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Sun Records


Sepiatone
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Anybody else here watching this?

 

It does take liberties with some facts and chronology, but is "spot on" in it's time period looks.

 

Anybody with an interest in the roots of rock'n'roll should be looking at this show as Sam Phillips WAS instrumental(no pun intent) in the promotion and advancement of this long lasting and internationally influencing genre of what, along with jazz, is a "true American art form".

 

 

Sepiatone

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Anybody else here watching this?

 

It does take liberties with some facts and chronology, but is "spot on" in it's time period looks.

 

Anybody with an interest in the roots of rock'n'roll should be looking at this show as Sam Phillips WAS instrumental(no pun intent) in the promotion and advancement of this long lasting and internationally influencing genre of what, along with jazz, is a "true American art form".

 

 

Sepiatone

I'd like to, but you failed to mention where it can be seen. Sam Phillips could be called the Father of Rockabilly.

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As a kid I was very lucky to get a handful of Yellow Sun Records off my father's jukebox.

 

I got Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. These records help to form my knowledge of rock and roll music. Also the Johnny Cash record gave me in roads to loving classic country & western music.

 

Nearly Ten Years Later, John Sebastian wrote this terrific song called Nashville Cats, for his Lovin' Spoonful to honour Sam Phillips and the Yellow Sun artists.

 

All this had a tremendous impact on Ricky Nelson and I believe he was able to actually go down and record with them before he died.

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I'd like to, but you failed to mention where it can be seen. Sam Phillips could be called the Father of Rockabilly.

 

I saw a Sam Phillips 2- 3 hour documentary on the PBS 4-5 years ago.

 

Now I can recall that it seems like they had Paul McCartney recording down there with Elvis' back up musicians.

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I'd like to, but you failed to mention where it can be seen. Sam Phillips could be called the Father of Rockabilly.

 

OW!  Yeah, sorry.  It can be seen on the CMT channel Thurday nights at 10:00 pm.  They have the previous week's episodes on Wednesday nights, same time.

 

 

Like Princess, I was treated to some Sun recordings when young, but by my STEPSISTER, not my Dad.  CARL PERKINS mostly.

 

Sam Phillips didn't limit himelf to rockabilly.  He brought other musical elements into his studio and each artist from differing styles heard all the others and brought what they liked about them into what THEY were doing, and that mixture was the recipe for what became what was called "rock'n'roll".  He recorded "Rocket 88"  and sold it to Leonard Chess.  And according to the show(and history) it WASN'T Ike Turner singing on it.  In fact, the CHESS release credits it to JACKIE BRENSTON and his DELTA CATS.  Brenston was Ike's saxophone player, and Phillips felt HE had the better voice and isisted Brenston sing the vocal.  Ike was the piano player on the disc.

 

And according to the show, Ike Turner stole a TIP JAR from a "colored" diner to get the money to pay for the session.  Don't know how true THAT is, but it's an interesting angle.

 

So far, the show seems to try cramming too much info and background of too many artists all at once.  Following a high school age Elvis with a bit about Phillips starting the studio, marital and personal problems, the affair with his business partner, Colonel Tom Parker's time with Eddy Arnold and Hank Snow and dodging a loan shark, to Johnny Cash in the Air Force in Germany and an adolescent JERRY LEE LEWIS and cousin JIMMY SWAGGART.  A poor casting choice for B.B. King.  And CMT has WAY too many commercials slowing things down if ya ask me.

 

 

Sepiatone

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OW!  Yeah, sorry.  It can be seen on the CMT channel Thurday nights at 10:00 pm.  They have the previous week's episodes on Wednesday nights, same time.

 

 

Like Princess, I was treated to some Sun recordings when young, but by my STEPSISTER, not my Dad.  CARL PERKINS mostly.

 

Sam Phillips didn't limit himelf to rockabilly.  He brought other musical elements into his studio and each artist from differing styles heard all the others and brought what they liked about them into what THEY were doing, and that mixture was the recipe for what became what was called "rock'n'roll".  He recorded "Rocket 88"  and sold it to Leonard Chess.  And according to the show(and history) it WASN'T Ike Turner singing on it.  In fact, the CHESS release credits it to JACKIE BRENSTON and his DELTA CATS.  Brenston was Ike's saxophone player, and Phillips felt HE had the better voice and isisted Brenston sing the vocal.  Ike was the piano player on the disc.

 

And according to the show, Ike Turner stole a TIP JAR from a "colored" diner to get the money to pay for the session.  Don't know how true THAT is, but it's an interesting angle.

 

So far, the show seems to try cramming too much info and background of too many artists all at once.  Following a high school age Elvis with a bit about Phillips starting the studio, marital and personal problems, the affair with his business partner, Colonel Tom Parker's time with Eddy Arnold and Hank Snow and dodging a loan shark, to Johnny Cash in the Air Force in Germany and an adolescent JERRY LEE LEWIS and cousin JIMMY SWAGGART.  A poor casting choice for B.B. King.  And CMT has WAY too many commercials slowing things down if ya ask me.

 

 

Sepiatone

Carl Perkins was the man. Your post reminded me of him, and I was listening to his stuff yesterday. The Beatles loved him, and they covered several of his songs , including "Matchbox" and "Honey Don't".

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Carl Perkins was the man. Your post reminded me of him, and I was listening to his stuff yesterday. The Beatles loved him, and they covered several of his songs , including "Matchbox" and "Honey Don't".

Sun Studios is a great place to visit. Thumbs down on that show tho.

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Carl Perkins was the man. Your post reminded me of him, and I was listening to his stuff yesterday. The Beatles loved him, and they covered several of his songs , including "Matchbox" and "Honey Don't".

 

Interestingly enough, "Matchbox" was the "B" side of "Your True Love", but over the years became better liked and remembered.

 

Even though the Sun label designates Carl as the writer, the tune is actually snatched from lyrics in MA RAINEY'S "Lost Wanderin' Blues" and BLIND LEMON JEFFERSON'S "Matchbox Blues".   Both from the 1920's.

 

Carl's brothers and JERRY LEE LEWIS are also on the recording.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Interestingly enough, "Matchbox" was the "B" side of "Your True Love", but over the years became better liked and remembered.

 

Even though the Sun label designates Carl as the writer, the tune is actually snatched from lyrics in MA RAINEY'S "Lost Wanderin' Blues" and BLIND LEMON JEFFERSON'S "Matchbox Blues".   Both from the 1920's.

 

Carl's brothers and JERRY LEE LEWIS are also on the recording.

 

 

Sepiatone

...and "Honey Don't" was the B side of "Blue Suede Shoes".

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...and "Honey Don't" was the B side of "Blue Suede Shoes".

 

Yep indeedee.  But the difference is that BSB was the "hit"  with "Honey Don't" sorta riding in on it's coattails.  But BOTH became rockabilly classics, with "Honey Don't" actually being "covered" more than BSB.

 

Sort of a "I Wanna Hold Your Hand"/"I Saw Her Standing There"  thing with the Beatles.  With ISHST on the "B" side.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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Brian Setzer, who led The Stray Cats, may be the last great proponent of this rockabilly genre.

Yes- he (and they) brought some renewed interest in that genre in the early 1980's. He still tours, mainly during holiday seasons, with his hybrid swing/rockabilly big band. They are pretty awesome, too. :)

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Yes- he (and they) brought some renewed interest in that genre in the early 1980's. He still tours, mainly during holiday seasons, with his hybrid swing/rockabilly big band. They are pretty awesome, too. :)

There are other good relatively obscure rockabilly acts that are known among the, yes, intelligentsia, but the Stray Cats are the only one that achieved a wide audience.

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Yes- he (and they) brought some renewed interest in that genre in the early 1980's. He still tours, mainly during holiday seasons, with his hybrid swing/rockabilly big band. They are pretty awesome, too. :)

 

"Rockabilly", "Swing", they both came from the same place and so work well together.  And Setzer is a MASTER of both.  So you can't expect any disappointment in his results.  :)

 

Sepiatone

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"Rockabilly", "Swing", they both came from the same place and so work well together.  And Setzer is a MASTER of both.  So you can't expect any disappointment in his results.  :)

 

Sepiatone

 

During the stage I was making the transition in my own playing from Rock to Jazz,   I really got into Setzer and his style of playing.   I found his music to be a great bridge between Rock and more 'pure' swing style music  (e.g. Ellington songs).    Saw him live in many very nice fairly intimate settings.     He really helped me development since 25 years ago I couldn't play like a true jazz cat,  but was bored with playing the same old rock progressions.      Yes, a master of his craft. 

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My personal guage of "swing" quality was my Mother, who "came of age" in the "swing" era and LOVED the cassette tape I made for her of Setzer's "Dirty Boogie".   She at first thought such a band wouldn't work fronted by a guitar player, but was surprised at how well he made it work.  She also likened his voice to that of BOBBY DARIN, who she also liked.  She told me she'd put the tape on when she cleaned house and would dance around getting the place "s p i  c and span".  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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