Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Randolph Scott


Recommended Posts

During the 50's Randolph Scott made a series of popular westerns and in a few of them he used the same "town" as the various location settings. For example, in "Decision At Sundown" it was the location used for the town of Sundown I've been trying for some time now to find out if this was an actual external site (such as Old Tucson) or simply a backlot of one of the major studios.

I sure would appreciate any input or possible url addresses where I might find out.

Thanks, pardners!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Gerb, but I've gone that route and even Chuck Anderson of the Old Corral website didn't know the answer. It's becoming an obsession for me because I always liked the look of that "town" and was hoping it still existed on a public tour somewhere such as Mescal orOld Tucson.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, shucks. I'm sorry that didn't pan out. Chuck's helped me on a few pointers as well, but he seems to stay buried in his work. Part of his house even flooded last year.

 

Good luck on your hunt.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, so THAT'S who Randolph Scott was! When they mentioned him in Blazing Saddles, I thought that was just a 1970s thing. I had never heard of him.

 

Black Bart-"You'd do it for Randolph Scott."

Townspeople-*reverently* "Randolph Scott."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi malkat:

 

When I was a little kid, I often got Coop and Scott mixed up because they're both tall and slim with blondish hair. As I got older however, it was easier because to me, Scott has it all over Coop in the looks department. You probably don't have any knowledge of country and western music, but years ago the Statler Brothers had a big hit named 'Whatever Happened to Randolph Scott'. It was a song about 'the good old days' when Scott was a big star and revered almost as much as John Wayne. He always got the bad guys, and hardly ever kissed, or got, the girl.

 

Anne

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...
  • 2 months later...

I saw that documentary and not only was he doing his wife (Betsy Drake) he was having a torrid affair with Sofia Loren during the filming of "The Pride and the Passion". In fact Ms. Drake still cried about during the interview. She must've loved him terribly. Although Cary Grant and Sophia Loren did not happen after all. She kind of used him to get Ponti to apply for that Mexican divorce. Ponti was a married Catholics and wife #1 would not grant him a divorce. It was frowned upon in very Catholic countries such as Italy and Spain.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

After my big search a couple of years ago for that "town" where Randy filmed some of his westerns, I've found that one of the better places they used for his movies is still very much accessible to tourists at will. Remember the scenes in "The Tall T" that involved a mine and mostly outdoor shots? It's where he kills the bad guys and says to Maureen Sullivan "Come on now.....it's going to be a nice day."

 

Anyway, this and other of his flicks were done in the Alabama Hills (Lone Pine) of California and believe it or not, these sites have changed very little since filming days. Even going back to the earliest movies (such as Gunga Din) you can find where they were shot and it looks the same.

 

A Google search for Alabama Hills will give you a lot of sources. It's great fun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know for sure but that "town" must just be on the Columbia back lot. I know that one building with the big facade has been a hotel and a bar ( at least from the outside.) It has also been the setting for at least one Audie Murphy movie and I think one of the late 50's Fred MacMurray westerns.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Brazos wrote:}{quote}

> Anyway, this and other of his flicks were done in the Alabama Hills (Lone Pine) of California and believe it or not, these sites have changed very little since filming days. Even going back to the earliest movies (such as Gunga Din) you can find where they were shot and it looks the same.

>

> A Google search for Alabama Hills will give you a lot of sources. It's great fun.

 

Thanks for the tip, Brazos. It sounds like it'd be closer than, say, Monument Valley, if I ever get a chance to go out there. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

They made a few (:)) films in that location:

 

http://www.imdb.com/List?endings=on&&locations=Alabama%20Hills,%20Lone%20Pine,%20California,%20USA&&heading=18;withlocationsincluding;Alabama%20Hills,%20Lone%20Pine,%20California,%20USA

 

There's another page of them linked at the bottom of the above.

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Anyway, this and other of his flicks were done in the Alabama Hills (Lone Pine) of California and believe it or not, these sites have changed very little since filming days. Even going back to the earliest movies (such as Gunga Din) you can find where they were shot and it looks the same.*

 

 

Brazos,

 

Somewhere in the message archives there are a couple of threads about movies shot up in Lone Pine and about Lone Pine itself.

 

There is a museum up there dedicated to the film history of the area. You can also purchase a map of movie locals and do a self-driving tour and see where *Gunga Din* as well as countless others, especially westerns, were shot.

 

I know I talked about Lone Pine when I wrote about seeing *Gunga Din* earlier this summer at the Academy. The presentation by Ben Burtt before the film included then and now slides of the location as well as home movies from the set shot by George Stevens.

 

Link to the Lone Pine MuseumL

 

http://www.lonepinefilmhistorymuseum.org/museum.htm

 

Edited by: lzcutter on Oct 24, 2009 12:25 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

>>Wow, even 3 Godfathers ! Thanks for the link, clore!

 

You're welcome. There are probably more that just haven't been provided yet by contributors.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...

I got my first look at Ride Lonesome and it was worth the wait. Scott and Steele together again plus Coburn, Best, Van Cleef, and Pernell Roberts all doing great work. Beautiful scenery and color. Almost perfect.

 

The only mark I have against it is that Scott's character is once again seeking revenge/justice for the death of his wife he feels partly responsible for. This device was used in so many of his later Westerns it almost made it seem like "seen one, seen them all". It's a tribute to everyone involved that the other parts of the films-this one included-make the whole worth seeing.

 

Pernell Roberts stands out. In this he is so different from his Bonanza persona or even Trapper John. A native Georgian, he lets his laid back Southern drawling side come out and is likable. You expect he is the villain and will end up in a losing shootout with Scott's character but to our pleasant surprise he is not and does not. Both get what they want and part on friendly terms. The burning tree is a good rather than sad ending.

 

The other question is Lee van Cleef. According to Roger Moore, he was a very big and well respected actor in Europe in the 50'; his mother was a big fan and he was able to introduce them while he was at Warners. Why was this not true here? It took the spaghetti Westerns for him to make a mark in America and he's one of us (New Jersey).

 

If I haven't played spoiler too much and anybody want to see it, you won't be sorry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I go to Twin Lakes and Bridgeport every year to fish (the place where Out of The Past is set), and thus I go to Lone Pine a lot. I have hiked in those hills and it looks about the same as it did when Gunga Din was made. If one goes in April (i.e. before it gets too hot), it is great with the interesting rocks in the foothills and the largest mountain range in the continential USA in the background.

 

I stop and eat at this place in Lone Pine that has a bunch of signed pictures by the stars who made movies there. It is neat.

Link to post
Share on other sites

>>The only mark I have against it is that Scott's character is once again seeking revenge/justice for the death of his wife he feels partly responsible for.

 

I see this as deliberate for several reasons. First, let's face it, Scott was twice as old as the most of the rest of the cast in the Boetticher / Kennedy films. Yet "formula" and audience expectations are usually that the hero goes after the femme lead in the film. Having Scott play a grieving character eliminates both problems. It also enables them to strip the western to the most essential elements.

 

Also, revenge is the motivation for many western heroes. It might as well have been another family member, but as i noted above, making him a grieving widower eliminates another potential script problem.

 

Also many directors revisit themes constantly, the heroes of Capra, Hitchcock and Mann are often found facing similar issues. It just sticks out more with the Boetticher films since he used Scott so frequently.

 

The Kennedy scripts also frequently use the same bits of dialogue. "She ain't ugly" shows up in RIDE LONESOME and again in COMANCHE STATION. Kennedy used the line "There are some things a man can't ride around" in four films.

 

Kennedy will even repeat exchanges of dialogue. There's this from COMANCHE STATION:

 

Nancy Lowe: If-if you had a woman taken by the Comanche and-and you got her back... how would you feel knowing?

 

Jefferson Cody: If I loved her, it wouldn't matter.

 

Nancy Lowe: Wouldn't it?

 

Jefferson Cody: No ma'am, it wouldn't matter at all.

 

And then this from THE CANADIANS:

 

The white squaw: Mr. Gannon?

 

Insp. William Gannon: Yes.

 

The white squaw: If you met a woman, a woman like me, that had been taken by the

Sioux, how would you feel knowing that?

 

Insp. William Gannon: If I loved her, it wouldn't matter.

 

The white squaw: It wouldn't?

 

Insp. William Gannon: No ma'am, it wouldn't matter at all.

 

Because Boetticher does strip it all down to the bare minimum, I prefer his group of films to the Wayne/Hawks trio of RIO BRAVO / EL DORADO / RIO LOBO. There's no padding, no unnecessary and time consuming romances with actresses half the age of the leading man - not that I have anything against such occurrences. It's just that Hawks kept trying to reinvent Lauren Bacall and his attempts did not compare to the original.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Clore, for your reply to me. The defense wins this one; I bow to your logic and facts.

 

I think you?re right about Hawks and his female stars. I saw a lot of Lauren Bacall?s influence in Angie Dickinson?s Feathers character in Rio Bravo I?ve only seen parts of El Dorado but get the same feeling about Charlene Holt?s character. I?ve not seen Rio Lobo.

 

To me much of the sparring between Feathers and Wayne?s Sheriff Chance in Rio Bravo seems forced. I blame it on the dialogue. The scenes that worked showed some chemistry between the two but Dickinson was only in her 20?s and Wayne was 50 but looked much older. I know Bogey and Bacall had a 25 year or so age difference but she seemed older and despite his hard living, not really noticeable as a man in his forties. You are right, Hawks never found that magic with any other combo again.

 

The strange part is that Wayne was to star with Gail Russell in 7 Men From Now, one of the films with the revenge plot, but could not so Scott stepped in. I?m comparing Scott?s work in that to Wayne?s in The Horse Soldiers where his character has lost his wife in surgery and hates all doctors. Scott took better care of himself and looked like a man the newly widowed Annie would decide on as her next husband. (Of course she did; why else did she stay out West instead of going wherever it was she had planned to?)

 

The Scott leading ladies-mostly Karen Steele but also Barbara Hale, Nancy Gates, and Angela Landsbury-were not shrinking violets but real women with courage who spoke their minds and deserved respect. He didn?t always end up with them but that added to the story?s reality.

 

I?ll look at the Scott/Boetticher movies a bit differently now. Thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the compliment.

 

While Scott did age above the neck, the guy was remarkably fit all the way to his last film. He remained broad shouldered and narrow in the hips and supposedly his exercise regimen was just a lot of stretching exercises.

 

He spends a good ten minutes of 1952's CARSON CITY without a shirt on and the guy is lean and muscular. He was just a year short of being a decade older than Wayne and comparing the Duke of LIBERTY VALANCE to Scott shows to the latter's advantage.

 

Scott was a full decade older than James Stewart who should have kept his shirt on in REAR WINDOW. As he got older, Scott did so much embody the seasoned westerner, a guy whose daily activities kept his body in shape but whose face became lined from squinting in the sun all day. Look at the scene in RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY where he's on the horse charging to the rescue of Joel McCrea - that's no double and even if I were half my present age, there's no way that I could stay on a horse galloping at that speed.

 

I wonder if Hawks had Angie Dickinson screen TO HAVE A HAVE NOT at least once. Look at Angie's posturing, there are many similarities, especially with the way each holds the head down while looking up. Some of the dialogue even sounds similar and I think it's to Angie's credit that she didn't try to keep up the impersonation in her later career.

 

One reason though that the attempt to duplicate the Bacall magic fails is that the camera did pick up the charisma between Bogie and Bacall. It was a real-life attraction that is plainly visible, no amount of acing can approximate that bond.We don't even think of questioning the age gap because we already know that it didn't matter to the real-life principals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...