Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

What Hitchcock movies have you seen, and which is the best?


Recommended Posts

I've seen almost everything he made after moving to America as well as the best-known movies he made while still in England.

 

I am particularly fond of: Vertigo, Rebecca, Notorious, Foreign Correspondent, Rear Window, Psycho and Strangers on a Train.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I have seen that some titles have been released ("Murder" is a nice picture), but unfortunately the 3 I mentioned have not been.

 

Sabotage itself is an incredible film that was more hard edged than most movies of that time. I also believe Orson Welles saw the aquarium scene and borrowed it for "Lady From Shanghai".

Link to post
Share on other sites

That was "Lamb to the Slaughter", with Barbara Bel Geddes was the guest star. That's just about everyone's favorite. I also like "The Strange Case of Mr. Pellham", with Tommy Ewell.

 

I don't think Andy ever guested on it, at least not the 1/2 hour show.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion, Hitchcock had five bonafide masterpieces. Five films that, if you ask me, cannot be disputed as some of the very best films ever made. And they are:

 

Vertigo

Rear window

Psycho

North By Northwest

The Birds

 

After that, there are a sleuth of consistently brilliant films, the amount of which I don't think any other director in history has been able to achieve. Those would be:

 

Notorious

Shadow of a Doubt

Strangers on a Train

Foreign Correspondant

The Lady Vanishes

The 39 Steps

The Trouble With Harry

The Man Who Knew Too Much (both versions[/i]

Spellbound

Rebecca

Lifeboat

 

...and others. My personal top ten Hitchcock films are:

 

Rear Window

Lifeboat

Vertigo

The Birds

The Lady Vanishes

Psycho

To Catch A Thief

The Trouble With Harry

North By Northwest

Topaz

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi John----I have Season I and II as well---I watch them over and over. I think they are wonderful examples of screenwriting and I study them.

 

My favorites so far (I haven't seen the other seasons in so long) include:

 

The very first episode, with Vera Miles and Ralph Meeker, called "Revenge." After I saw it I was completely shocked by the ending. Maybe I'm just bad at figuring out mysteries but his shows invariably surprise me with their endings.

 

"The Case of Mr. Pellham" starring Tommy Ewell. This later inspired a movie starring Roger Moore but to me the Hitchcock half-hour version is the superior.

 

"Breakdown", starring Joseph Cotten as a hard-driven, difficult businessman who suffers a car wreck---everyone thinks he's dead but in fact he is only paralyzed and it's truly frightening how you see everyting that's happening to him through his eyes (Cotten narrates his thoughts).

 

"One More Mile to Go" - Starring David Wayne and Steve Brodie. Boy, this sure shows you the importance of getting your brakelights checked regularly!

 

It's interesting that all my choices have one thing in common: they are all episodes directed by the Master himself.

 

Miss G

Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed! Everytime I'd watch one I'd be so impressed and there in the end credits would be "Directed by Alfred Hitchcock".

 

Not that the other directors, especially Robert Stevenson, weren't first rate. I've been impressed and surprised by every episode I've seen.

 

One thing I noticed that separated his espisodes as peculiarly Hitch's "style" was there was invariably a longer sequence filmed entirely without dialogue and almost without any sound. His background in silents never left him and gave him such a command of the "visual".

 

Miss G

Link to post
Share on other sites

Doris Day was better than I expected in the '56 Man Who Knew Too Much, but much prefer Edna Best in the original. Plus the original has Peter Lorre! The most interesting difference is that in the 1934 version the Edna Best character is a confident independent woman; in the 1956 film the equivalent character is a meek little housewife totally under the thumb of her very controlling husband. I did like Jimmy Stewart's performance though - as usual in Hitchcock films his character has a dark side. In this case he's a doctor insanely jealous of his wife's success so he forces her to give up her career to bury herself in some ghastly small town.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Hitchcock did give Jimmy Steward some of the best

> roles of his career, almost as good as those Mann

> gave him.

 

And Stewart rose to the challenge in very impressive fashion. I don't think he ever did anything better than VERTIGO.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...