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[i]All Quiet On The Western Front[/i], 1930


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Well, if you enjoyed "All Quiet" make sure you check out another of Remarque's works: "Three Comrades" (1938). It will be showing quite soon (3/6).

 

Set your hanky somewhere to dry though because you will need it again!

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Isn't that the one with O'Sullivan, Young, and Tone? I remember I watched it because of Franchot Tone and since he was only a supporting player, nearly didn't watch it. I'm a big fan of Tone, and hate that in alot of the movies he plays some creepy brother or something rather than a leading man... But I'm glad I did watch it, it was a touching movie as well. I'm going to watch it again, though. The way this week is going I'll probably be boo-wooing by the end of it, too.

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Yes. That's it.

 

One of my all time favorite scenes is when Tone hunts down that guy in the twisting streets (being delibrately vague here for folks that haven't seen it) while the snow is falling and people are singing Christmas carols. A truly beautifully shot film.

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Was hoping to find a AQOTWF thread this morning and was going to start one if I didnt... Definitely not a "war picture" fan (would never have intentionally tuned into this one), but boy did I get enraptured once I did??? Absolutely beautiful; almost spiritual... The love between the soldiers, the family members, the guy and his girl (loved how they showed just the bedpost; makes me weep for the subtlety lost in today's movies); loved the last scene (compare the two: so much more tasteful AND effective/effecting than the buckets of gore [and profanity] in "Private Ryan"). This will be one of my favorite films now; wept at the end, and that's a rarity.

 

Message was edited by:

otterhere

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Thanks for the post, otterhere. Was this not incredible? Just such a moving film... I love movies that have something to say, and boy did this one. Then ending was just too much - The screen turning black was such a climax.

 

I've seen other war flicks (like Platoon and We Were Soldiers) but none of them made you feel the war like this one... The scene where Paul comes back into the classroom and is asked to say something to the young boys. It is such a powerful scene there, the things he says.

 

I love this movie, it is now not only my favorite war movies... But one of my favorite movies of all time. Thanks, TCM for showing masterpieces like this!

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It is especially sad because young men and women are still losing their lives today in wars that probably could have been avoided, like they imply in the movie, it's a lot easier for politicians to start wars when they can just sit back home and not be in any risk themselves.

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I own the DVD of this, but took the opportunity to see a screening last summer at the National Gallery of Art. People walked out of the theater looking like they'd been hit in the face. I'm surprised we didn't all march on the White House right that minute.

 

A great, great film. No other movie has ever done better at encapsulating the sheer stupidity of war.

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EVERYTHING'S gotta be better in a theatre... Convenience be hanged, I think it's just plain sad that we're all huddled in our little compartments, alone or with one or two others, watching these great works on little, tiny screens (er, except for those of us rich enough to buy the big screens, and I'm not too sure I'm impressed with the quality of the images anyway); the communal experience spirit has been lost.

 

Especially painful for me when there's GREAT choreography on the screen (Seven Brides, West Side Story, Top Hat, A in Paris) and I'm squinting to see the steps!!!

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I'm 20 minutes away from my "local downtown art house," but it's worth the trip...

 

Although increasingly infrequently... Alas, they've begun running new releases available at any suburban multiplex in order to draw crowds... When it's something actually worth seeing (a foreign film, documentary, or classic), I'll be one of about four people in the theatre...

 

When they ran "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" (SPOILER: not a foreign film) for ten weeks straight, the place was packed every night... A b-a-d sign of the times...

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Same thing happened to the Neptune in Seattle, I guess.

 

Part of the problem (at least in *some* theaters) is that occasionally modern movie goers will laugh in all the wrong places or for the wrong reasons whenever they see something that reflects an earlier era. There was a letter about it in last Sunday's Chronicle:

 

Dear Mick LaSalle: Why are people who purport to love old films so merciless and unforgiving of them? During a viewing of "99 River Street" at the Castro Theatre, people laughed at dramatic plot points, factual anachronisms (such as there only being 48 states in the union, true at the time) and violence. There's a sanctimonious snarkiness. How do we get people to take themselves out of their lives and into another time?

 

Kent Hall, San Francisco

 

 

Dear Kent Hall: It's ridiculous. People sit there scoffing, as if history has just stopped, as if the attitudes, mores and customs that they live by aren't also in flux. I have no patience for it, no impulse to indulge it and no feeling of generosity toward it. I think it's idiocy, and, for that reason, I stopped going to the Castro Theatre to see old movies. It doesn't happen at the Stanford Theatre in Palo Alto. David Packard, though probably one of the least pleasant men I've ever met, at least puts his surliness to good use by telling audiences to shut up when they're acting like imbeciles, and so I like going to his theater. The only way the Castro will change is if management decides it wants to change the culture of its moviegoing experience -- and then enforces that change. I suspect about 90 percent of the regular patrons would be relieved.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/02/25/PKGRJN85DS1.DTL&type=movies

 

 

Hope this isn't what happens in your town.

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???

 

The theatre isn't in my town (my town isn't nearly that sophisticated!!!), but in the city "next door"...

 

And there weren't enough people in the "good movies" to laugh... At all... : (

 

Seriously, there will be like three other people and me watching a doc or FF...

 

And this is in a relatively big city!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Just part of the general dumbing down.

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I have to say, if viewing classics openly with other folks got to be like that letter you posted - I'm afraid I wouldn't want to go to the theatre to see any of these movies.

 

Sorry, sometimes I just overlook there are idiots out there that would ruin a good movie... I forget society as a whole is not as intelligent as the folks on this website.

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Well I meant the theater that is near your town... ;)

 

Maybe the size of the city no longer matters that much. Maybe a lot of people just have really nice home theater systems in their houses and enjoy that more than a nice, crisp, 35mm projection in a theater where they can share the experience.

 

Who'd have thought, huh? :(

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JonParker and I live near Baltimore where the "Senator Theatre" lives. It's an old movie house that does on occasion show classic movies. It is still a single screen theater that looks very much like it did in the 30's and 40's. They primarily show current movies but we do get a treat once in awhile.

 

Last week it was just barely saved from the auction block because it was behind on a mortgage. They had a fund raiser where they showed Harold LLoyd's "Speedy." They said they got donations from all over the country. It's about the only place we get a classic movie. (We just don't get enough.)

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