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Oh, the humanity...I laughed, I cried, a richly rewarding experience for the discerning filmgoer, a puckish satire on contemporary mores and bad dubbing.

"Mo-su-ra!"

 

The coffee was coming out of my nose.

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What? No Mothra fans? No one sneaked a peek at Retroplex last night to catch this or record it?

 

I think it should be up there on the AFI list for greatest films; move over, Citizen Kane. And I think Tom Hanks should include Mothra with his assessment of Jason and the Argonauts.

 

The IMDB board is giving Mothra short shrift. What's going on with everyone??

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I think next time I watch a potentially unintentionally hilarious movie, I'll stick to soda water. That way, when I'm laughing so hard that the soda water is coming out of my nose, it won't stain the couch like coffee.

 

Hope I didn't just gross you out.-

 

"Mos-a-ra!"

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Actually, if seen in the right context, this movie is quite charming. No, I didn't catch it last night, but I have seen it ten times over because I recorded it when I was six. If you don't like kaiju eiga, then you probably won't care too much for MOTHRA. I admit, it takes a certain personality to enjoy Japanese fantasy films, so very few people watch them for more than just laughs. I grew up watching Toho, so I think the memories of these movies from my childhood--when things were a lot simpler--is what makes them so fun for me today. If you didn't grow up watching them, then I can understand them seeming silly to you. Personally, I don't see anything funny at all about MOTHRA. It has a very good sentimental storyline besides all the monster hype.

 

As for the special effects, they are quite a bit of an improvement over the original GOJIRA. Eiji Tsuburaya had seven more years under his belt when MOTHRA came out, and he continuously improved his trade in the interim with RODAN, VARAN, etc.

 

MOTHRA also starred some of Japan's biggest stars at the time. Not only was Hiroshi Koizumi a sort of matinee idol at the time that he stepped into the world of Japanese science fiction movies, but comedian Frankie Sakai (the Japanese equivalent of Buddy Hackett) and Emi and Yumi Ito appear. And yes, like someone else has already mentioned, they were a famous Japanese singing duo known as The Peanuts.

 

So, if you want my opinion, this movie rocks...bad dubbing and all!

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Oh, no, you're wrong - I LOVE IT I LOVE IT! I was laughing because of all the minature sets, the cars and trucks and buildings blown away, but I felt so SORRY for Mothra, and the two "Peanuts" are SO ADORABLE. The dubbing is always hilarious to me, but I did not discount that terrific, metaphysical story line, and with the symbol of Christ! (I thought the Japanese were Buddists?) And when a character picks up the two live girls in his hands, you see him picking up like Barbie dolls. Heeheeee. But this plot is heartfelt, and I LOVE when the caterpillar becomes the giant butterfly moth! And you could sort of see that the actors were enjoying themselves.

 

Godzilla scared me to death; Mothra is hilarious. But SWEET.

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How about 'New Kirk' city?

 

Hey, anyone else ever notice that with Japanese movies when dubbed, the dubbing is often done with a slight accent, but that that isnt done with French or Italian movies??

 

The 'H-Man' is great with that sort of dubbing.

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Yes, New Kirk City highly resembles another place I know. Stock footage of Mothra's New Kirk rampage can be spotted in later entries because of the prolific use of the town's name on the miniatures.

 

The dubbing usually depended on the company that picked up the film for domestic distribution. Sometimes the studios chose to hire-out the job, and other times they did it in-house. Since it was rare for a lengthy, foreign-language, film series to be continuously carried by the same studio back in the day, the quality and style of the dubbing ran all over the map. As an example, Warner Bros. handled a few of the Steve Reeves films (e.g., Hercules Unchained and The White Warrior), but not all.

 

Toho films saw the same sporadic treatment. MOTHRA was carried by Columbia, GODZILLA RAIDS AGAIN by Warner Bros. and ATRAGON by American International Pictures. Thus, the dubbings varied greatly. Additionally, Toho itself dubbed all of its films for the international market so there were usually two English-language dubbings available. American International almost always did their own dubbings, and these language tracks are far superior to the Toho International dubs

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For me, the original Godzilla (the one with Raymond Burr added in) is very somber and very frightening. There is a lot of foreboding and some atmospheric scenes along fishing villages, with wind blowing, thunder, etc.

 

Mothra, on the other hand, is totally charming and at times tongue in cheek. The gtwo little fairy girls have a golden coach that flies, and the "monster" is not menacing really, despite all the destruction she does. She's not from some Western guilt trip nightmare about nuclear energy, just a fascinating and colorful mythological figure.

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Not at all...the original GODZILLA is an ominous film of death and destruction and man's fight against an enemy he helped create. This is accentuated by composer Akira Ifukube's score and the numerous gruesome death scenes scattered throughout the film. Also, the life's of the main characters are very tragic, with a love triangle at the root of it all.

 

MOTHRA, on the other hand, is an upbeat story not designed to convey a warning message like GODZILLA. The plot's interludes are filled with comedic outtakes, and the film has a "happy ending." The score is light-hearted, and the title monster is not hell-bent on destroying mankind--only saving the twin fairies.

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For me, the original Godzilla (the one with Raymond Burr added in) is very somber and very frightening. There is a lot of foreboding and some atmospheric scenes along fishing villages, with wind blowing, thunder, etc.

 

But the one with Raymond Burr isn't the original one, it's the Americanized version. The original was the one without RB. ;)

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I recently bought 'Gojira' on dvd and it also contains the Raymond Burr version. I can't say that I really thought 'Gojira' was better, nor could I say it was worse. I think they are both interesting and entertaining. I think the main thing is how well done the Burr version is done.

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I liked the original better because I always thought there was something goofy about the way Burr's character always seems to be in the middle of the action and yet has such limited interaction with the other actors.

 

Of course, going back and forth between both versions you realize that in many scenes, he was actually filmed talking to a stand-in dressed as one of the characters of the movie.

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