Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

On The Town(Movie Vs. Play)


Recommended Posts

I like the movie musical a lot better than the stage production, which when put on stage today, can only vaguely approximate the time and place when the musical was written. In that sense, the movie is a much better time capsule of that happy time in post-WW2 America, and the location shooting in NYC, limited as it was, helps us travel back to that time. B-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

While "On the Town" is a very entertaining film with a stellar cast, I find the Leonard Bernstein score from the original Bwy production glorious. Louis B. Mayer disliked the original Broadway production, only after MGM invested in it, due to a black woman & white man dancing in a ballet scene, and for the fact that he found the songs too avant-garde for film audiences of the 1940s. All the songs in the film, except for "New York, New York", "Come Up to My Place", "Miss Turnstiles Ballet", and "A Day in New York" were replaced with new conventional songs by Roger Edens. It was Leonard Bernstein who said that he would never have written a song with a title so obvious as "On the Town" for the Broadway Production. Nothing in the film beats Bernstein's ballet music and several of the songs from the original Bwy production. Don't get me wrong, the film provides great entertainment for me. Nothing in the play beats the on location shooting, Ann Miller's "Prehistoric Man", or the gorgeous techicolor.

 

MGM had a great year in 1949 with high grossing musicals like "On The Town", Take Me Out To The Ballgame", "Neptunes Daughter, "The Barkleys of Broadway", "In the Good Old Summertime" and "That Midnight Kiss". It's still interesting to note that the highest grossing film of 1949 was the Columbia musical hit "Jolson Sings Again" with Larry Parks.

 

PFriedman

Link to post
Share on other sites

> MGM had a great year in 1949 with high grossing

> musicals like "On The Town", Take Me Out To The

> Ballgame", "Neptunes Daughter, "The Barkleys of

> Broadway", "In the Good Old Summertime" and "That

> Midnight Kiss".

 

1949 was also the silver anniversary of MGM. Sadly, L.B. Mayer would be ousted within a couple of years; the death of the studio system and the threat of competition from television also were just around the corner.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...