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Eddie Muller


GordonCole
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If you like your lager lite, instead of a deep, richly layered brew like Guinness, then you might prefer your noir lite too, and Eddie Muller as host would be just your cup of tea, albeit in a watered-down version with a lot of milk.

Ergo, Mr. Muller was an excellent choice for hosting duties for neophyte noir fans and he seems to have fully absorbed the concept of “An expert is someone who knows how to be wrong with a lot of authority” as his guest on one of Muller’s TCM Wine Club segments was extolling to him in praise of such limited standards of knowledge and expertise.
 

But for the dedicated and more intense noir aficionado, a host with a more expansive knowledge of film, the sensibilities of a Frank or more seasoned scholars of literature and cinema and a less banal perception of the underpinnings of the genre beyond the superficial dark dames mode, would be admirable in the future. May I suggest that next time TCM begins a noir weekly series that they hire an alternative host with second opinion status as to what constitutes the entire noir spectrum to give viewers a counterpoint to the simplistic Noir Lite mode.

It might also be refreshing to see antecedents discussed as in the literature preceding the film history of tales like Renoir's “La Chienne” by author Fouchardiere or the Zola based “La Bete Humaine” or even less discussed “poets of the wet streets and turgid tabloids” with the work of Kersh, Hamilton, Genet, West, Huysman, Conrad and Gide [whose “The Counterfeiters” predates later facsimile scripts turned into films] or someone like Thompson and his “The Killer Inside Me”.

And just to be entirely revolutionary, it might be time to see a female hostess with serious noir chops, for the next Serie Noire TCM installment, instead of the all-male contingent who run foundations and continually host such discussions, and all seem to resemble the bland John Forbes character in the “Pitfall” film. This way there would be a tangible noir milieu for both sects to languorously dwell in and enjoy on TCM, for both the beginning casual fan and the more devout follower.

Speaking of wine, for some TCM viewers,  Film Noir Brut is more appealing than Film Noir Demi-Sec.

Thanks, TCM for giving an outlet here for both types of thought from the cable subscribers to your network.

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If you like your lager lite, instead of a deep, richly layered brew like Guinness, then you might prefer your noir lite too, and Eddie Muller as host would be just your cup of tea, albeit in a watered-down version with a lot of milk.

 

Ergo, Mr. Muller was an excellent choice for hosting duties for neophyte noir fans and he seems to have fully absorbed the concept of “An expert is someone who knows how to be wrong with a lot of authority” as his guest on one of Muller’s TCM Wine Club segments was extolling to him in praise of such limited standards of knowledge and expertise.

 

But for the dedicated and more intense noir aficionado, a host with a more expansive knowledge of film, the sensibilities of a Frank or more seasoned scholars of literature and cinema and a less banal perception of the underpinnings of the genre beyond the superficial dark dames mode, would be admirable in the future. May I suggest that next time TCM begins a noir weekly series that they hire an alternative host with second opinion status as to what constitutes the entire noir spectrum to give viewers a counterpoint to the simplistic Noir Lite mode.

 

It might also be refreshing to see antecedents discussed as in the literature preceding the film history of tales like Renoir's “La Chienne” by author Fouchardiere or the Zola based “La Bete Humaine” or even less discussed “poets of the wet streets and turgid tabloids” with the work of Kersh, Hamilton, Genet, West, Huysman, Conrad and Gide [whose “The Counterfeiters” predates later facsimile scripts turned into films] or someone like Thompson and his “The Killer Inside Me”.

 

And just to be entirely revolutionary, it might be time to see a female hostess with serious noir chops, for the next Serie Noire TCM installment, instead of the all-male contingent who run foundations and continually host such discussions, and all seem to resemble the bland John Forbes character in the “Pitfall” film. This way there would be a tangible noir milieu for both sects to languorously dwell in and enjoy on TCM, for both the beginning casual fan and the more devout follower.

 

Speaking of wine, for some TCM viewers,  Film Noir Brut is more appealing than Film Noir Demi-Sec.

 

Thanks, TCM for giving an outlet here for both types of thought from the cable subscribers to your network.

 

Often more knowledgeable host just are not very good on camera.   I have found something similar to jazz guitar teachers.     I took lessons from someone that was a total and complete pro,  but he wasn't a good communicator.    The guy with the lessor chops was a lot better communicator and therefor teacher.

 

In addition,  I assume TCM targeted audience is  "neophyte noir fans".    E.g. people fairly 'new' to studio-era films.

 

PS:  Thanks for the tip on Slightly Scarlet.    I wasn't aware of this film since the noir book I use as my primary reference (Film Noir Ward \ Silver), only list the 3 Payne noir films.    Hopefully TMC shows this film (it is from RKO so at least it has a chance verses a Universal or Fox noir).

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If you like your lager lite, instead of a deep, richly layered brew like Guinness, then you might prefer your noir lite too, and Eddie Muller as host would be just your cup of tea, albeit in a watered-down version with a lot of milk.

 

Ergo, Mr. Muller was an excellent choice for hosting duties for neophyte noir fans and he seems to have fully absorbed the concept of “An expert is someone who knows how to be wrong with a lot of authority” as his guest on one of Muller’s TCM Wine Club segments was extolling to him in praise of such limited standards of knowledge and expertise.

 

But for the dedicated and more intense noir aficionado, a host with a more expansive knowledge of film, the sensibilities of a Frank or more seasoned scholars of literature and cinema and a less banal perception of the underpinnings of the genre beyond the superficial dark dames mode, would be admirable in the future. May I suggest that next time TCM begins a noir weekly series that they hire an alternative host with second opinion status as to what constitutes the entire noir spectrum to give viewers a counterpoint to the simplistic Noir Lite mode.

 

It might also be refreshing to see antecedents discussed as in the literature preceding the film history of tales like Renoir's “La Chienne” by author Fouchardiere or the Zola based “La Bete Humaine” or even less discussed “poets of the wet streets and turgid tabloids” with the work of Kersh, Hamilton, Genet, West, Huysman, Conrad and Gide [whose “The Counterfeiters” predates later facsimile scripts turned into films] or someone like Thompson and his “The Killer Inside Me”.

 

And just to be entirely revolutionary, it might be time to see a female hostess with serious noir chops, for the next Serie Noire TCM installment, instead of the all-male contingent who run foundations and continually host such discussions, and all seem to resemble the bland John Forbes character in the “Pitfall” film. This way there would be a tangible noir milieu for both sects to languorously dwell in and enjoy on TCM, for both the beginning casual fan and the more devout follower.

 

Speaking of wine, for some TCM viewers,  Film Noir Brut is more appealing than Film Noir Demi-Sec.

 

Thanks, TCM for giving an outlet here for both types of thought from the cable subscribers to your network.

..or a host who talks out of the side of his mouth and wears black shirts with white ties.

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..or a host who talks out of the side of his mouth and wears black shirts with white ties.

In Ireland they drink "Guinness" with just about everything

 

I'm a rarity in my area, most drink bud, miller,etc-(i.e. water) but most don't care for it because it's sooo thick, like syrup.  I LOVE IT BIG-TIME!

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Instead of calling Muller the czar of noir somebody here once called him the pretender to the throne I think.

 

When TCM had the Summer of Darkness Muller would exchange post with users at this forum.    One person really ripped into him and I felt Muller handled it very well and with humor.

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When TCM had the Summer of Darkness Muller would exchange post with users at this forum.    One person really ripped into him and I felt Muller handled it very well and with humor.

As far as I know, Muller is the only person associated with TCM who has deigned to mix it up with posters on these boards. He deserves credit for that.

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As far as I know, Muller is the only person associated with TCM who has deigned to mix it up with posters on these boards. He deserves credit for that.

I think Muller got upset with the lady who loved Columbo. She didn't like the fact he used old female movie stars to promote himself and his agenda at events. 

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I think Muller got upset with the lady who loved Columbo. She didn't like the fact he used old female movie stars to promote himself and his agenda at events. 

Not being a fan of elder abuse I can agree. As to your earlier question in the other thread Rip, my flatmate used to say that non-diegetic sound accompanying action in noirish films can be instrumental in symbolizing the protagonist's disconnect from the world. Roger Caillois named such a sense "Une sorte de panique voluptuese". The vertiginous fall so common and de rigueur in noirs is where crime and lust meet and flail about helplessly. Such "love" is dangerous since you "fall" into its clutches and hence are trapped. Amidst all the tomes about noir written by countless American males, the ones that really need be written would be the one to examine and expose said authors' soft underbellies, and ask what fuels their addiction. Delving into the viscera of the attraction to cold-hearted seductresses might be tantamount to asking if a boring life or marriage is the catalyst. A symbiotic transference seems to take place that appeases their reality based malaise and makes them dream too much about the dark streets and relentless women that they desire before the fall. It is good that such authors have avocations to work noir festivals and be on tv though to make a buck, since their writing skills don't even equal the lowest of pulp writers of the past who gave the world noir but never profited by their gift.

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Not being a fan of elder abuse I can agree. As to your earlier question in the other thread Rip, my flatmate used to say that non-diegetic sound accompanying action in noirish films can be instrumental in symbolizing the protagonist's disconnect from the world. Roger Caillois named such a sense "Une sorte de panique voluptuese". The vertiginous fall so common and de rigueur in noirs is where crime and lust meet and flail about helplessly. Such "love" is dangerous since you "fall" into its clutches and hence are trapped. Amidst all the tomes about noir written by countless American males, the ones that really need be written would be the one to examine and expose said authors' soft underbellies, and ask what fuels their addiction. Delving into the viscera of the attraction to cold-hearted seductresses might be tantamount to asking if a boring life or marriage is the catalyst. A symbiotic transference seems to take place that appeases their reality based malaise and makes them dream too much about the dark streets and relentless women that they desire before the fall. It is good that such authors have avocations to work noir festivals and be on tv though to make a buck, since their writing skills don't even equal the lowest of pulp writers of the past who gave the world noir but never profited by their gift.

 

Uh,  booze was the primary driver for many a noir writer.

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But please make it a bourbon and not wine.    ;)

I was at a writer's bachelor party once and they wanted to serve him something like a flaming B-52 but the bartender put it in a low, shallow bowl and one half of his face got burnt, plus his hair was all singed and he had to get a haircut the morning of the wedding and wear make-up on the red side. They got divorced later. His bride blamed me for not taking better care of him but he said it gave him good fodder for a story so he didn't care. Bourbon also can cause divorces.

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I was at a writer's bachelor party once and they wanted to serve him something like a flaming B-52 but the bartender put it in a low, shallow bowl and one half of his face got burnt, plus his hair was all singed and he had to get a haircut the morning of the wedding and wear make-up on the red side. They got divorced later. His bride blamed me for not taking better care of him but he said it gave him good fodder for a story so he didn't care. Bourbon also can cause divorces.

 

Well, ya know Gordon, this was REALLY the reason Nick the bartender gave Clarence the angel that dirty look when he at first suggested an order of a Flaming Rum Punch that one Christmas Eve in Bedford Falls.

 

It was really the whole liability factor Nick might have faced if something like that also might have happened there too, ya see.

 

(...and although Nick was also never a fan of Mulled Wine either, and as you may recall)

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Well, ya know Gordon, this as REALLY the reason Nick the bartender gave Clarence the angel that dirty look when he at first suggested an order of a Flaming Rum Punch that one Christmas Eve in Bedford Falls.

 

It was really the whole liability factor Nick might have faced if something like that also might have happened there too, ya see.

 

(...and although Nick was also never a fan of Mulled Wine either, and as you may recall)

His lawyer, Mr. Potter's brother, warned him about things like this.

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