Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Which Is The First Movie That You Ever Watched?


Palmerin
 Share

Recommended Posts

As far as I can remember mine was THE GAMMA PEOPLE of 1956, with Paul Douglas, Walter Rilla, and Eva Bartok. I was born on 18 September 1954, and it's the earliest movie I remember from the late 50s horror and sci fi show LA PREMIERE DEL MAS ALLA=THE PREMIERE FROM THE BEYOND. It played on Sunday evenings, so it was a great way to start the work week.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am sorry to say that it is impossible for me to know that. My uncle cared for me while my mother worked. He put a highchair next to his projector as he showed movies. I was less than a year old. It is known that I watched the movies because I would be quiet while a movie played. It became a family joke that I could read a foreign language before I could speak because I would begin to fuss the moment "Fin" appeared on the screen as if I knew it meant the movie was done.

 

I know that I must have watched: Tretya meshchanskaya (1927) when very young because a family story is that I wanted a thing at the market it because it was like the one: "the pretty lady has." No person knew what I meant until my uncle recognized it as being in that movie. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first two movies I remember seeing in a theater are "Dr. Doolittle" (1967) (I remember I loved the song "Talk to the Animals" and that's about it.) and "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" (1968)--the one about the flying car that has a duet sung in a dungeon (Choo Chi Face? Chu Chi Face--I forget the spelling).  Perfect selections for a three year old, LOL (I was born in 1964).

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First in a theater was a reissue of Lady and the Tramp. My mother was pregnant with my sister and apparently thought I was a Cocker spaniel (if a different gender than Lady) who needed an education first. Like many dogs, I had to go potty a lot during the show. I distinctly remember returning with one parent back down the darken aisle with the canine looking inside the crib on a huge screen to the sound of "La la lou".

 

My first "new" movie (roughly two years later) was Herbie Rides Again and I was greatly disappointed that our 1965 Chrysler didn't behave like that.

 

Saw the first Johnny Weissmuller Tarzan in a library movie showing and King King on TV by the time I was five or six and became obsessed with black and white jungles full of midget cannibals for a while. (Valley of the Dinosaurs and Land of the Lost were timed conveniently shortly after Kong to make me a dino-fanatic as well.) In elementary, middle and high school, 16mm movies were shown constantly before the arrival of VHS. You name it, we saw it... from Frank Baxter Bell Science documentaries a.k.a. Hemo The Magnificent to deadly boring Coronet Films up through 16mm versions of Jason and the Argonauts and Raiders of the Lost Ark.

 

Like so many of Generation X, I was introduced to silent cinema through episodes of Sesame Street:

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps a better title for this thread would be "What Is The First Movie You Remember Watching?".  :)

     The first movie I recollect seeing in the theater was STAR WARS (1977) when I was 4.  I always remembered the scene where Luke Skywalker returned to his home to find smoke billowing out of the house and the cooked bodies of his aunt and uncle. 

 

     The earliest made-for-television movie I recall watching circa 1983 when I was 10 or so . . . well, actually there were 2 of them I saw about the same time.  Can't remember which one I saw first on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, but the two tele-films were JARRETT (1973) with Glenn Ford hot on the trail of Biblical scrolls and CRIME CLUB (1973) with Lloyd Bridges and Victor Buono. 

 

     Glenn Ford was an insurance investigator after some stolen Biblical scrolls and runs up against urbane villain Anthony Quayle and his gang of campy henchman.  This TVM has never been released on any homevideo format, but I managed to find a copy someone taped from television many moons ago.  My nostalgic 'fix' was satiated.  And the copy is quite watchable.  I've not run across a copy of CRIME CLUB, but there's probably a copy of it out there somewhere . . .     

 

     I think JARRETT and CRIME CLUB were busted pilots. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw The Wizard of Oz and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in September and May of 1976 respectively.  I saw The Shaggy Dog in September 1975, I think.  I saw Robin Hood, the Disney animated movie when it reached my small town.  It was released in November 1973 so it may have taken a year or two for it get to my town.  But it's possible that I saw Hansel and Gretel, a 1954 puppet movie before then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apparently when I was 3 in 1987, my parents tried taking me to The Aristocats, but I wasn't having it and ended up having to leave the movie. 

 

The first movie that I remember seeing is The Little Mermaid in 1989 when I was 5. 

 

My parents had Showtime in the 80s and used to record a lot of movies on VHS.  It's likely that I saw other 80s movies, but I don't have direct memories of watching them.  The only one that I can kind of remember watching a lot is Summer Rental.  I didn't see it when it was new (it came out in 1985 when I was 1), but I know that I saw it as a preschool/kindergartner (1987-1989).  Even now, my family and I still watch it.  We can recite many of the lines with the movie. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 2nd movie I remember seeing in a theater was the 1979 comedy THE VILLAIN with Kirk Douglas at the Cinema 70 theater in the Palm Coast Plaza.  In West Palm Beach, FL.  Or maybe the 'Palm Coast Plaza was actually in Lake Worth . . . shucks!  Who remembers?  :P    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're asking me to hark back more than 60 years!

 

I'm almost pretty sure it was some Johnny Weismuller TARZAN flick on TV, as the neighboring Winsor, Ont. station showed them twice a weeknight.

 

First at the THEATER?  Hard to say.   I think maybe it was a "re-issue" of Disney's ALICE IN WONDERLAND at the Park Theater here in my hometown.  That would have been maybe 1955 when I was FOUR.  I can't be sure since it WAS so long ago.....

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recall discussing with my grandparents about their childhood movies when they were still alive. (The last one, who was not the oldest, passed away at age 94 a decade ago.)

 

One saw Pearl White serials. A much younger one had nightmares after seeing Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera at age six or seven when it first came out and wouldn't return to the flickers for several months. Those who were born in the teens remember how much a big deal talkies were in the late twenties and all of local theaters getting temporarily shut down in order to get re-wired. Also everybody went to see The Birth of a Nation in 1915 (even if those familiar with it were still too young to attend), Ben Hur in 1926, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1938 and Gone With the Wind in 1940 since they were the great "event" movies everybody HAD to see. Even though ticket prices were much cheaper then, not everybody could afford to go as often as we all think they could. Of course, you only had radio back then, no TV, competing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first theatre movie I remember being at? I don't know the name, but I was two and was with my grandmother and mother and apparently was so bored I began crying loudly. They had to leave the theatre with me. I remember the episode, but not the movie. This would have been 1960.

 

The first movie I remember seeing by name? I was  eight in 1966 and on the weekends KTVT in Dallas showed horror movies. The film I remember seeing was "Invasion of the Body Snatchers". That thing scared the s**t out of me. I couldn't sleep and wondered when my dad came home from work if he was real dad or "pod dad". Of course I kept this to myself or else no more horror movies for me.

 

I also remember seeing "Macabre" at about the same time, it didn't scare me that much but it left an impression. Jim Backus, the millionaire on Gilligan's Island, as tragic romantic figure? A dead blind woman with her daughter possibly in her arms in her coffin at the mortuary? Wild stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe it was House on Haunted Hill. My father was a nut on scary movies and I remember clinging to him while watching this film.

Great ending: Elisha Cook speaking to the audience= SOON THEY--the ghosts--WILL BE COMING FOR ME, AND THEN THEY WILL BE COMING FOR YOU!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first two movies I remember seeing in a theater are "Dr. Doolittle" (1967) (I remember I loved the song "Talk to the Animals" and that's about it.) and "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" (1968)--the one about the flying car that has a duet sung in a dungeon (Choo Chi Face? Chu Chi Face--I forget the spelling).  Perfect selections for a three year old, LOL (I was born in 1964).

 

Come to think of it, since you're exactly as much of a geezer as I am, Dr. Doolittle--and had to go to the big city to see that--IS as far back as I remember.  Wow, was that one front-loaded with studio hype...And at least I remembered the two-headed llama and the pink snail, but that's probably because I had the tie-in book as a kid.

1967 would predate '68's Chitty and Yellow Submarine, along with various Ron Miller-era Disney comedies and revivals that I always put as "first".  (How far back did Fantasia show in 60's/70's revivals?)

 

When I was first doing a series of blog posts on great theaters of my childhood, I discovered I could remember almost every movie I ever saw at my hometown theater between '73-'76 (and a few at the Geneva, NY theater before it was restored back into the historic Smith Opera House), but I couldn't remember what was the FIRST one.

Before our own historic hometown opera-house/cinema burned down in 1972 (and the small cinderblock plex-room theater built in its place, that I did remember), I remember Disney's "The Boatniks" from 1970, but since I also remember falling asleep at 2001, that would predate it a year or two before--Right around the time of Chitty and Submarine.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In theater it may have been On the Waterfront; an odd choice for a 7 yr. old. Until I saw it again years later, my recollections were Brando's checkered jacket, his bloody fist after breaking the window to get Edie and himself out of the way of the speeding truck, and the fight with Lee J. Cobb at the end. When I later read that they used chocolate syrup for blood for black and white movies, I wondered if it was U-Bet, Bosco or Hershey's. I've seen Waterfront dozens of times and it remains one of my all time top ten favorites.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

 

One of my very first recollections as a kid was sitting in the first row at The Egyptian Theater in Hollywood, and when my parents took me to see DeMille's epic Technicolor remake in late 1956. I was not quite 5 y/o at the time.

 

The part of the film I most vividly remember was when Chuck Heston as Moses(before he finds out he's really a Hebrew) saves his birth mother Yochabel's (Martha Scott) life when her tunic gets caught between two enormous stone blocks while she's greasing the skids(literally) as they're being moved together...

 

TenCommand_004Pyxurz.jpg

 

(...my mother loved that movie to the she died...my adopted mother, that is...and which now reminds me to ask my birth mother up in British Columbia what she's thought of this flick the next time I talk to her) 

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple I remember seeing but I'm not sure which came first. It's probably Darby O'Gill and the Little People with my brother and our cousin when I was about 5. I was terrified but then again most films produced by Walt himself had an element of terror in them. Another one that made an impact was Battleground that my family saw at the drive in the same year. It was probably a re-release in 1959 because I wasn't alive during the initial release in 1949. It's still my favorite war film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first ones I can name are some Disney films like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (seen on a 16mm film projector in school on "movie day" in grade school).  These were either rentals or maybe they even got them from the library.  I remember the brown cardboard shipping boxes.  I think I paid more attention to darkened lunch room, all the other people around me, and the projector and badly distorting extension speakers than the actual movie.  In my earlier years I was really a book and TV guy.  I always had a story book in my hands as a kid.  Saw some things on TV but didn't go to an actual theater until I was older.  So this had to be my first movie-going experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first classic movie I remember being introduced to was:  "The Philadelphia Story." It was playing on a local channel on a Saturday afternoon and my mother told me to "Come in and watch this movie. It's a really great one and I think you'll like it." No apologies for a black and white movie, no apologies for it being an "old movie," just a welcoming invite by my mother to sample one of best movies ever made with its witty script and its amazing cast.  I was probably 7 or 8 at the time and it was the beginning of my mother giving me an awareness of the best (in her opinion!) of the classic films and the actors and directors who made them.  My parents also loved current movies (we were always going to the movies with them) but even though the studio system films were pretty much over by the time they were young adults who were having kids, they still appreciated those films and passed that appreciation on to me.  When it came time to write my master's thesis in theatre, inspired by that first classic movie my mother had introduced me to so long ago, I chose as my topic, a discussion of the plays of Philip Barry, who authored, of course, "The Philadelphia Story."

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first ones I can name are some Disney films like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang...

 

 

...AHHH!!!   :angry:

Oh, if there's one movie urban-legend we'd like to bury, it's "Disney's CCBB"...If not simply because that was the producer's criminal intention.

 

(It in fact was a United Artists release owned by Albert Broccoli, who owned the rights to all of Ian Fleming's other books along with the 007 series, but decided not to let EON productions produce this one.

And, since Mary Poppins was still coin of the realm for G-rated kiddie musicals three years later, Broccoli creatively went out and grabbed Dick Van Dyke, the Sherman Bros., chimney-sweep choreographers Marc Breaux/DeeDee Wood, and Sally Anne Howes, who Van Dyke said may have had an even better voice than Julie Andrews.)

 

filmlover293 

--the one about the flying car that has a duet sung in a dungeon (Choo Chi Face? Chu Chi Face--I forget the spelling).  

 

"Chu" is correct. 

And although most of us knew that that was Auric Goldfinger as the Baron (told ya it was a Broccoli-007 movie...), it wasn't until the last few viewings that I caught on that that was Anna "You're him, aren't you?" Quayle in the Mel-Brooks-Producers outfits as the Baroness, and start watching her comic bits in the movie.

(Watch her unimpressed reaction after Van Dyke does his puppet imitation.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the first classic film I saw was The Wizard of Oz, and a few of the Disney movies, like Snow White and Bambi. Then I saw a lot of the old horror movies on TV, like DraculaFrankensteinThe Wolf Man and The Mummy. And the many westerns and war movies that showed up on TV. Later I got into noirs and other crime pictures. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

...AHHH!!!   :angry:

Oh, if there's one movie urban-legend we'd like to bury, it's "Disney's CCBB"...If not simply because that was the producer's criminal intention.

 

(It in fact was a UA release owned by Albert Broccoli, who owned the rights to all of Ian Fleming's other books along with the 007 series, but decided not to let EON productions produce this one.

And, since Mary Poppins was still coin of the realm for G-rated kiddie musicals three years later, Broccoli creatively went out and grabbed Dick Van Dyke, the Sherman Bros., chimney-sweep choreographers Marc Breaux/DeeDee Wood, and Sally Anne Howes, who Van Dyke said may have had an even better voice than Julie Andrews.)

 

LOL  Not sure how that makes it an urban legend, unless there are a significant amount of others out there who had a similar experience as I did.  I haven't seen it since I was a kid, and it was always shown along with actual Disney movies.  Again, I didn't find them to be that memorable at that time.  It was more the movie going experience for me at the time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...