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Why Robert Osborne's death is a greater loss than we may realize


yanceycravat
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I don't think I'm being hyperbolic here when I say that Robert Osborne's death is a greater loss than we may realize.

 

At least three men have died in the past 12 months that had a store of film knowledge that will likely never be replicated, Robert Birchard, Richard Schickle and now Robert Osborne.

 

While I never met Mr. Schickle I had several opportunities to converse with the two Bobs over the years. Both were always willing to answer hard questions regarding film history and even get into the minutiae of different studios. They obviously knew things that, with their passing, are now lost to history. Most likely information that might not deserve special mention in one of their books but still interesting to those of us who never tire of hearing some obscure fact about a film or the personnel who worked on it.

 

When I heard RO speaking with Sirius XM's Greg Bell today, on a rebroadcast of a 2014 interview, it hit me that I can never again follow up with him on something he said. Then it made me think of Bob Birchard and then finally Richard Schickle. While their books live on questions still remain that may never be answered, observations which will never be considered.

 

Someday science may finally be able to "download" our memories on to something that can be stored for future generations. Until then every time we lose someone like Robert Osborne so much more is lost than just a very special person. Knowledge, history and an understanding of the context in which they are placed.

 

All this week I've been mourning Robert's passing. Today I felt it all over again in a different, deeper way.

 

Yancey

 

 

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It's possible that RO has passed many of his stories on to someone or someones, and we just don't know it yet. I agree, though, that there is a huge amount of film knowledge that will likely never surface.

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Anybody can dig up most of the information that Bob knew, but with him it was more than that.  It was his anecdotal style of giving that information that was engaging, rather than just reciting facts, he made it sound like he was storytelling.  Which in HIS case, he probably was.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I feel the same way when anyone from the Hollywood Golden era passes. That's why whenever I think of someone (Glynis Johns, for example, or Olivia de Havilland) that is still alive, I wonder if a reporter or writer is trying to contact them for an interview they may be willing to give. There are undoubtedly nuggets yet to be told that will be gone forever once that person goes.

 

Robert Osborne did participate with so many from the studio era who were still around, from the '60s on, and, yes, the loss of his great encyclopedic knowledge of film is to be mourned, as well as the man himself, by his many fans.

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When I heard RO speaking with Sirius XM's Greg Bell today, on a rebroadcast of a 2014 interview, it hit me that I can never again follow up with him on something he said. Then it made me think of Bob Birchard and then finally Richard Schickle. While their books live on questions still remain that may never be answered, observations which will never be considered.

 

I HEARD THAT TOO, it was SUCH  a good interview.

Robert knew a pretty darn good bit about radio, especially THE LUX THEATER.

It would be nice to see Greg Bell get a night or monthly gig on TCM. He's very charismatic and knows his stuff too.

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I don't think I'm being hyperbolic here when I say that Robert Osborne's death is a greater loss than we may realize.

 

At least three men have died in the past 12 months that had a store of film knowledge that will likely never be replicated, Robert Birchard, Richard Schickle and now Robert Osborne.

 

While I never met Mr. Schickle I had several opportunities to converse with the two Bobs over the years. Both were always willing to answer hard questions regarding film history and even get into the minutiae of different studios. They obviously knew things that, with their passing, are now lost to history. Most likely information that might not deserve special mention in one of their books but still interesting to those of us who never tire of hearing some obscure fact about a film or the personnel who worked on it.

 

When I heard RO speaking with Sirius XM's Greg Bell today, on a rebroadcast of a 2014 interview, it hit me that I can never again follow up with him on something he said. Then it made me think of Bob Birchard and then finally Richard Schickle. While their books live on questions still remain that may never be answered, observations which will never be considered.

 

Someday science may finally be able to "download" our memories on to something that can be stored for future generations. Until then every time we lose someone like Robert Osborne so much more is lost than just a very special person. Knowledge, history and an understanding of the context in which they are placed.

 

All this week I've been mourning Robert's passing. Today I felt it all over again in a different, deeper way.

 

Yancey

Isn't it "Schickel"?

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Re folks like Johns and deHavilland, the right questions need to be asked. What new inquiries can be asked about GWTW? Kirk Douglas...what can you ask him that has never been asked re his movies or his relationships with movers and shakers of Hollywood? 

 

Eddie Mueller would have to be the new RO re noir films, maybe Alec Baldwin can bring insight? 

 

We still have Jane Powell, Margaret O'Brian, Dean Stockwell, Anthony Hopkins can still answer with regards to folks like Peter O'Toole, Kate Hepburn. There is still a lot to be mined from those who lived the show biz life.  Angela Lansbury, too. 

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Re folks like Johns and deHavilland, the right questions need to be asked. What new inquiries can be asked about GWTW? Kirk Douglas...what can you ask him that has never been asked re his movies or his relationships with movers and shakers of Hollywood? 

 

Eddie Mueller would have to be the new RO re noir films, maybe Alec Baldwin can bring insight? 

 

We still have Jane Powell, Margaret O'Brian, Dean Stockwell, Anthony Hopkins can still answer with regards to folks like Peter O'Toole, Kate Hepburn. There is still a lot to be mined from those who lived the show biz life.  Angela Lansbury, too. 

 

Using that recent example of that notorious Jerry Lewis interview juxtaposed with the other recent interview (I forget who posted that but, thanks). But, approach a person the right way. And all those great memories will come pouring out of them. Many would love to tell those stories but, think no body wants to hear them. 

 

I was delighted to hear Doris Day finally came out of hiding. Someone used the dirty trick of offering to donate to an animal charity. She could never refuse that .

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