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Who has an all-time favourite score & composer???


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Just thought of this because while I'm online at present I have I hart radio on & the utterly beautiful music by the late 5 time Oscar winning composer: Out of Africa" (l985) & it's companion pc from 1980 Somewhere In Time-(outrageously not even nommed) Reckon many of you also use I heart radio & although The chairman of the Board: Francis (Albert) Sinatra is my fav. I saved many others, but by far legendary composers such as Steiner, Williams, Ennio, Herrmann, C. Coppola and Nino Rota for The Godfather of course & more

 

So I pondered what are some of you fellow TCM-ITES own all-time favorite motion picture scores & composers? (TRIVIA: A. Newman still holds Academy Award Record with 9 victories) Sadly given his age at 85 not certain J. Williams will tie let alone break the AMPAS record) & outrageously Morricone finally took home 1 statuette at age 87 for 2015's Hateful-Eight???)

 

 

Anyway, please send your own pix

 

(P.S. in a poll I conducted on the FB companion piece tcm (fanatics) Vertigo & Lawrence of Arabia tied for the winner) & who remembers a post I write a couple yrs back where AFI-(was quiet about it to) had a lg presentation a The Hollywood Bowl & with J. Williams conducting no less in 06 AFI's 100yrs...of Movie Music I printed the top ten on here out of 25 scores)

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Just for fan fun l'll post that 2006 American Film Institute list again-reckon' fans didn't vote, as I could way back on certain thing?)-(the top ten out of 25 winners):

1. Star Wars (l977) (J. Williams)

2 GWTW (l939) (Steiner)

3. Lawrence of Arabia (l962)(M. Jarre)

4. Psycho (l960)(B. Herrmann)

5th place The Godfather (l972)(Carmine Coppola & Nino Rota)

6. Laura (l944)(David Raksin)

7. Jaws (l975) (J. Williams)

8. The Magnificent 7 (l960)(E. Bernstein

9. Chinatown (l974) Goldsmith)

10th High Noon (l952) (Tiomkin)

11th Adventures of Robin Hood (l938)(Korngold)

12th Vertigo (l958) (B. Herrmann) (1958)

 

& my 2 cents are "Once Upon a Time in the west" (l969)

 

(P.S. saw a small shoe on movie music between Spielberg & J. Williams & Steven's favorite scores were:

Pinocchio" & "Vertigo but Williams admires 1954's On the waterfront (L. Bernstein) best)

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Film scores are my favorite music, and have been since seeing BEN-HUR during its original release.  My absolute favorite composer (because I find him so versatile), is Jerry Goldsmith.  As for favorite score, that's just too difficult.  For many years, it was Pino Donnagio's score to Brain De Palma's DRESSED TO KILL.  However, I'm also quite partial to Elmer Bernstein's HAWAII, and Jerome Moross' THE CARDINAL, and James Newton Howard's THE VILLAGE, and Ryuichi Sakamoto's SNAKE EYES, and Ennio Morricone's ORCA, and...

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So many come to mind, but IF I have to pick just one, well, let's just say in the last few years I've twice, and knowing beforehand that TCM was showing THE BIG COUNTRY at a particular time, have tuned into it JUST to watch and listen to that movie's opening credits and its stirring score composed by Jerome Moross.

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I know it's not a popular opinion, but I'm not really a fan of John Williams' scores.  Now, that's not to say that I haven't liked some of them; and, in the case of THE FURY, even loved some of them.  However, he seems to excel at Main Titles; but, his scores as a whole, just don't impress me.  I know he doesn't care what I think.  Meanwhile, I adore all his work from TV's LOST IN SPACE.  It remains my favorite thing he's even done.  Also, his Main Title to SUPERMAN is among the very best, ever written, imo.

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I know it's not a popular opinion, but I'm not really a fan of John Williams' scores.  Now, that's not to say that I haven't liked some of them; and, in the case of THE FURY, even loved some of them.  However, he seems to excel at Main Titles; but, his scores as a whole, just don't impress me.  I know he doesn't care what I think.  Meanwhile, I adore all his work from TV's LOST IN SPACE.  It remains my favorite thing he's even done.  Also, his Main Title to SUPERMAN is among the very best, ever written, imo.

 

I agree, to an extent. Sometimes his scores can be too much, too manipulative. I enjoy most of the stuff he did for the Star Wars films, and the Indiana Jones theme, which is similar to the Superman theme.

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So many come to mind, but IF I have to pick just one, well, let's just say in the last few years I've twice, and knowing beforehand that TCM was showing THE BIG COUNTRY at a particular time, have tuned into it JUST to watch and listen to that movie's opening credits and its stirring score composed by Jerome Moross.

Main Titles (themes) vs. scores are almost two different lists for me.

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A film score needs to be heard while you are watching the film, because it is designed to accompany the film, not to be heard separately by itself.  That is why I rarely buy movie soundtrack CDs or listen to them.  I watch the movie instead.  Music is part of a film's sound design, if you will.  Just as you wouldn't listen to dialog or sound effects without watching the film, you wouldn't listen to its music without watching it.  In the early days of Oscars, they gave out the award for sound to everyone who worked on the film's soundtrack: sound technicians and music composers.

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A film score needs to be heard while you are watching the film, because it is designed to accompany the film, not to be heard separately by itself.  That is why I rarely buy movie soundtrack CDs or listen to them.  I watch the movie instead.  Music is part of a film's sound design, if you will.  Just as you wouldn't listen to dialog or sound effects without watching the film, you wouldn't listen to its music without watching it.  In the early days of Oscars, they gave out the award for sound to everyone who worked on the film's soundtrack: sound technicians and music composers.

Your words do not compute.  I adore film scores.  Why wouldn't I want to listen to music I love????!!!!  I can, somewhat agree, that you might not want to listen to a film's score, prior to seeing the film, but to never listen to it, outside of viewing the film, seems absurd, to me.  Many scores, completely stand on their own.  Even if they don't, they remind you of the scene they accompany in the film, if nothing else.  So do you not listen to the music from, say, CARMEN, because you aren't watching the opera?  Do you not listen to songs from a musical (which are nothing more than continuation of dialog in book musicals), because you aren't watching them?

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A film score needs to be heard while you are watching the film, because it is designed to accompany the film, not to be heard separately by itself.  That is why I rarely buy movie soundtrack CDs or listen to them.  I watch the movie instead.  Music is part of a film's sound design, if you will.  Just as you wouldn't listen to dialog or sound effects without watching the film, you wouldn't listen to its music without watching it.  In the early days of Oscars, they gave out the award for sound to everyone who worked on the film's soundtrack: sound technicians and music composers.

 

Bullscheisse.

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Bullscheisse.

 

Keep in mind that movie soundtrack CDs usually do not even contain what you hear in the actual movies.  How do you guys even judge which score composers you like if you don't really hear their actual works??   Studios usually have separate recording sessions just for the CDs.  These so-called soundtracks don't give you the versions of the scores that *count*, that matter.  I have tried listening to them, and, expectedly, felt only half the impact.

 

But what I DO love are those "isolated music tracks" that you sometimes get on DVDs and Blu-rays.  But those are decidedly not for listening pleasure.  They are for you to study how movie score composition really works.  First of all, these tracks give you the real thing, the actual score you hear in the movie.  And second, they show you how a movie and its score work together.  Good score composition is usually something you don't notice.  That is especially why these isolated tracks are valuable.  A score that seems like a string of nonsensical and random notes suddenly come alive when they are paired with the movie image.  Now, THAT is movie magic, and it should be really the thing that real movie lovers care about.

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I'm not going to directly answer the original question because I don't have any single all-time favorite score or composer. But I do have a number that I really love.

 

If I had a gun to my head, Jerry Goldsmith would probably be the favorite film/tv composer.

And if I had to pick a single score under similar circumstances, it would probably be for Jesus Christ Superstar, even with the screen version being inferior to some of the other recordings imo.

 

 

Some others I really love, just off the top of my head (meaning that if I were to think about this for a few days, there would probably be quite a few others)--and not limited to just the Classic Films period:

 

Bernard Herrmann

Ennio Morricone

Terrence Blanchard

 

 

some individual titles (either the whole score OR individual pieces from it) I really love:

 

Jerry Goldsmith, "A Kaddish for the 6 Million" from QBVII (1974)

 

Jerry Goldsmith, In Like Flint (1967), Our Man Flint (1966)

Jean-Claude Petit, Lumumba (2000)

Angelo Badalamenti, The Comfort of Strangers (1990)

Bernard Herrmann, North By Northwest (1959)

Jerry Goldsmith, The Chairman (1969)

Jerry Goldsmith, The Omen (1976)

Jerry Goldsmith, Capricorn One (1977)

Toto & Brian Eno, Dune (1984)

incidental music from The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Jerry Goldsmith, Basic Instinct (1992)

Bernard Herrmann, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

 

There's a whole other group if we're drawing from films that were originally meant for the stage or from film musicals. I won't go there (excepting the mention above of Jesus Christ Superstar and The Wizard of Oz).

 

 

Not really a fan of John Williams' work. He's wayyy overrated. There are a few pieces that were great works, such as the second theme to tv's Lost in Space and main themes for Dracula and  Jurassic Park, but other than those and a few others, his stuff sounds too formulaic, repetitive, unimaginative. And I don't like how he uses the brass or his percussive patterns (at least in his last few decades).

 

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I may be the only one who liked the electronic/synth scores from the late 70's-early 80's, like those from John Carpenter (Halloween, Escape from New York), Giorgio Moroder (Midnight Express, Cat People), Vangelis (Blade Runner, Chariots of Fire), Tangerine Dream (Thief, The Keep), Goblin (Suspiria, Dawn of the Dead), Harold Faltermeyer (Beverly Hills Cop, Fletch).

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AM.MarvinHamlisch.jpg

 

Marvin Hamlisch (1944-2012) was amazing! He won three music Oscars in one night (April 2, 1974):

  • Best Original Dramatic Score for "The Way We Were"
  • Best Original Song Score or Adaptation Score for "The Sting" 
  • Best Original Song -- "The Way We Were" (shared with lyricists Alan and Marilyn Bergman).

He was one of 12 people to win at least one Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony, and he also earned a Pultizer Prize for "A Chorus Line."

 

In addition, he scored the third Roger Moore 007 film "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) -- and I didn't even miss the great John Barry!

 

 

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I may be the only one who liked the electronic/synth scores from the late 70's-early 80's, like those from John Carpenter (Halloween, Escape from New York), Giorgio Moroder (Midnight Express, Cat People), Vangelis (Blade Runner, Chariots of Fire), Tangerine Dream (Thief, The Keep), Goblin (Suspiria, Dawn of the Dead), Harold Faltermeyer (Beverly Hills Cop, Fletch).

 

You left out WALTER( later WENDY) CARLOS' electronic adaptation of Beethoven for A CLOCKWORK ORANGE.

 

Anyway, I have several "favorite" scores covering the breadth of movie history.

 

The HARBURG/ARLEN/STOTHART score for WIZARD OF OZ

 

 

JOHN WILLIAMS score for THE COWBOYS ('73)

 

CARMINE COPPOLA's score for THE BLACK STALLION and the resurrected ABEL GANCE masterpiece NAPOLEON

 

 

Sepiatone 

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bos-newman-pic01.jpg

 

Another of my favorites is Thomas Newman, who is a member of the famed Newman family of composers. He has been nominated for 14 Oscars without a win.

 

I particularly admire his scores from "American Beauty" (1999), "White Oleander" (2002) and "Road to Perdition" (2002).

 

 

 

I also liked his themes for the television series "Six Feet Under" and "Boston Public."

 

 

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