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Everyone who isn't afraid of the truth and just wants a no-holds-barred look at how America's fast food industry works should definitely check this movie out, it's new on DVD this week.

 

A warning - if you watch this movie, you may see things that will make you sick. That might make you never want to eat a hamburger -- or anything for that matter -- in any fast food establishment.

 

Needless to say the fast food chain portrayed in the movie is 100% fictional, but it won't be hard to figure out which real-life chain it is loosely based on! ;)

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I've never seen the film; don't think I could, uh, stomach it.

 

The chains are nowhere to go, IMO, for good, old fashioned American quick food. If one listens or reads Jane and Michael Stern, there is a wealth of regional cooking across this land where people are returning to the "retro" delights of roadside diners, lobster shacks, and the like, that serve hearty food that perhaps wouldn't qualify as fast, but is certainly in your hands faster than a regular restaurant, and is certainly much better for you. I think it's safer and more soul-satisfying to search out places like Doe's Eat Place in the South, for good old fried chicken that's homemade, than to force oneself to a veggie or vegan food regime that might be a bit extreme for the American palate.

 

I suggest the Stern's book "Road Food", which is constantly updated. And listen to them every Saturday at 12 noon EST on NPR on Lynn Rosetto Casper's cooking show, The Splendid Table.

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Love the Sterns on "Splendid Table"... They've also written some really funny books on pop culture (before they got into food; Jane was much thinner then, lol)...

 

Natch, I had to see "Supersize Me, since it was a documentary (I will watch a documentary on paint drying); I thought it was "super"!!! Read FFN...

 

Message was edited by:

otterhere

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This is so much harder to watch than SuperSize Me. With that one you never had to go behind the counter of a McDonalds. Here you get to see the meat-processing plants, the slaughterhouse, everything that goes on behind the scenes.

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This is so much harder to watch than SuperSize Me. With that one you never had to go behind the counter of a McDonalds. Here you get to see the meat-processing plants, the slaughterhouse, everything that goes on behind the scenes.

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Yes, I think they did a book on Elvis, among others.

 

I think I saw some photos of Jane was she was thinner. Michael I know is the type who stays slim no matter what he eats. I wonder what both of their cholesterol levels are, but I think the satisfaction they gain from their luscious descriptions of their dining finds on "The Splendid Table" keep them less stressed, which as we all know contributes to good health.

 

I also love those Rick Sebak PBS programs on hot dogs and ice cream across the country. Makes my mouth water, thinking about, say, a Nu-Way frankfurter with everything on it. (well, they say the uber-red dye is safe)

 

I live in Boca Raton where the dining is less than supreme, although nearby Ft. Lauderdale has better pickings. Here we have anything but homegrown Americana; it's more the upscale cafes that cater to the snowbirds who come down here every winter and then have the nerve to say everything is so expensive.

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[nobr]While I appreciated it's intent, I found SuperSize Me disappointing in that it wasn't a very effective expos? on its intended target. [/nobr]

 

The only thing it seemed to expose is what will happen to someone if s/he gives in to the thought-control advertising ("I'm Lovin' It!" "Gotta Have It!") of the fast-food industry, and eat excessive amounts of semi-enriched garbage as one's only diet.

 

This Fast Food Nation sounds more like what I was hoping for from SuperSize Me in that it sounds like it truly investigates the vile machination of the fast-food industry. I hope it is comprehensive.

 

On an aside, and speaking of fast-food, an excellent film to see is The Yes Men.

 

S A M

[nobr]527.gif[/nobr]

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Well you're probably right -- Supersize Me is practically a candy-coated look at fast food, when compared to Fast Food Nation.

 

However I will say -- Bruce Willis has a single scene that stands out as one of the most menacing turns I've seen in recent movies in the last year, at least. It's scary because it's probably not far from the *real* people in the fast-food business.

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About the Sterns (sorry if off-topic), one of their books describes how they'll order several entrees and just take a few bites of each for their descriptions, leaving most of it... They get strange looks from waitresses, and HOW WASTEFUL, but at least they're not actually consuming 20 meals per day... Although, I agree, it looks like Michael could do that and not gain an ounce (men; grrrr)... Now, how do we sign up to go along on their jaunts as "leftover cleaner uppers," LOL???

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haha, yes, sign me up too. But on the distaff side of eating what you want and never gaining an ounce, I'm thinking of that tiny woman who enters those disgusting eating contests and wins, and weighs something like 95 lbs., then when she's asked what she's gonna do afterwards, says, "oh, I'll have some pancakes and sausages" or something like that.

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Hmm; well, I'm not sure "Supersize Me" was intended to be an expose on Big Business, per se; if anything, it was more an expose on what we're doing to ourselves with our hurry-up, run-here, run-there, no-time-for-anything lifestyle...

 

FFN kind of lost me when they cast actors in roles instead of just making it a documentary; as I say, I read the book. I can absorb the facts w/o the drama.

 

; /

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I actually very much liked the approach they took... to make a documentary would have included lots of interviews with anti-fast food advocates but in all likelyhood the people from the fast food companies would have said "no comment" and simply deny any possibility of wrongdoing on their part.

 

With a dramatized approach, we can take a look at the people inside the industry and why they do the things they do, and how much they fail to do to prepare better food and provide for better working conditions.

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