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brian34

Technicolor question

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After watching GWTW (again) and marvelling at the wonderful color photography, I have a question for anyone in the know.

.

Are there any books out there that document the development and use of the Technicolor process?

I've always been amazed at how well the colors held up in older films compared to the various other color methods used.

 

I can remember watching films on TV as a kid, and noticing that if the film was in Technicolor it was vibrant and clear, while if it was Metrocolor or some other process they were almost completly washed out and colorless.

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Brian,

 

There is a wonderful documentary on Technicolor called Glorious Technicolor that is part of the The Adventures of Robin Hood box set.

 

The documentary does show up on TCM from time to time.

 

There is also a companion book that has the same title.

 

Also Aljean Harmetz has written two books:

 

On the Road to Tara and The Making of the Wizard of Oz and if I recall correctly, both books do talk about the technicolor process and Natalie Kalmus.

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lzcutter-

 

Thanks that's the kind of info I was looking for. Time to do some searching.

 

 

cinemascope-

 

Thanks- I'll check out the link.

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I can remember watching films on TV as a kid, and noticing that if the film was in Technicolor it was vibrant and clear, while if it was Metrocolor or some other process they were almost completly washed out and colorless.

 

Technicolor is, indeed, a wonderful process, considered the best. However, it may be that what you recall from television was also the result of widescreen films being cropped and blown-up to fill your television picture screen. That always made these films look washed-out. Processess like Color by DeLuxe or Metrocolor or WarnerColor, etc., were much more prominent, during the widescreen era; while Technicolor was used long before the widescreen explosion, and after, as well.

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Well that might depend on what is meant by Technicolor. When talking about the Technicolor in classic movies, a lot of people are actually referring to 3-strip technicolor, the kind used in GWTW, The Wizard of Oz, The Adventures of Robin Hood, etc. This kind of Technicolor needed more complicated cameras (i.e., 3-strip cameras) and was used only until about 1954.

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Technicolor is, indeed, a wonderful process,

considered the best. However, it may be that what

you recall from television was also the result of

widescreen films being cropped and blown-up to fill

your television picture screen. That always made

these films look washed-out.

 

That's possible, I certainly didn't know about pan and scan back in my younger days. But these movies I remember were almost devoid of color. That's what made seeing a Technicolor picture that much more impressive.

Now, I'm talking about the early to mid-seventies here, so the prints used back then were probably less than perfect to begin with.

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