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colorized: the murdered artform


NipkowDisc
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colorized prints of Chain Lightning and Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House were syndicated nationally a decade ago, am I the only one registered here who ever saw them?...

 

if so then the dismissal of colorization is premature and biased. :)

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colorized prints of Chain Lightning and Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House were syndicated nationally a decade ago, am I the only one registered here who ever saw them?...

 

if so then the dismissal of colorization is premature and biased. :)

 

I'm pretty sure you're the only one who wanted to see them.

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I STILL say that someone should get into the endeavor of decolorizing .   Making movies shot originally in color  into BLACK AND WHITE so they can look BETTER!  :D

 

Imagine movies like

 

BONNIE AND CLYDE

 

THE GODFATHER

 

SAVING PRIVATE RYAN

 

HOFFA

 

TOMBSTONE

 

All in glorious  BLACK AND WHITE!  :wub:

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm pretty sure you're the only one who wanted to see them.

my point is colorization does work. just because most tcm posters here reject it does not nullify my argument.

 

I give up!

 

it IS pointless preaching to the dismissive...

 

but I know I'm right. :)

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my point is colorization does work. just because most tcm posters here reject it does not nullify my argument.

 

I give up!

 

it IS pointless preaching to the dismissive...

 

but I know I'm right. :)

 

What do you mean by 'work'????   That there is a market for colorized films?      IF YES:

 

You may be right;  that if TCM was to show a colorized version it might attract new viewers to TCM.     But they would also lose viewers like myself who don't wish to see a colorized film.        Hard to know what the end result (as it relates to viewership)  would be.

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And speakin' of "murdered"...

 

Ya know, some of my best work around here often seems to meet this same fate!

 

(...I'm of course referring to our illustrious Moderator who must have deleted my earlier post in this baby showing that box of crayons and a coloring book that I said I was gonna send to ND)

 

LOL

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IF your point is to convince people that your misguided belief that colorizing an original Black&White movie makes it BETTER, then you're WRONG.

 

A good movie is good, not matter what.  Just as a stinker of a movie stinks no matter what.

 

If a movie being in color is MORE important to you than the movie ITSELF, then YOU'RE missing the whole point of ANY movie to begin with.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Yeah, check out some of those colorized Shirley Temple films. She has a darling pinkish hue on her cheeks but her teeth are gray and it gives me the creeps!

 

Way Out West is another example of sloppy colorization. There seems to have been a small attempt at splashing some color on everybody's clothes, but the backgrounds are left in black & white. It looks terrible and I can't watch it.

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What do you mean by 'work'????   That there is a market for colorized films?      IF YES:

 

You may be right;  that if TCM was to show a colorized version it might attract new viewers to TCM.     But they would also lose viewers like myself who don't wish to see a colorized film.        Hard to know what the end result (as it relates to viewership)  would be.

no, I mean that colorizing CAN improve a black & white film.

 

I saw it! with both chain lightning and Mr. Blandings builds His Dream House.

 

think people. when muriel blandings is giving her color scheme to the painter, you doan think it adds something to the overall comedic value to see it in color?

 

a somewhat disappointing lack of intuition here from so many lovers of film. you should listen to guys like me, your space cadet couch potato types who have logged in hundreds of hours in front of the living room TV.

 

we got some of you hoy-faloy types beat because we are natural born experts.

 

you dismiss colorization so cavalierly never really having been open to it.

 

that's unfortunate because I win the argument.

 

only tcm setting aside a single night of showing colorized prints of Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House and Chain Lightning and a negative viewer reaction can defeat me. :D

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IF your point is to convince people that your misguided belief that colorizing an original Black&White movie makes it BETTER, then you're WRONG.

 

A good movie is good, not matter what.  Just as a stinker of a movie stinks no matter what.

 

If a movie being in color is MORE important to you than the movie ITSELF, then YOU'RE missing the whole point of ANY movie to begin with.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Here's an interesting sidenote and a pic I have posted here before.  Much of the detail we perceive is in B&W (the rod cells on the retina).  The color is perceived by the cone cells, which are fewer.  Below is an example of the current YUV video standard which was developed to try and match the way we see, one Luminance channel and two Chroma channels are needed (on an analog video system this requires three different wires just for video, not including audio).

 

Notice how most of the detail is preserved as B&W.  [Note that this is strictly defined B&W, for video transmission purposes, and doesn't account for the additional tones that the B&W film will have.

 

 

YUVexample.png

 

So when you see a B&W movie, you are not missing as much as you might think.

 

On top of that, colorizing cannot possibly create what is not there.  It must rely on the B&W for everything (as well as some human "creative input").  So no picture information will be "added" or "restored".  Picture information will just be manipulated.

 

Now, if there was only something I could do about those widescreen movies that show up on TCM as postage-stamp-sized video in the middle of my HDTV.

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The 1984 Giorgio Moroder restoration of Metropolis did just that.  It seemed to work out well.  Fewer interruptions.

 

I know that's what they called it, but that wasn't a restoration. Cutting out footage and replacing other shots with modern makeovers doesn't count as "restoring", in my book. That was...something else.

 

Title card writing and design was a respected art form in its day, and should be retained for posterity whenever possible. Doing away with them isn't as egregious as colorizing or pan-and-scan, but it's close. 

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Making silent movies talk will be next.

 

Voice actors

 

I know that's what they called it, but that wasn't a restoration. Cutting out footage and replacing other shots with modern makeovers doesn't count as "restoring", in my book. That was...something else.

 

Title card writing and design was a respected art form in its day, and should be retained for posterity whenever possible. Doing away with them isn't as egregious as colorizing or pan-and-scan, but it's close. 

 

Yeah, it has its ups and downs.  That was a restoration before the restoration movement really hit.  But just addressing James's thoughts.  It is a one-of-a-kind thing.  I think of it as more of a fly-over than a restoration by today's standards.

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Voice actors

 

 

Yeah, it has its ups and downs.  That was a restoration before the restoration movement really hit.  But just addressing James's thoughts.  It is a one-of-a-kind thing.  I think of it as more of a fly-over than a restoration by today's standards.

 

I admit I enjoyed it back in the day, in all of its 80's cheese glory. But after seeing the real deal, it lost its appeal outside of the camp quality. I'm happy that Kino issued all versions on disc.

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It would be great if a studio or film restoration firm replaced the cards with the text with subtitles like a foreign film.

 

A film should be restored to it's original date of release quality.  If it had title cards, keep them but if its a foreign, do a translation in English but keep the original design.

 

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

 

This is a blank title card - one can add whatever language.

 

2e5f45bb6cbd66f29fbbef574cbaf062.jpg

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A film should be restored to it's original date of release quality.  If it had title cards, keep them but if its a foreign, do a translation in English but keep the original design.

 

 

 

 

 

This is a blank title card - one can add whatever language.

 

 

 

I don't agree.   A film should be restored in such a way that it enhances the movie watching experience.   Title cards really distract from the viewing experience.    Since technology can get rid of them,  I say throw them into the dustbin of film history. 

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I don't agree.   A film should be restored in such a way that it enhances the movie watching experience.   Title cards really distract from the viewing experience.    Since technology can get rid of them,  I say throw them into the dustbin of film history. 

 

That's just as dumb as Nipkow's colorizing rants. Accept it for what it is, and if you can't, then move on. 

 

Besides, one person's "enhancement" is another's disrespect and bastardization. 

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