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Gremlin seeks DVDR advice


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When more than one machine of a given brand is set up in the same space there are usually procedures to change the remote control/machine operating codes. See your owners? manuals for specific instructions for your products.

 

Up to three Panasonics may be set up in the same space. In the Panasonic setup menu the machine operating codes, 1, 2, or 3 may be set. Then, on the remote, one holds down ENTER for several seconds while also holding down the 1, 2, or 3 to correspond with that particular machine's code.

 

In my "dubbing center" there are four Panasonic combo recorders and two Toshiba VCRs. One of the Panasonics and one of the Toshibas have been placed offset, just below and set back from the table top, in order not to have problems with conflicting remotes. I have placed stickers on each of the remotes and machines to identify them according to their operating code. When giving commands to machines with shared operating codes I make sure the remote is held close to its machine so that signals do not stray to the other same-coded machine. These machines are all within reach from my chair.

 

In the last few days my wife stopped using her kitchen TV, a 13 inch RCA that's a twin of the one in my dubbing center. I have now incorporated that RCA into the dubbing center, connecting it to the Panasonic and Toshiba that are offset from the others. The two RCA TVs are just 18 inches apart, about six feet from my chair. (As far as I may ascertain the multiple operating code feature is not available on these TVs.) I use a single remote control with the RCAs, aimed at the input sensor on the TV I wish to control. Once the TVs are on, the only remote adjustments I use are for volume control.

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  • 2 weeks later...

As I?ve recently turned my attention to editing and compiling, the necessity for hard drive DVRs and combo recorders becomes very clear. But where are those for the US market?

 

GOVERNMENT MAKES OUR LIVES BETTER, CONTINUED. Recent DVRs and combo recorders, including hard drive models, were discontinued due to government requirements that such products (those equipped with tuners), must be equipped with digital tuners beginning with those manufactured in March 2007.

 

As a result several manufacturers of combo recorders have dispensed with tuners, marketing "line in" products that may only record from external tuning devices that have AV or SVHS outputs. (These new products without tuners do not have coaxial inputs.) These products may be used for stand-alone dubbing or as VHS/DVD "players." Know what you are buying so that you will not be inconvenienced by a product that lacks tuning capabilities.

 

Some manufacturers are marketing products with digital tuners. These "digital" products are more expensive than the "analog" products they replace.

 

The government and video industry wide boondoggle shifts into high gear when the basic digital converter coupon program hits consumers in January, 2008. The shutdown for analog tuned devices occurs in February 2009.

 

PANASONIC DUBBING DISCUSSION, CONTINUED. With much practical dubbing experience I offer comment concerning Time Limited and Flexible Recording dubbing, features found on several recent (but not current) Panasonic combo recorders. These features are essential for use in an extensive dubbing project.

 

How does the lack of Time Limited and Flexible Recording dubbing impact a dubbing project? Quite simply it means that one may not set up dubbing and then leave the combo recorder to do its work entirely on its own. One must be there to supervise dubbing.

 

Without Time Limited and Flexible Recording Dubbing, my dubbing project might possibly have taken years instead of months.

 

Discontinued Panasonic combo recorders DMR-ES30V, DMR-ES35V, DMR-ES45V and DMR-ES46V have the essential Time Limited and Flexible Recording dubbing features. If facing an extensive dubbing project today, my advice is to choose from these Panasonic models. If one doesn't find these models new (with a one year warranty), one may find them factory refurbished by Panasonic (with a 90 day Panasonic warranty) offered by several online sources. The prices are usually reasonable. (Note: these models have analog tuners, still useful into February 2009. These models will still be useful for stand-alone dubbing or connection to digital tuning devices after analog tuning is obsoleted in February 2009.)

 

Do the current Panasonic DMR-EZ37V and DMR-EZ47V combo recorders have Time Limited and Flexible Recording dubbing?

 

On 9/13/07 I emailed Panasonic seeking a clarification concerning current model combo recorders. I specifically asked if Panasonic models DMR-EZ37V and DMR-EZ47V have the Time Limited and Flexible Recording features for Dubbing/Copying videotapes. Here is their response:

 

"Thank you for your response. We do not have a Time Limit copying feature on our unit. You are able to dub from one driver to the other. Flexible Recording is only operable with recording and not copying. We hope this information is helpful to you. Thank You, Panasonic Consumer Support"

 

Current Panasonics have Time Limited and Flexible Recording available only for scheduled and menu-initiated recording, not copying/dubbing.

 

Models without Time Limited and Flexible Recording dubbing features are fit for occasional dubbing by those with unlimited time and patience.

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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  • 2 weeks later...

My earlier post, the second below this one, has been revised to address several issues, including the removal of tuners from some new products due to govenment regulation leading up to the shutdown of analog broadcast technology in February 2009.

 

Your government has been at work on this "digital revolution" since 1998; and, in collusion with industry, to take money, grow government, and make life better. "Better for whom" do you ask? To ask the question is to answer it.

 

Govenment is more than your friend; it's your mommy and daddy.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello All;

 

I too, have a set-top dvd recorder and use it to record TCM among may other things.

I have been using mine almost a couple of years.

I have found several things about them in general;

The main thing you have to remember is garbage in garbage out,

which means your finial product is directly related to what you pipe into it.

As no set-top dvd recorder uses HDMI inputs yet( or likely will in the near future)

and your recording standred definition material through rca inputs or S-video at best your finial dics should be at least as good as what you were watching.

The other thing to remember is recording speeds. Mine will record up to like 8 hours, which I've never used.

The best setting is SP, which is dvd quality, But your not getting dvd quality from your source, satlite receiver so theres no reason to use that. On top of that, you only get a hour of material on the disc at that speed. I generally use the next speed down, which gives a little better then 2 hours, which works for most stuff,

except for "North by Northwest", which is well over 2 hours, so you bump the speed down one more level and it still looks pretty good. If you bump the speeds down for more time you notice a serious image quality problem.

As for the disc themselves, I get the 50 spindle packs and they generally work fine. The only thing is try to get a name brand, as I found on rare occasions some other dvd players don't like the cheaper discs, I have played mys disc on such players as the ps2 and they played fine., I have a big disc book that I put the disc in when they're done,

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I too, have a set-top dvd recorder and use it to record TCM among may other things.

I have been using mine almost a couple of years.

I have found several things about them in general;

The main thing you have to remember is garbage in garbage out,

which means your finial product is directly related to what you pipe into it.

As no set-top dvd recorder uses HDMI inputs yet( or likely will in the near future)

and your recording standred definition material through rca inputs or S-video at best your finial dics should be at least as good as what you were watching.

The other thing to remember is recording speeds. Mine will record up to like 8 hours, which I've never used.

The best setting is SP, which is dvd quality, But your not getting dvd quality from your source, satlite receiver so theres no reason to use that. On top of that, you only get a hour of material on the disc at that speed. I generally use the next speed down, which gives a little better then 2 hours, which works for most stuff,

except for "North by Northwest", which is well over 2 hours, so you bump the speed down one more level and it still looks pretty good. If you bump the speeds down for more time you notice a serious image quality problem.

As for the disc themselves, I get the 50 spindle packs and they generally work fine. The only thing is try to get a name brand, as I found on rare occasions some other dvd players don't like the cheaper discs, I have played mys disc on such players as the ps2 and they played fine., I have a big disc book that I put the disc in when they're done,

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Years ago I dubbed a number of audio cassettes to videotape due to the six hour capacity and high quality HI-FI audio reproduction. In those days most HI-FI VCRs could read and play these videotapes. Then I discovered that some VCRs could not read audio-only recordings so I began recording the audio combined with unrelated video input from another VCR tuned to random cable channels. One very interesting result came with the audio of Helen Kane's "I Wanna Be Loved By You" combined with a Heart music video. Just as Helen Kane comes to "You" one of the Wilson sisters points directly at the camera. There are several other very amusing Kane/Heart audio/video alignments in that song. What a hoot!

 

But what of the audio only content videotapes when played on a Panasonic combo recorder? The audio could not be heard on the VCR section. Nevertheless I (blindly) dubbed these videotapes to DVD. It worked. Panasonic combo recorders now play the audio-only DVD content just fine!

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While some manufacturers of combo recorders and DVRs no longer equip some of their products with built-in tuners some manufacturers are offering products that have built-in analog and digital tuners.

 

I just purchased one of the new analog/digital tuning Panasonics, a DMR-EZ17, an entry level DVR. This model tunes analog and digital signals up to channel 135 range. Perusal of the Specifications section of the Operating Instructions for other Panasonics, DMR-EZ27, DMR-EZ37, DMR-EZ47 and DMR-EZ475 (and their variants) indicates this same channel tuning range.

 

The DMR-EZ17 tunes several local digital and/or High Definition channels (but the HD channels are viewed and recorded in standard definition) as additional channels usually next to their analog broadcast twins. Most of these digital channels that are transmitted in HD are assigned to the 700 channel range by our Comcast Cable service.

 

As with earlier Panasonics the DMR-EZ17 recording quality and playback is first rate.

 

Our local Comcast service places TCM on channel 501, an encoded digital channel that requires the use of a digital cable box.

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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ANALOG TO DIGITAL TV TRANSITION, ANTENNA RECEPTION. For those receiving TV from an antenna an important date is approaching. The taxpayer-funded coupon program for digital to analog converters begins on January 1, 2008. This program provides up to two $40 coupons per household toward the purchase of two government-approved converters. These converters will tune digital broadcast stations and convert these digital broadcast signals to analog so that one may continue to use analog TVs. The government has determined that analog TV broadcasting ends in February 2009. Many broadcast stations already have companion digital channels that may be received by TVs and DVRs with digital tuners, required on all tuner-equipped TVs and DVRs manufactured since March 1, 2007. To circumvent these requirements most low-end VCRs and VCR/DVD combos no longer have tuners. These devices record only from external tuning devices through RCA inputs (yellow for video and white/red for audio).

 

ANALOG AND DIGITAL CABLE RECEPTION. Cable providers have been converting to digital technology for several years. Most cable systems still offer some portions of their channel lineups as analog signals. These are the so-called cable-ready channels that may be tuned by analog TVs, VCRs, and DVD recorders without a digital cable box. The digital channels require digital converter boxes. These boxes convert digital signals to an analog format for analog TVs, VCRs, and DVD recorders.

 

Cable is not directly subject to the government mandated February 2009 change-over to digital broadcasting.

 

For those with digital cable converter boxes there will not be such a drastic change in the run-up to February 2009. Perhaps many channels may change to new locations. At some point cable providers must also transition to an all-digital format. I don?t know if the date for that change-over has been determined.

 

COPYRIGHT PROTECTION, ENCODED DIGITAL SIGNALS AND HOME-RECORDING. I have read some postings on another discussion board concerning copyright protection added to or incorporated in original program content by movie/program producers, satellite and cable programming services (HBO, Showtime, etc.), and/or down the line on "digital and/or HD" signals by satellite and cable providers (DishTV, Comcast, etc.) and even by local broadcast stations.

 

This raises a number of questions, especially that of encoding and copyright protection of digitally transmitted programming. The answers to such questions may become clearer with more widespread use of digital tuners in those current model DVD recorders equipped with tuners. (I have one DVR with a digital tuner. It tunes analog and digital signals only up to the 135 channel range. My local Comcast Cable places TCM on digital encoded channel 501 that requires a digital cable box.)

 

These discussions mention that copyright encoding may allow one recording (so-called "fair use"), no recording, or unrestricted recording of such encoded copyrighted material. As I understand it these restrictions have been incorporated very effectively into digital and HD transmissions and tuning technology.

 

This copyrighting technology is now going to become a more serious consideration for the home archivist.

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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  • 5 weeks later...

Talkietime (or anyone else): With your knowledge of Panasonic dvd recorders, what is your opinion of this model:

 

Panasonic DMR-EZ37S Progressive DVD/VCR Combo Recorder (Silver) w/ DV Input

 

I can't locate many reviews on this product, and I'm wondering if you have one and could advise whether you thought it a decent machine. As before, I'm looking mostly for EASE of use and a relatively painless process of transferring vhs tapes to dvd-r.

 

Thank you!

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I went to my favorite electronic/computer place, TigerDirect.com and found a JVC combo unit that has a DVD recorder along with a vcr in the some unit its expensive at 199.00 but It looks like the idea way to transfer vhs tapes to dvd with fuss, Look around on the site they have many cheaper unist, but I think thats the only one thats dvd recorder/vcr http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3070957&CatId=1702

 

Message was edited by: kennethlawson

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My Pleasure, I've had very good luck with TigerDirect, over the years, They have several models from less the 100.00 to the one I sent you the link from. If you go from the front page, use the left menu and select Electronics and go though the menus until you find what you want, They have a good selection and good pricing and good shippings..

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Earlier in this thread I mentioned, in several posts, the Panasonic DMR-EZ37V combo recorder, a 2007 model.

 

Yes I read those, but this model is numbered DMR-EZ37S which is what threw me, I didn't know if it was the same thing. I really wish they'd name these devices the way car manufacturers name new models. :P It seems crazy they would make newer models with fewer features than older ones! I still have the recorder you recommended bookmarked as well and from what you say, it's preferrable when it comes to dubbing a large number of vhs tapes (which most all have many movies on them).

 

Thanks very much for your help!

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I have characterized current analog/digital DVD recorders as part of a ?new generation,? when such products may be the first of the ?final generation? of DVD recorders. Why is that?

 

Two Acts signed into law by Bill Clinton, The "No Electronic Theft" Act (1997) and The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (1998), and the Regulations and Agency decisions that implement these Acts (under the Bush Administration) have brought forth a massive collusion that grows government agencies (through auctions of new/old bandwidth, new regulations/fees and their administration, with more private and public sector employees and growth for public sector unions; and all this also serves the interests of the entertainment industry, service providers, and equipment manufacturers.

 

With the coming of digital tuning technology there are today fewer hard drive/DVD recorders being offered in the US consumer marketplace than just a year ago. In a few years DVD recorders that may record from antennas, cable, and satellite may vanish from the marketplace.

 

Digital and HD technology incorporates more sophisticated copyright encoding. Such encoding may originate from movie/program producers, programming services (HBO, Showtime, etc.) cable and satellite providers (Comcast, Dish, etc.) and even local broadcast stations.

 

Digital technology provides a better viewing experience but limits the ability to record. This technology is being welcomed today by many who do not understand where this technology leads.

 

Digital and HD transmission and tuning technology flags are very effective at preventing or restricting the recording of copyrighted material.

 

There is no requirement that copyright holders must allow recording of their product. Some copyrighted programming content allows for "fair use" i.e., one recording on hard drive recorders provided by cable and satellite services. These recorders can not produce a DVD recording.

 

There is lively and sometimes heated discussion of such matters on technical forums.

 

General consumer product manufacturers are moving away from producing products mired in a quagmire of copyright issues; and where consumers will complain that such products are defective as they may no longer record some copyrighted material to DVD.

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I hate to say it but probably going to get worst before it gets better, The major problem boils down to copywrite holder, be it the studios, production company's, distributors, who ever owns the rights to piece of material has the world by the "You Know Whats" They can say and limit how it is distributed and probably even monitor when and where you do watch it. As long as the public continues to uses services like Netflicks that do downloading to your machine i read a article on Slashdot about a guy who got a new hd monitor and suddenly everything he'd bought from Netflix would play; Heres the link to the story; http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/01/03/2339248&from=rss The name of the Article is "HD Monitor causes DRM issues with Netflix" If the link don't work.

This exactly the reason they won't do a digital input in things like DVD recorders, Its safe to say we're going to see more of this kind of hardware/drm issues in the future and its possible we may even see these types of issues with pvrs also as broadcaster are forced to put in bugs or codes in the digitial stream to prevent them from being recorded to pvrs, also the possibility of dumbing down pvrs in other way is very real.. I have written several articles on theses subjects that you folks might find interesting, they are on my blog scroll through and find the ones on tech, they're in Oct, the link is kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/..... Getting down off my soapbox... for now...

 

This exactly the reason they won't do a digital input in things like DVD recorders, Its safe to say we're going to see more of this kind of hardware/drm issues in the future and its possible we may even see these types of issues with pvrs also as broadcaster are forced to put in bugs or codes in the digitial stream to prevent them from being recorded to pvrs, also the possibility of dumbing down pvrs in other way is very real.. I have written several articles on theses subjects that you folks might find interesting, they are on my blog scroll through and find the ones on tech, they're in Oct, the link is kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/..... Getting down off my soapbox... for now

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have a $99 DVD recorder which I have hooked up to one of my old HIFI VCR player/recorders. Using simple audio/video cables (yellow=video/red-white=left/right channel) I plug one end into the OUT connection of the VCR player and the other end plugged into the IN connection of the DVD recorder. I have copied all my old vcr tapes to disc in this simple inexpensive manner.

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