Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Memorial Day and No Vietnam movies, Again


ElCid
 Share

Recommended Posts

The Memorial Day Marathon starts on May 26 and goes through May 29.

Once again, a Memorial Day with NO movies about Vietnam.  Mostly just the same old movies TCM always shows.

Jump into Hell, 1955, and The Quiet American, 1958, are two early ones that TCM has shown in the past, but not on Memorial Day.

 

http://www.tcm.com/schedule/index.html?tz=est&sdate=2017-05-26

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are we gonna go through all this AGAIN?

 

Getting near time for complaints about no DESERT STORM movies.

 

 

Sepiatone

Sorry, but still don't understand why TCM refuses to show Vietnam War movies on Memorial Day, especially when it is spread over four days.

I have sent an email to TCM about it, but they never respond.

As for going through it again?  Why not, that is a hallmark of this forum.  Also, if TCM does a special, that makes it topical again.

As for Desert Storm, why not?  I was in that one as well.

Perhaps TCM should set up a schedule of 50% WW II and 50% other wars since WW I and make sure to include all of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not mean to imply why it is important to have Viet-Nam movies but could you supply a few titles? 

 

I am one of the few who is ambivalent about war movies.  War movies tend to have mostly male actors, guns, and the sound of bullets, bombs and explosions.  I become weary of the sameness after a few titles.  Don't get me wrong.  I do like some war movies.  I just do not want to see a marathon of one after another. 

 

I remember one year TCM did not program war movies over the Memorial Day weekend.  In its stead they had a Clint Eastwood marathon of films and man did I enjoy it!!!  Some of our members in TCM Nation were outraged by this programming decision.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, but still don't understand why TCM refuses to show Vietnam War movies on Memorial Day, especially when it is spread over four days.

I have sent an email to TCM about it, but they never respond.

As for going through it again?  Why not, that is a hallmark of this forum.  Also, if TCM does a special, that makes it topical again.

As for Desert Storm, why not?  I was in that one as well.

Perhaps TCM should set up a schedule of 50% WW II and 50% other wars since WW I and make sure to include all of them.

 

Sorry.  Did not know you were a veteran of ANY combat.  Thanks for that.  And happy you made it through.

 

I suppose maybe the at home conflict over Viet Nam might have something to do with TCM's aversion to Viet Nam movies.  I couldn't say for sure.  Maybe the scant movies made about it are ones they haven't secured any rights to.  But your frustration is understandable, and I wholeheartedly agree. 

 

It doesn't MATTER whether or not many feel that Viet Nam wasn't "our" war.  American soldiers fought and died in the conflict, and THAT'S what's important.

 

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I for one would like to see a Memorial Day weekend with no war movies.

 

I disagree with the notion that dishing out violence on behalf of the state is both necessary and sufficient to be heroic.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry.  Did not know you were a veteran of ANY combat.  Thanks for that.  And happy you made it through.

 

I suppose maybe the at home conflict over Viet Nam might have something to do with TCM's aversion to Viet Nam movies.  I couldn't say for sure.  Maybe the scant movies made about it are ones they haven't secured any rights to.  But your frustration is understandable, and I wholeheartedly agree. 

 

It doesn't MATTER whether or not many feel that Viet Nam wasn't "our" war.  American soldiers fought and died in the conflict, and THAT'S what's important.

 

 

Sepiatone

Thank you.

Actually there are a goodly number of Vietnam War movies, even without counting the documentaries and foreign films.  Search Vietnam War movies for examples.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do not mean to imply why it is important to have Viet-Nam movies but could you supply a few titles? 

 

I am one of the few who is ambivalent about war movies.  War movies tend to have mostly male actors, guns, and the sound of bullets, bombs and explosions.  I become weary of the sameness after a few titles.  Don't get me wrong.  I do like some war movies.  I just do not want to see a marathon of one after another. 

 

I remember one year TCM did not program war movies over the Memorial Day weekend.  In its stead they had a Clint Eastwood marathon of films and man did I enjoy it!!!  Some of our members in TCM Nation were outraged by this programming decision.

Search Vietnam War movies for examples.  Or Vietnam War movies by 1970's, 1980' 1990's etc. They are sometimes broken down into top 10, top 30 or just long lists of them.

A few:  Platoon, Hamburger Hill, Full Metal Jacket, Go Tell the Spartans (my favorite), The Quiet American (two versions), The Ugly American, Jump Into Hell (French in English), Coming Home, Casualties of War, Good Morning Vietnam, Gardens of Stone, The Deer Hunter, We Were Soldiers, Air America. 

Of course there are many such as Missing in Action, Rambo, etc. that I don't really consider Vietnam War movies, just action movies set in Vietnam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, but still don't understand why TCM refuses to show Vietnam War movies on Memorial Day, especially when it is spread over four days.

I have sent an email to TCM about it, but they never respond.

As for going through it again?  Why not, that is a hallmark of this forum.  Also, if TCM does a special, that makes it topical again.

As for Desert Storm, why not?  I was in that one as well.

Perhaps TCM should set up a schedule of 50% WW II and 50% other wars since WW I and make sure to include all of them.

 

Couldn't it be because the USA was NOT successful in Vietnam?    At least with Korea half of the country was retained for democracy.

 

I assume the majority of Vietnam war movies are anti-war movies (some may even feel anti-American).    Couldn't that be the reason TCM doesn't feature these films on Memorial Day and instead the focus is mostly on 'we kicked A' WWII war films?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couldn't it be because the USA was NOT successful in Vietnam?    At least with Korea half of the country was retained for democracy.

 

I assume the majority of Vietnam war movies are anti-war movies (some may even feel anti-American).    Couldn't that be the reason TCM doesn't feature these films on Memorial Day and instead the focus is mostly on 'we kicked A' WWII war films?

Could be.  Unlike WW II and even Korea, the Vietnam movies came about in a new era when "honesty" over rode propaganda and entertainment.

There are a lot of Vietnam movies that are not anti-war as such, but are more honest about warfare or politics or just how the people in the war lived and were affected.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I revived this thread as we approach Memorial Day and I still don't see any Viet Nam movies on the schedule (please correct me if I'm wrong).

 

I do especially recommend STEEL HELMET which takes place in Korea.

 

There's always Veterans Day where we honor all the veterans and a big thank you to all our posters who are veterans.  My husband was a Viet Nam vet (1965-66).  Maybe then TCM can show a Viet Nam movie or two.

 

 Memorial Day is to honor those who didn't make it out.  Enjoy your hot dogs, cookouts and mattress sales, everybody!  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I revived this thread as we approach Memorial Day and I still don't see any Viet Nam movies on the schedule (please correct me if I'm wrong).

 

I do especially recommend STEEL HELMET which takes place in Korea.

 

There's always Veterans Day where we honor all the veterans and a big thank you to all our posters who are veterans.  My husband was a Viet Nam vet (1965-66).  Maybe then TCM can show a Viet Nam movie or two.

 

 Memorial Day is to honor those who didn't make it out.  Enjoy your hot dogs, cookouts and mattress sales, everybody!  

To elaborate on this.  We should remember that Memorial Day is time to remember and honor those who died in service to our country and their families.  Veterans Day is time to honor veterans and their families.  Armed Forces Day is the day to honor those currently serving and their families.

Have a good Memorial Day - and spend a moment thinking of those "who didn't make it out" as Christine said.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, but still don't understand why TCM refuses to show Vietnam War movies on Memorial Day, especially when it is spread over four days.

I have sent an email to TCM about it, but they never respond.

As for going through it again?  Why not, that is a hallmark of this forum.  Also, if TCM does a special, that makes it topical again.

As for Desert Storm, why not?  I was in that one as well.

Perhaps TCM should set up a schedule of 50% WW II and 50% other wars since WW I and make sure to include all of them.

We don't get many movies out of the 70s don't you know, that decade has a lot of controversial (to morally conservative types) movies with drug use, free love, and oh my god, do I even have to type the word, "nudity". I'd be surprised if it doesn't get *****.  :D

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We don't get many movies out of the 70s don't you know, that decade has a lot of controversial (to morally conservative types) movies with drug use, free love, and oh my god, do I even have to type the word, "nudity". I'd be surprised if it doesn't get *****.  :D

TCM has lots of movies from the 70's and 80's as well as ones with nudity, profanity, drug use, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TCM has lots of movies from the 70's and 80's as well as ones with nudity, profanity, drug use, etc.

 

I can't agree that TCM has 'lots of movies from the 70s and 80s'.   Lots???     I assume actual programming data on an annual basis would show that < 8% or so of TCM's programming are films from that era.     That to me is not a 'lot' but instead much closer to some.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I neglected to include MEN IN WAR (playing now as I write this) as recommended war flicks.  Tough no-nonsense film about the Korean war.  I have it on DVR and will probably watch the whole thing later tonight.  Love Robert Ryan, as always, with fine supporting cast.  Maltin only gives it two and a half stars (sometimes from his reviews I wonder if he and his staff even watch these flicks) and I'm bumping it up to three and a half.  TCM is running at again in July.  Anthony Mann directed, so we know it's good.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't agree that TCM has 'lots of movies from the 70s and 80s'.   Lots???     I assume actual programming data on an annual basis would show that < 8% or so of TCM's programming are films from that era.     That to me is not a 'lot' but instead much closer to some.

That's one of the pluses of Now Playing, you get to see the data on a lot of movies.  There seem to be a lot of movies showing up from the 70's and 80's and few from the 90's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's one of the pluses of Now Playing, you get to see the data on a lot of movies.  There seem to be a lot of movies showing up from the 70's and 80's and few from the 90's.

 

But on an annual basis what percentage of ALL films shown are from the 70s and 80s?   

 

It looks like by saying 'a lot' you were comparing the 70s and 80s to the 90s.     Yea,  TCM shows a lot more films from the 70s and 80s than the 90s.     TCM also shows more films from the 1990s than they do the 1890s.     I'm only being a wise guy because your reply to cigarjoe implied what he stated was incorrect and I just don't see that.    I.e. "We don't get many movies out of the 70s".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But on an annual basis what percentage of ALL films shown are from the 70s and 80s?   

 

It looks like by saying 'a lot' you were comparing the 70s and 80s to the 90s.     Yea,  TCM shows a lot more films from the 70s and 80s than the 90s.     TCM also shows more films from the 1990s than they do the 1890s.     I'm only being a wise guy because your reply to cigarjoe implied what he stated was incorrect and I just don't see that.    I.e. "We don't get many movies out of the 70s".

I interpreted his comment as referring both to TCM not showing movies from the 70's and 80's and also because they had nudity, profanity, etc.

My response implied that these are not adequate reasons for TCM to not show any Vietnam War movies over this 3 or 4 day period.  Also, that just in case, movies from the 70's and 80's have been shown often on TCM.

I was not comparing the 70's and 80's to the 90's at all.  I was indicating that not only does TCM show movies from the 70's and 80's, but also from the 90's.

 

Of course I guess we could start parsing out what lots, some, few, etc. means compared to the thousands (?) of movies TCM has shown?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I interpreted his comment as referring both to TCM not showing movies from the 70's and 80's and also because they had nudity, profanity, etc.

My response implied that these are not adequate reasons for TCM to not show any Vietnam War movies over this 3 or 4 day period.  Also, that just in case, movies from the 70's and 80's have been shown often on TCM.

I was not comparing the 70's and 80's to the 90's at all.  I was indicating that not only does TCM show movies from the 70's and 80's, but also from the 90's.

 

Of course I guess we could start parsing out what lots, some, few, etc. means compared to the thousands (?) of movies TCM has shown?

 

Sorry but I work in the statistical data field and yea,  if one uses terms like lots, some, few, many; they get slapped down hard.    But even in lay usage terms 'lots' implies (at least to me),   over 20%.     I use percentage since that adds a relative weigh to each of these terms.   In fact one of the questions we ask new hires is to rank each of these terms on a percentage basis.   There is no right answer of course but one can get insight into how one views data based on their ranking.  E.g. I rank these terms in this order;  few, some,  many,  lots, and than s-loads (ok 'most' which implies at least > 51%).

 

I do understand your point now;  that since TCM does show SOME 70s films the fact TCM is showing NO 70s war films as part of the tribute can't be explained as 'because TCM doesn't favor 70s films'  (which can be implied from cigarjoe's post).

 

I'm sticking to the reason I gave before;  that 70s war films tend to have anti-war themes and that isn't really appropriate on a holiday to honor those that have died doing service for their country.       (kind of like that Ray Teal comment made to Harold Russell in The Best Years of Our Lives).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fedya said: I for one would like to see a Memorial Day weekend with no war movies. I disagree with the notion that dishing out violence on behalf of the state is both necessary and sufficient to be heroic.

 

I think the point is those who are willing to fight for their beliefs are heroic. They've put their lives on the line for others' welfare-the most noble thing they could possibly do. The families who support & sacrifice should be included as well.

The Cid said: We should remember that Memorial Day is time to remember and honor those who died in service to our country and their families.  Veterans Day is time to honor veterans and their families.  Armed Forces Day is the day to honor those currently serving and their families.
Thanks for succinctly reminding those who just see it as a day off with pay to have a picnic.
My poppies ALWAYS bloom for Memorial Day as a symbolic reminder of the sacrifice of others for our behalf. I try living the day to it's fullest, but my mind always wanders back to thinking of those we lost.
My first thought of "why no Viet Nam movies?" is because as such a recent war, movies made about it would be more recent too.
Film rights for newer movies are more difficult/expensive, the packages they are included in would contain "less classic" titles that don't fit well into TCM's classic film agenda, and would contain much more swearing and other limitations for broadcast. So, in other words, more of a PIA to show than the same old standards.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think TCM should show two particular  Vietnam movies: "Coming Home." and " Born on the Fourth of July."

 

They might serve to offset their file of twenty or thirty movies that glorify war and only show it as a grand sacrifice, saving us all from Nazi/Japanese/communist rule.  War can be that, but it can also be a waste of life and limb in lost causes that only increase our number of enemies, and lives lost in sacrifice to the  political and economic needs of the one percent. 

 

I have nothing but respect for the people who serve, my husband is retired Air Force after 22 years, but young people need to see a little bit of the other side before they make the decision to join up based on three days of John Wayne movies.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I think the point is those who are willing to fight for their beliefs are heroic. They've put their lives on the line for others' welfare-the most noble thing they could possibly do. The families who support & sacrifice should be included as well.

 

And perhaps that's why some might NOT see Viet Nam war movies as an inclusion in Memorial Day presentations.

 

Those guys WEREN'T fighting for their beliefs.  In fact, the bulk of them were DRAFTED and DIDN'T wan to BE there in the first place.

 

I know I'll get "flamed" for this, but Viet Nam, Desert Storm and the more recent fighting in Iraq were NOT cases of where soldiers were fighting in defense of THEIR country, as the U.S. wasn't in danger or threat from those places.

 

But personally, my feeling is that since those men died fighting while in the U.S. military is reason enough to include honoring them on Memorial Day. 

 

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And perhaps that's why some might NOT see Viet Nam war movies as an inclusion in Memorial Day presentations.

 

Those guys WEREN'T fighting for their beliefs.  In fact, the bulk of them were DRAFTED and DIDN'T wan to BE there in the first place.

 

I know I'll get "flamed" for this, but Viet Nam, Desert Storm and the more recent fighting in Iraq were NOT cases of where soldiers were fighting in defense of THEIR country, as the U.S. wasn't in danger or threat from those places.

 

But personally, my feeling is that since those men died fighting while in the U.S. military is reason enough to include honoring them on Memorial Day. 

 

 

Sepiatone

One of the first things you learn in the military is that soldiers fight for each other, not in defense of their countries or freedom and so forth.  You can also add in a sense of duty or honor.

 

In actuality, the US has not fought to defend the US since the War of 1812.  Even WW I and WW II had little actual threat to the US. Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, the Phillipines, etc. to keep the US out of the war to defend the colonial powers in Pacific.  Backfired, but that is another story.

 

Most soldiers in all US wars up until 1975 were drafted or joined before they got drafted to get a better deal.  This includes WW I and WW II.  My father and six uncles all could have served in the military in WW II.  Only two did and the others found ways to be deferred as being in "war production."

 

Even today, the military has to offer very substantial incentives to encourage people to join.

 

No one wanted to be there, drafted or not, in any war.  Leastways, not the guys actually getting shot at.

 

Having been in both and studied both, Vietnam was a mistake but Desert Storm (Persian Gulf War) was not.  US and rest of the world came to the defense of an "ally" and to prevent Iraq from controlling all the oil in the Gulf States.  That would have led to Saddam controlling oil prices for most of the world.  It would have also placed tremendous pressure on Israel if Saddam had control of the Middle East oil wealth outside Iran.

I will agree that Bush/Cheney's Irag War was a mistake.  Afghanistan is a little more complicated as it was a haven for Al Qaeda.

 

"But personally, my feeling is that since those men died fighting while in the U.S. military is reason enough to include honoring them on Memorial Day." 

That is absolutely true.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think some might to search movies about Vietnam War just to see how many there are.  Most have been in 80's or later, but some good ones in the 70's.

One of my favorites is Go Tell the Spartans from 1978 and is set in 1964.  Another is The Quiet American from 1958.  TCM has showed it sometime during the past month, so it is available.

One of the worst is The Green Berets, but that is another story.

 

As for how they portray the war, a sign of the changes in America were that movies about war became more realistic rather than a barely disquised part of American propaganda effort during WW II.  Movies about Korea are more realistic even.

In the late 70's up until now, the American people are more accepting of "more accurate" war movies.

While Coming Home and Born on the Fourth of July are very good movies with compelling stories, no reason not to show other war movies that might inform and educate while entertaining.

 

Perhaps TCM can do an expanded broadcast for Veterans Day and show movies about wartime and peacetime service, dramas and comedies, etc. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...