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Trump and North Korea


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After 16 Months, Trump Names An Ambassador To South Korea

The White House has nominated Navy Adm. Harry Harris to be the U.S. ambassador to South Korea, filling a key post that's been vacant for the first 16 months of the Trump presidency.

The president signaled his intention to select Harris in recent weeks. But the formal nomination didn't come until late Wednesday, less than a day before Trump's Thursday morning announcement that he'd called off the planned June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Harris is the head of the U.S. Pacific Command, making him the top military officer responsible for Asia and the Pacific,

and he's known for his hawkish views on North Korea and China........

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/05/24/614109037/after-16-months-trump-names-an-ambassador-to-south-korea?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20180524

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15 hours ago, mr6666 said:

After 16 Months, Trump Names An Ambassador To South Korea

The White House has nominated Navy Adm. Harry Harris to be the U.S. ambassador to South Korea, filling a key post that's been vacant for the first 16 months of the Trump presidency.

The president signaled his intention to select Harris in recent weeks. But the formal nomination didn't come until late Wednesday, less than a day before Trump's Thursday morning announcement that he'd called off the planned June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Harris is the head of the U.S. Pacific Command, making him the top military officer responsible for Asia and the Pacific,

and he's known for his hawkish views on North Korea and China........

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/05/24/614109037/after-16-months-trump-names-an-ambassador-to-south-korea?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20180524

This will prove interesting as to how it is interpreted by China and North Korea.  His mother was Japanese and his father an American sailor.   He has had very friendly relationship with Japanese government.

Major concern is that he will be in a very sensitive diplomatic position with little to no experience in diplomacy and a record of favoring Japan and opposing China and North Korea.   Since there are issues between South Korea and Japan, how will SK really accept him?

Of course, with the Trump administration, not really important who the ambassadors are.

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http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44265287

Korean leaders meet in surprise summit

The leaders of North and South Korea have met in the demilitarised border area between the two countries.

The meeting is only the second between South Korea's Moon Jae-in and the North's Kim Jong-un.

It comes as the two sides continue efforts to put a historic US-North Korea summit back on track.

US President Donald Trump cancelled the summit, scheduled to be held in Singapore on 12 June, but later suggested it might still go ahead.

The latest talks were held on the northern side of the Panmunjom truce village, between 15:00 and 17:00 local time (06:00 and 08:00 GMT), Mr Moon's office said.

"Both leaders exchanged opinions... for the successful holding of the North Korea-US summit," it added, saying that Mr Moon would announce the outcome of the talks on Sunday morning.

In Washington, Trump administration spokeswoman Sarah Sanders confirmed that an advance team of White House and Department of State officials would leave for Singapore this weekend, as originally scheduled, to prepare for a possible summit there.

https://www.rt.com/news/427852-north-korea-moon-jae/

Kim Jong-un and South Korean president hammer out US summit plans

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has held a surprise closed-door meeting with his South Korean counterpart over the cancelled summit with US President Donald Trump.

The meeting is the second of its kind in two months, with the pair sitting down at a location near the demilitarized zone on the Korean peninsula

READ MORE: ‘They’re playing with world peace’: What next for US-North Korea relations?

According to Reuters, this latest discussion centered on the on-off summit that was sensationally scrapped by Donald Trump, who cited “tremendous anger and open hostility” displayed by North Korea’s government after they took umbrage at a comment by US Vice-President Mike Pence.

During a Fox News interview, Pence suggested that the country could become like Libya if it does not disarm its nuclear weapons. When asked if that was a threat, Pence said it was “more of a fact.”

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8 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

CIA report says North Korea won't denuclearize, but might open a burger joint -

Trump continues to pursue a summit with Kim Jong Un even though the CIA casts doubt on his stated goal for the meeting, eliminating North Korea's nukes.
 
:rolleyes:

Yeah, the DPRK said they were just getting rid of the test ground and never said anything about nukes. If there was a chance of getting them to denuclearize, going on about the "Libya model" and staging war games in the RoK certainly isn't the way to go about it. As for the part of the article that says North Korea would be willing to accept outside restaurant chains, I find that extremely doubtful. There are only a few foreign style restaurants in the border towns in the North and they aren't even privatized.

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New B.R. Myers article on denuclearization and North Korea-

http://sthelepress.com/index.php/2018/05/28/and-then-what-b-r-myers/

And Then What? — B.R. Myers

Whenever I’m told that a certain combination of sticks and carrots can induce North Korea to give up nuclear arms, as I’m hearing now, I always respond by asking: “Let’s presume that does happen. And then what? How does the regime go on justifying its existence?”

In my decades of raising this question in discussions, op-ed pieces, blog postings and interviews, no more than one person every two or three years has attempted an answer.

Each of those rare times I have encountered combinations of the following wrong assumptions:

  • that North Korea is a communist or Stalinist state, and can therefore legitimize itself all the more effectively by raising the masses’ standard of living and improving the welfare system;
  • that the national mission is self-reliance, and therefore compatible with the exchange of nuclear might for energy autonomy and other prizes;
  • that North Korea is already a post-ideological, “reactive” state that reconstitutes its politics according to stimuli from without;
  • that the object of a personality cult is so godlike he can change the national mission at will;
  • that by compelling America to abandon its hostility, the regime will score a propaganda victory it can milk indefinitely;
  • that despite the contiguity of a far richer and more populous co-ethnic state, North Korea is under no more pressure to legitimize itself than China and Vietnam, so it can maintain mass support even as the poorer of two economy-first Koreas;
  • that unlike the East Germans in 1989-90, North Koreans will be content enough with annual rises in their living standard not to want the greater, faster improvement that would come with absorption into a richer co-ethnic state;
  • that dictatorships can rule by coercion alone, and thus do not need legitimacy.
  • These errors (on all of which I have expended plenty of ink) reflect not just an ignorance of North Korea, and of dictatorial governance in general. They also show a lack of political common sense: a failure to grasp that every country has an inner political life, which reflects its citizens’ need for transcendent significance — for something beyond mere incomes and calories.

    Case in point: When Western “experts” invoke Kim Jong Un’s alleged fear of ending up like Gaddafi, they do not mean, “He’s afraid that if he compromises with the unifying enemy in the hope that economic growth will keep everyone happy, and embarks on reforms no dictator can carry through on, he will lose so much support at home, and then regional stature, that the US will feel emboldened to finish him off.”

    No, they mean only, “Kim is afraid that if he disarms, the US will attack.”

    Political science, by which I mean nothing more abstruse or academic than consideration of a foreign country as a country in its own right, seems to have been almost completely supplanted by a preoccupation with international relations. What is thought irrelevant to that side of things (often wrongly) is considered beneath notice. This can be seen by the reflexiveness with which journalists now contact I.R. professors or nuclear specialists for comment on North Korea’s motivations, party conferences, personality cult, etc — and the perfect confidence with which that comment is supplied.

    This is not to say that discussion of the current crisis does justice to international relations as a discipline. Usually it is conducted in a very simplistic, moralizing, America-centric fashion, with no apparent sense of history. Much of the stuff on Twitter or in op-ed pieces is all the more embarrassing for having been written from a presumed position of great intellectual superiority to Donald Trump. For all his unsuitedness to be president, the fellow is no more ignorant of North Korea’s political nature than most of his critics are.

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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-northkorea-usa/north-korea-official-set-to-meet-trump-give-letter-in-rare-meeting-idUSKCN1IV2NS/

New twist to diplomatic dance: Trump says North Korea summit now on

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump said on Friday an unprecedented nuclear arms summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that the United States pulled out of will now go ahead as scheduled on June 12 in Singapore, adding another twist to a high-stakes diplomatic dance.

 

After giving North Korea’s former intelligence chief the rare honor of a meeting in the White House Oval Office, Trump dampened expectations for a breakthrough at the summit, which U.S. officials want to use to press Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons arsenal.

“I think it’s probably going to be a very successful, ultimately a successful process,” Trump told reporters on the White House lawn.

Trump described the Singapore summit as the start of a process and not the place where the two leaders were likely to sign any agreement, a stark contrast to his previous insistence that the summit had to yield real progress toward North Korea’s denculearization.

“It’ll be a beginning. I don’t say, and I’ve never said, it happens in one meeting,” Trump added.

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‘He Pretty Much Gave In to Whatever They Asked For’

Trump says he’s a master negotiator. Those who’ve actually dealt with him beg to differ.

........ what made Trump take the meeting in the first place remains the case. With the other negotiating setbacks, the worrisome swirl of the Mueller probe and the midterms mere months away, Trump needs a win. “He got himself into an almost untenable situation from a leverage perspective because he had communicated that he really wanted a deal here

North Korea experts worry about the incoherence and disorganization of Trump and his administration and that they could pay too little attention to tiny but critical details or agree to some type of pact without a firm and enforceable definition of “denuclearization.”

But regardless of what happens from here, a former Trump Organization executive told me, Trump will do what he does. He will try to spin it into a win.

“He believes he’s in a position of strength no matter where or when he is,” the executive said. “You have to understand that. If you knock Donald on his ****, he will tell you the best position to be in is on your ****.”

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/06/01/donald-trump-deals-negotiation-art-of-deal-218584

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What Kim Jong Un Wants From Trump

The United States is playing North Korea’s game. Here’s why that’s dangerous.

.... Kim has more concrete goals that are evident in North Korea’s word and deed, and that happen to also propel North Korea toward the meta-goal of unification, but on terms favorable to the North.

Kim has sought to 1) secure his rule against internal challengers,

2) achieve and demonstrate a reliable nuclear deterrent,

3) improve his people’s quality of life, and

4) elevate North Korea’s international standing as a nuclear state.

Until very recently, his priority has been the first two goals. Having made significant progress on them, with his current charm offensive, Kim is now aiming to do the same for the latter two. .....

 

....The point is that Kim’s diplomacy is a progression of Kim’s strategy. Claiming that it’s the result of South Korea’s negotiating savvy or Trump’s maximum pressure campaign ensures only that Trump shows up to meet Kim with eyes wide shut about his counterpart’s motivations.

Trump might be perfectly happy to ignore the ultimate price and trade-offs of a deal as long as it generates favorable news headlines. But what about the rest of America? "

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/04/30/what-kim-jong-un-wants-from-trump-218115

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Regardless of what takes place in Singapore, Trump will claim a huge victory for himself.  Greatest deal ever.  The sanctions which have existed for years and the increased recent pressure did (we hope) bring Kim to the negotiating table.  Of course, the real pressure was from China and who knows what "deal" they want from Trump in return.  They'll get it too (if they have not already).

What will NK get?  They already have a nuclear weapons system with missile delivery systems and they will not really give them up.  What will SK and Japan get?

Incidentally, a peace treaty is not very much in this situation.  It will be little different from the truce that already exists.  If one is signed, Trump will blow it all out of proportion.

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Depending on Singapore meeting, US will probably have normal diplomatic relations with NK before it does with Cuba.

And maybe that is one thing Kim will require.

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5 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

The meeting of two clowns, one murderous, one not. Boring

They're both murderous. Trump's actions in the mid-east aren't exactly the nicest.

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8 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

I thought China was evil and "ripping us off in trade." :huh: 

It's not China within itself (market) but the lopsided trade agreements of the past.  It's great China has changed from the Mao era.

Be nice though if China stop treating it citizens so rough when it comes to the court system and people protesting.

Edited by hamradio
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1 hour ago, Gershwin fan said:

They're both murderous. Trump's actions in the mid-east aren't exactly the nicest.

From a larger perspective that's true, but Trump doesn't knock off his own relatives

(as far as I know).  :)

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22 minutes ago, hamradio said:

It's not China within itself (market) but the lopsided trade agreements of the past.  It's great China has changed from the Mao era.

Be nice though if China stop treating it citizens so rough when it comes to the court system and people protesting.

I guess you haven't heard how people are treated in North Korea.

I've lived in South Korea and I've heard first-hand some pretty ugly stories.

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Don't forget history and what came from it.

maxresdefault.jpg

 

Yeah, now China is a freedom loving, democratic country. China is the new bully on the

block, throwing its weight around, just as the U.S. was in the 20th century. What goes

around comes around. 

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