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RO's Picks Scheduled Tonight Starting at 8:00


catladywdc
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As I suspected, Ben paid tribute to RO in the opening intro to "Eve".  I guess they must have filmed at least new intros for tonight's line-up so Ben could mention RO's passing. The wrap-ups were likley fine as is.

 

I've been suggesting for years that they recycle some of the old intros for the early morning movies. However, while watching RO's very first intro for GWTW, which re-aired during his 48 hour celebration, it occurred to me that those old intros might need to be digitized for the airing in HD. I also realized that the earliest intros were probably taped and not filmed which might possibly mean they'd need some kind of restoration or color correction as well. Which is probably expensive and there must be something like 20,000 intros or more.

 

The thought of any of RO's intros being lost would be rather ironic, don't you think?

 

Yancey

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This idea has been brought up on several different threads since Robert's passing. Personally, I think it's highly unlikely. For one thing, painful as it sounds, I believe the network has to think about looking forward, not back. For another, Robert's presence introducing a movie would just confuse some viewers. I guarantee you someone would start a thread on here asking if Robert was still alive! If they were going to do it, they would have to put some sort of banner on the screen to let viewers know that this was from the past.

 

I suspect we will continue to periodically see some of the Private Screenings and TCM Film Festival interviews Robert did, perhaps in the wee hours of the morning where they now sometimes show the Elvis Mitchell interview with Joan Allen (why only the Joan Allen one? I don't know, but I swear it's the only one they ever show anymore) or in prime time, given appropriate context. For example, if anyone Robert interviewed is a SOTM in the future, TCM might well kick off that month with Robert's interview of that star. 

 

Ben Mankeiwicz has been introducing Bob's Picks for more than a "couple of months", as the last time Robert introduced a movie solo on TCM was February, 2016. He did continue to appear one night a month with Guest Programmers through, I think, June, although I'm pretty sure these segments were recorded as long ago as the fall of 2015. TCM has continued to air the Bob's Picks, however, and I think they're presently scheduled for at least the next two months, maybe three. It would be a nice reminder of Bob's importance to the network. The network gave us the impression that Bob was continuing to actively pick movies each month. I have no idea if that was really true. After there are no more "new" picks from Bob to be had, possibly they might turn one night a month over to movies he'd picked in the past or that were known to be among his favorites. But I think there will be new introductions for them, not repeats of old Bob introductions, for reasons I stated above.

 

I feel like Ben is maybe more accessible to record impromptu intros/outros as needed then maybe Robert was. I vaguely recall some long-ago social media messages from Robert indicating he recorded his intros/outros in bulk a handful of times a year, well in advance of the airing of any given segment. I'm not going to remember specifics, but I'm pretty sure more than once Robert mentioned a personality who was still living at the time he recorded the intro/outro but who had passed before airing, and TCM didn't fall over itself to make sure Bob was flown in to rerecord that intro/outro or, for all that was great about him, that he would even have done so. They just let it stand. But Ben has obviously had to be ready to come into the studio as needed recently, with all the new material he recorded immediately after Robert's death, and as suggested by others on this thread, it seems likely he rerecorded at least the intros for tonight's programming.

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As I suspected, Ben paid tribute to RO in the opening intro to "Eve".  I guess they must have filmed at least new intros for tonight's line-up so Ben could mention RO's passing. The wrap-ups were likley fine as is.

 

I've been suggesting for years that they recycle some of the old intros for the early morning movies. However, while watching RO's very first intro for GWTW, which re-aired during his 48 hour celebration, it occurred to me that those old intros might need to be digitized for the airing in HD. I also realized that the earliest intros were probably taped and not filmed which might possibly mean they'd need some kind of restoration or color correction as well. Which is probably expensive and there must be something like 20,000 intros or more.

 

The thought of any of RO's intros being lost would be rather ironic, don't you think?

 

Yancey

Weren't "Bob's Picks" typically relatively unknown films? THREE FACES OF EVE is very well-known.

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Here's a random example of Bob's picks I found from January 5, 2009. Bob kicked off with a couple of TCM rarities that night: The Late George Apleby (20th Century Fox, 1947) about a very proper father coming to terms with his nearly grown children making romantic choices of which he might not approve, with Ronald Colman, Mildred Natwick and Peggy Cummins. 

 

And Captain's Paradise (London, 1953) a screwball romantic comedy from the UK starring Alec Guniess as a ferryboat captain who, thanks to travel restrictions between Gibraltar and Spanish Morocco, is able to keep a wife in each port who are unaware of each other's existence (Yvonne DeCarlo and Celia Johnson).

 

While I must have been watching that night to have written down the lineup, I've completely forgotten both films. They both sound worth watching again.

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Lizzie was pretty entertaining, if you can use that word about

a woman with 3 personalities. Not as clinical and sober as

TTFOE, but just as good in its own way. I was a little disappointed

that we never really get to see Beth, the personality that the

psychiatrist wanted to win out over the other two. One thing I

never liked about TTFOE was David Wayne as the hubby. He

was totally annoying, which was the idea, but still. If I was married

to that idiot, I would have had thirty personalities at least. 

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Lizzie was pretty entertaining, if you can use that word about

a woman with 3 personalities. Not as clinical and sober as

TTFOE, but just as good in its own way. I was a little disappointed

that we never really get to see Beth, the personality that the

psychiatrist wanted to win out over the other two. One thing I

never liked about TTFOE was David Wayne as the hubby. He

was totally annoying, which was the idea, but still. If I was married

to that idiot, I would have had thirty personalities at least. 

 

As well as a son named Ellery.   :lol:

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Lizzie was pretty entertaining, if you can use that word about

a woman with 3 personalities. Not as clinical and sober as

TTFOE, but just as good in its own way. I was a little disappointed

that we never really get to see Beth, the personality that the

psychiatrist wanted to win out over the other two. One thing I

never liked about TTFOE was David Wayne as the hubby. He

was totally annoying, which was the idea, but still. If I was married

to that idiot, I would have had thirty personalities at least. 

 

Yeah, I too wondered why the most stable of her three personalities didn't make much of an appearance in this thing, Vaultrin.

 

I mean, it was like it didn't have time for her or somethin'. Uh-huh, you know, kind'a like that dude in that song who he didn't have time for another Beth because he and the boys just couldn't "find the sound". ;)

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist)

 

Btw, I thought Richard Boone was pretty good as the shrink in this, but yeah, the film seemed a bit truncated, didn't it. And another aspect to this film that differentiates it from TTFOE is that Eleanor Parker is actually shown transitioning through to the other character(s), and whereas I don't recall Woodward being shown doing that.

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I could kick myself for watching Lizzie all the way through--but I was determined to see if it ever got entertaining-- good was not going to be an issue here.

 

Several years ago I watched the DVD of Eleanor Parker in Caged; I believe she got an Academy Award nod for that role. And I really love the film that Minnelli directed her in that starred Robert Mitchum, Home from the Hill.

 

So since Lizzie was a RO pick and Eleanor Parker was the star, maybe I was expecting too much. Actually, there's nothing wrong with Eleanor Parker's performance - - the only problem was that the film never reached the heights of her performance--an "A" performance in a "B" movie.

 

The director, Richard Boone and Marion Ross had measured performances that were quite adequate - - while movie star Joan Blondell was over the top, around the corner and back up the street again. Blondell is famous for her star turns in films and in this one took she took the same turn over and over again.

 

Previously, I never heard of this Lizzie. Now I think I would like to forget that I ever wasted time watching it--except I loved Eleanor Parker's work and I thought she really deserved to be in a film equal to her ability.

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Yeah, I too wondered why the most stable of her three personalities didn't make much of an appearance in this thing, Vaultrin.

 

I mean, it was like it didn't have time for her or somethin'. Uh-huh, you know, kind'a like that dude in that song who he didn't have time for another Beth because he and the boys just couldn't "find the sound". ;)

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist)

 

Btw, I thought Richard Boone was pretty good as the shrink in this, but yeah, the film seemed a bit truncated, didn't it. And another aspect to this film that differentiates it from TTFOE is that Eleanor Parker is actually shown transitioning through to the other character(s), and whereas I don't recall Woodward being shown doing that.

With a running time of only 81 minutes, they didn't leave much time

for lengthier plot points. I guess one could argue that it was unlike

the usual Hollywood film in that there was no sudden happy ending

and that cases like this aren't wrapped up in a few days. Still it

would have been interesting to see more of Beth, not as neurotic

as Elizabeth and less "slutty" than Lizzie. Overall, I think it was a

pretty good movie.

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I could kick myself for watching Lizzie all the way through--but I was determined to see if it ever got entertaining-- good was not going to be an issue here.

 

Several years ago I watched the DVD of Eleanor Parker in Caged; I believe she got an Academy Award nod for that role. And I really love the film that Minnelli directed her in that starred Robert Mitchum, Home from the Hill.

 

So since Lizzie was a RO pick and Eleanor Parker was the star, maybe I was expecting too much. Actually, there's nothing wrong with Eleanor Parker's performance - - the only problem was that the film never reached the heights of her performance--an "A" performance in a "B" movie.

 

The director, Richard Boone and Marion Ross had measured performances that were quite adequate - - while movie star Joan Blondell was over the top, around the corner and back up the street again. Blondell is famous for her star turns in films and in this one took she took the same turn over and over again.

 

Previously, I never heard of this Lizzie. Now I think I would like to forget that I ever wasted time watching it--except I loved Eleanor Parker's work and I thought she really deserved to be in a film equal to her ability.

I liked it more than you did, Princess. I expected Joan to be over the top,

which she was. I thought her scenes with Haas were funny. There certainly

wasn't a lot of wasted exposition. Kind of cut and dried, which didn't hurt

at all. I'd give it a B. 

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I found another partial Bob's Picks lineup I wrote down years ago, this one from March 9, 2009:

 

Lured (United Artists, 1947) - The Victorian thriller in which the police recruit Lucille Ball to advertise herself in the personal columns in hopes of drawing out a serial killer. With Boris Karloff, Charles Coburn, Cedric Hardwicke and Alan Napier.

 

A Miracle Can Happen (United Artists, 1948) - Star-studded anthology-style film in which a reporter (Burgess Meredith) goes around asking the question of the day, "Has a little child ever changed your life?". With Henry Fonda, James Stewart, Paulette Godard, Fred MacMurray, Dorothy Lamour, Victor Moore, William Demarest and Hugh Herbert.

 

Harold & Maude (Paramount, 1971) - Well, I probably don't have to describe this one.

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