saying THAT, but like I said, it's just how some people are.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

I think the cause and effect in your comment is too simplistic. If black men in the ghetto see something like this in a movie and they don't have any real opportunities in the mainstream world to make a decent and honest living, then that kind of movie is going to appeal to them particularly, more than it would to a person who was born in the mainstream.

 

Life is all about options and choices and when you have limited options and limited choices, then you can be more easily influenced by a film like that.

 

BTW-- I'm against capital punishment as well. It simply doesn't make any sense to me.

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BTW-- I'm against capital punishment as well. It simply doesn't make any sense to me.

 

Now, how can you say such a thing, Princess???

 

Ya see, I once watched this one flick in which as a final little favor to an old boyhood friend of his(I think he was a priest or somethin') this one dude on the way to Ol' Sparky starts actin' like a big crybaby.

 

And THEN when the little street punks who really admired the dude who got electrocuted heard about how he turned yellow at the end, they all transformed themselves into good little citizens from there on out!

 

So are you tryin' to tell me here that THAT was all just Hollywood make-believe and that THIS sort'a thing doesn't happen in REAL life???

 

(...as they say in another movie I once saw, "Say it ain't so, Joe!"...well, Princess I guess in this case)

 

;)

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I think the cause and effect in your comment is too simplistic. If black men in the ghetto see something like this in a movie and they don't have any real opportunities in the mainstream world to make a decent and honest living, then that kind of movie is going to appeal to them particularly, more than it would to a person who was born in the mainstream.

 

Life is all about options and choices and when you have limited options and limited choices, then you can be more easily influenced by a film like that.

 

BTW-- I'm against capital punishment as well. It simply doesn't make any sense to me.

 

The point Princess, that when the movie came out, the opportunities for young black men were more available than they were a mere decade earlier.  Also the point was that the film had the opposite effect than O'Neal and Parks had hoped for.  Even some older black men I was working with at the time( we were all 21 to 25 years old) , and recall, they were co-workers and  had at least a high school education, but they too, looked at Priest as some sort of "hero".  So don't play into it.......

 

There was a guy in my Southwest Detroit neighborhood who went around trying to sell fruit he had picked up that had fallen off the trucks at the Fort/Green truck terminal.  When talking to him I discovered that he and I were born three months apart( me being that much older).  Now, HE tried handing me the excuse that he was a panhandler because, "You know how hard it is for a black man to get a job, don't ya?"  I didn't buy it because on the day I hired into The Clark Ave.Cadillac plant, I was hired in with four other guys.  And I was the only WHITE guy!

 

And SUPER FLY came out just NINE MONTHS after we hired in, so don't TRY to run that crusty old "lack of opportunities for young black men" jive past me.

 

 

Sepiatone

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