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Seven Men from Now - Randolph Scott


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I saw this for the first time a couple of weeks ago on the Western channel. It's a good story, and Scott does a good job as usual as the 'good' guy doing a 'bad' job.

 

Anne

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Fred:

 

I hope you got to see this movie and if not watching Hud right now, can let me know your feelings of it. True it's just a routine western but I think the presence of Scott makes it a little more. If anyone was made to be a cowboy, he's it. I watch how people ride horses and he looks like he was made for them. And that horse he rode in this one! have you ever seen such a beautiful animal? I mentioned on another thread how he was revered as much as John Wayne in westerns, but he rarely got the girl, as this one proved.

 

In Comanche Station he went through all sorts of rethinking about the lady he saved. First she was a lady, then probably a bar girl, and finally, back to a lady again. The twist at the end is phenomenal for a western.

 

You never know exactly 'why' he does what he does. Is it because he's a nice guy, or does he have an ulterior motive, like for money, or the girl? I just love him and wish TCM could get more of his movies. He probably did 7 westerns out of any 8 other genres, but he was so realistic, I can see why. Of course, I love westerns so most folks would probably disagree with me. I'm so glad I got the western channel on Encore.

 

Anne

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You'll know when you see it. It's not a normal colored palomino which is usually like blondish, this one is kind of caramel colored with a gorgeous pale yellow mane and tail.

 

I just thought it was pretty.

 

Anne

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Anne,

 

When this first premiered on TCM in November 2005 (Kyle will correct me if I am wrong), TCM also showed a great documentary on director Bud Boetticher.

 

Boetticher worked a number of times with Randolph Scott (pause for chorus effect from Blazing Saddles) and I think you would enjoy it a lot.

 

Am still trying to find the documentary on Ben Johnson Third Cowboy from the Left.

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Can't sleep.

 

You and your Blazing Saddles, I've never seen that all the way through. I watched about the first half hour and turned it off in disgust. I know a lot about it though because three of the guys I worked with saw it so many times, they literally played out scenes during slow times in the office. they were part of the reason I bid on the exec job . . . so I could get away from them.

 

Scott and Boetticher made a lot of movies together, and they were all good.

 

As for Ben Johnson, there was something about him - the Original Quiet Man. He never had a lot to say, but you were always aware of him in the background, ready to jump in.

 

Anne

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Anne,

 

I totally agree about Ben Johnson. As for Blazing Saddles, the only other movie I laughed harder during was Young Frankenstein. BSaddles does have some great send-ups to Westerns and cliches.

 

As for Ben Johnson, I've been hooked on him since seeing "Yellow Ribbon" over 35 years ago.

 

 

The bookends of his career from Yellow Ribbon to Last Picture Show are incredibly striking. One of these days I should watch them back to back again.

 

He is so incredibly handsome and such a gifted rider in his John Ford days. He was a former rodeo rider that either Ford discovered or was brought to Ford's attention and usually did many of his own stunts.

 

I think we better start a thread about Ben so that Randolph Scott (cue chorus) can have this one without fear of hijacking.

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[nobr]Re: Randolph Scott's ability to sit a horse.

I think that only Gary Cooper rode a horse as seamlessly as Randolph Scott. Both men, whose exceptional height must've made the choice of a steed particularly important, seemed to be one with the animal.[/nobr]

 

[nobr]While I think that Seven Men From Now is very well done, I actually prefer another Bud Boetticher Western, The Tall T (1957), in which Scott plays opposite Maureen O'Sullivan. It's simple, straight storytelling with really bad men, (evil Richard Boone, among others), to be vanquished. I particularly enjoyed the no nonsense way that Scott speaks with O'Sullivan throughout the film as their attraction for one another becomes more pronounced. The dialogue, from a script by Elmore Leonard & Burt Kennedy, has a terse eloquence with flinty truths woven throughout the film.[/nobr]

 

[nobr]For example, when Scott realizes that he must make a final confrontation with the low lifes who have waylaid him and his travelling companions, he simply explains to Maureen that, "Some things a man can't ride around". And right after he's disposed of three of the varmints, O'Sullivan starts to get weepy, he chides her gently with a slightly brusque-sounding, "Come on, now. It's gonna be a nice day." *Lol*[/nobr]

 

[nobr]I also like the John Sturges low budget, unpretentious and well acted, The Walking Hills (1949) with a fine cast, led by Mr. Scott, and including Ella Raines and Arthur Kennedy. Both of these Westerns show up from time to time on the Encore Western Channel too. [/nobr]

 

[nobr]While his Westerns are highly enjoyable, an "Eastern" about the pioneer days in the area that I currently live in here in upstate NY is a particular favorite of mine. The Last of the Mohicans (1936), in which Scott plays Hawkeye is rousingly good, though the Michael Mann version with Daniel Day-Lewis is well told, too. Others in the 1936 cast worth noting include Robert Barrat, who is a fine Chingachgook & Bruce Cabot, as that bad apple, Magua, who really scared the dickens out of me when I was a kid.[/nobr]

 

[nobr]I am also a pushover for Randolph Scott's turns with Shirley Temple, I blush to admit. Mr. S. is jaw-droppingly handsome and tender with Shirley in Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm(1938) and Susannah of the Mounties (1939). Yes, I'm a sap, but that's a fact that I faced a long time ago.[/nobr]

[nobr]2s5xsp[/nobr]

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Moira:

You're so 'in tune' with subtleties and define them so well, it makes me envious at times. I get a 'lock' on something, and know just what I want to say, then you come along and say it so perfectly, that I prefer to just sit back and read your description. Thank you for that.

 

Also, thank you for the beautiful photo. Shirley of course, looks like a little ice cream sundae, all sugar and light. But Scott looks scrumptious! As I said before, nothing against Coop, but Scott had it all over him in the looks department IMO - not humble at all! At the moment, I'm killing time for 15 mnutes until Comanche Station comes on. Scott's movies are ones I can watch over and over.

 

My friends always teased me about being caught at both ends of a century - Old West to the New Frontier.

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

Anne

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Cinemascope:

 

Scott, like Coop, but better, always had such command of each situation. Even when faced with a showdown between he and 3 opponents, you knew he would 'clean up' the place, not because of the good guy/bad guy scenario, just that he was a leader. He didn't seem 'movie-ish'. I'm not expressing myself well, but I hope you know what I mean.

 

What made him great in your estimation?

 

Anne

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Well, exactly that, you knew he would "clean up" and take care of the bad guys no matter what they tried. Basically that he was conventionally handsome, willing to defend the women from all the bad guys, and knowledgeable about the local tribes and their ways. Daniel Day-Lewis wasn't bad, but I like Scott better! :D

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I wouldn't argue with anyone about Randolph Scott's ability to "sit a horse," but I really feel he had some very prominent equals. Joel McCrae was the smoothest rider I've ever seen, nevr letting daylight show beneath him no matter what the conditions. Ditto for John Wayne (thanks to Yakima Canutt's excellent tutoring.)

 

As an interesting side note, I found out this past week that Yakima Canutt was NOT an American Indian, but of European heritage. His first name was actually Enos.

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