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Gremlin seeks DVDR advice


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Kenneth,

 

While I seldom watch or record sporting events the Super Bowl was of special interest to a relative so I recorded the whole event with my Panasonic DMR-EZ17 DVD recorder (with NTSC and ATSC tuning). The game was recorded at the LP speed (four hours per disc) on two discs.

 

This DMR-EZ17 is set up cable ready (without a cable box) on Comcast. I watched portions of the game on a LCD HDTV connected to the same cable feed through a splitter. This TV (with NTSC, ATSC, Clear QAM) produced stunning picture quality when watched live.

 

As the LP setting on my Panasonics always produces very good picture quality I was dissappointed when I sampled the LP recording through both the component and composite inputs to the same TV. I found the recorded images to be of only poor to fair picture quality. There were random digital artifacts and a generally fuzzy picture, even while the players were standing around between plays. Action scenes were even worse. The commercials seemed to be of much better picture quality.

 

This is probably an example of DRM impact upon home-recording.

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I'm going to guess its was the type of connection and the quality of the cables mostly at this point, You ever notice when you buy a consumer electronics they always come with those thin little RCA cables and maybe a thin s-video cable, First thing I'd do is swap them out for bigger heaver cables, I'm not saying get Monster cable which cost big buck, but defiantly better cables, I do ntice a little better picture when I can use the heavier cables,

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  • 2 weeks later...

talkietime, I've read and reread your excellent posts, but am still not finding something. I apologize if I am being dense, but you note that the speed of a DVD transfer of an 8 hour VHS tape can be changed to 8 hours by going to the 'setup menu'.

 

You refer, I believe, to the Panasonic DMR-ES35V, which I have.

 

I cannot, and I have searched, find this piece of instruction. It is imperative for me to make this change, as I have not yet begun to transfer my VHS tapes (which are mostly 8 hours) and need to so edit the tapes.

 

Also, I am better off purchasing TDK DVD-R DVDs, if I am understanding correctly? With the recent nod to Blu-ray by Walmart, I am afraid these DVDs will be taken off the market, and, at any rate, should begin my long overdue transference.

 

Thank you in advance.

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Laramie66,

 

Thank you for you kind words.

 

To set or reset the default recording speed for EP press FUNCTIONS, OTHER FUNCTIONS, SETUP, DISC, SETTINGS FOR RECORDING, RECORDING TIME IN EP MODE, ENTER, then choose 6H or 8H, ENTER, then press RETURN two or three times to escape the Functions process. That information is found on pages 56-57 of the DMR-ES35V Operating Instructions.

 

I have found that the most useful method to transfer videotaped recordings to DVD is through the menu initiated process. Press FUNCTIONS, COPY, and then customize the settings for Time Limited and/or Flexible Recording. That information is found on pages 46-49 of the Operating Instructions.

 

I have found that some T-160 videotapes recorded at the EP speed may not track well on some DMR-ES35V VHS sections. If tracking adjustments (Channel UP/DOWN) do not overcome this problem it may be necessary to attach an older VCR to one of the DMR-ES35V Inputs and transfer your videotapes in that manner. That information is found on page 50 of the Operating Instructions. Keep in mind that most videotapes may record somewhat more than their capacity designation, say, an 8 hour tape may contain as much as 8:10 of recorded material. With the DMR-ES35V the absolute upper limit for recording to DVD is 8:00, even with Flexible Recording.

 

For archival recording I regularly use TDK and Maxell DVD-R discs as reliable, inexpensive, and most compatible with other players/recorders.

 

The move to Blu-Ray as the standard for high-end commercially recorded DVDs is not related to home recording of DVDs. While Blu-Ray DVD players may play home-recorded DVDs there are no recorders that home-record Blu-Ray discs.

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Thanks once again, talkietime. I'll keep this post with my booklet.

 

I found it in the manual, just where you said.

 

When you say 'track well', should I be monitoring on the television screen what I am copying? Or, as I thought I could, just hit record and leave the machine to do its thing?

 

Glad to hear on the Blu-ray. I interpreted it to mean that the DVDs I need to copy would no longer be available, that suddenly there would be only Blu-ray DVDs!

 

I have approximately 450 8-hour VHS tapes to copy, and that's a lot of tapes to buy -- for me, at any rate.

 

I appreciate your concise and professional information.

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Laramie66,

 

You should occasionally monitor the process on your TV to determine that the DMR-ES35V is satisfactorily tracking the videotape.

 

If you use the front panel copying control the videotape will play and the Panasonic will record until a videotape index mark or other "program break" is encountered. At that point the DVD will stop recording; the videotape will stop and then rewind briefly; the videotape will start playing and the DVD will restart recording as a new "title." This annoying process is characteristic of front panel copying.

 

The menu-initiated copying process (or external VCR method of copying) provides for seamless DVD recordings, much to be prefered.

 

My "selective" dubbing project copied material from around 1,900 home-recorded videotapes I had recorded over a twenty-year period. That dubbing project took about ten months, concluding in September 2007. From March 2007 onward there were usually at least four Panasonics running up to sixteen hours per day. Occasionally there were up to seven Panasonics running up to eighteen hours per day. My six most freqently used Panasonics average more than 3,000 recording hours per machine. To provide additional air circulation/cooling during the warm summer months I set up external cooling fans.

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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Thats what you want, a standred dvd-r should work in any dvd recorder, At this point I wouldn't be worry about Blue-Ray recording. That will take some time for hd set-top dvd recorder to show up.. And there will probably be DRM built into the units when they do come out..

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Laramie66,

 

Again, the Blue-Ray situation has nothing to do with the marketplace supply of home-recording media.

 

The link is to the right kind but that price is way too high. You will do better to purchase these discs at just about any of your local stores. If you want to order discs online you should get Taiyo Yuden DVD-R discs (not found in retail stores). This brand is generally considered to be the best. (Unless you will be burning DVD copies on a computer's DVD burner you need not be concerned with "X" speed ratings. Currently available DVD-R discs from good brands are fine for use on a DMR-ES35V.)

 

Watch the Sunday newspaper ads at local chain stores and office supply stores (Office Depot, Staples, Office Max). Usually you will find spindles of 100 TDK or Maxell DVD-R discs on sale for under $25.00. Of course, spindles of 50 will be priced about half that price. Last week Office Max had Verbatim spindles of 100 DVD-R discs priced at $19.99. Don't purchase "store brands" or Memorex.

 

Recently Costco had TWO spindles of 100 TDK DVD-R discs for the price of one $31.99, under $16.00 per spindle!

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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They're right about buying the spindle packs, they're way cheaper, only problem is you need something to put them in when they're done...lol I have Big cd/dvd case that has 16 pages that hold 4 disc on each side, I have it about half filled up already, I think I can get extra pages when those are filled up.. I would also try the finished disc on different machines if possible to make sure they play ok,, they should but one never knows...lol

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I keep my burned DVDs in large book-type albums. The most recently purchased albums each contain 320 DVDs. I bought five of these albums last spring at CompUsa for $9.99 each. The last one of these is now a little over half full so I'll be looking for more of these soon.

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Glad we could help. You. If you noticed I mentioned DRM in my earlier post, DRM is Digitial Rights Management. Which is a broad term for many forms of copy protection. I have a blog that I have written up a number of my thoughts on technology and media in general. You can read my blog at;

http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/ Let me what you think.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've read through these and I don't think I caught anything on this topic.

 

I have a Panasonic EMR-ES35V. It's been fine except for a clock that runs fast. It does a fine job copying my tapes but I noticed that the quality of color films is not that great, especially on newer films. (Last night "Unforgiven" looked great while I watched it on TV. This morning the DVD didn't look so great. Not awful, just not great and not near as good as the TV picture.)

 

I have the hook up is that the cable comes through the box to the recorder and on to the TV. When the machine is off the picture is terrific.(It's digital.) Recordings then come off with a bit of a grainy look to it. I have no other cables than the basic cable coming from the box.

 

I have tried a variety of discs but the condition seems uniform. Could the unit weaken the power to reduce the signal quality? Is it normal? If not, any ideas?

 

Thanks.

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Movieman1957,

 

For color recording the LP or better speed is best.

 

Another possibility is that your DMR-ES35V is not set with a compatible setting for your TV. To check this go to FUNCTIONS, OTHER FUNCTIONS, SETUP, TV SCREEN. For detailed information see the Operating Instructions, page 18 (Selecting television type), page 21 (Removing Interference), page 37 (Video menu-Change picture quality, and page 68 (Progressive/Interlace).

 

To reset the clock go to FUNCTIONS, OTHER FUNCTIONS, SETUP, CLOCK SETTINGS. From there you may set up your clock automatically or manually.

 

If you no longer have the Operating Instructions these may be viewed/downloaded as a PDF file from the Panasonic Support website. This PDF file may be saved to your computer hard drive.

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Thanks. I recorded in FR as it was more than two hours. I usually record in SP if it is short enough.

 

I have to reset the clock about every week. Nothing seems to "reset" it but it is not terribly inconvenient. I have looked at the manual but I'll recheck the pages you mention. Thanks so much for your help. You are such a big help to all here. I appreciate your taking the time.

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  • 2 weeks later...

No later than 18 February 2009 all full-power U.S. broadcast stations will cease analog broadcasting. Most analog broadcast stations already have one or more digital channels and digital sub-channels in operation. The shutdown of analog broadcasting (for those receiving TV signals with an antenna) is the reason behind the taxpayer subsidized coupon program for government-approved converter boxes. Low power analog CA and LP broadcast stations may continue to broadcast analog signals after 18 February 2009 but they are also expected to transition to digital broadcasting within specific time frames that have been individually determined.

 

Cable will maintain some analog services, mainly passing-through local broadcast stations for customers through the end of 2012. The broadcast stations being passed through after 18 February 2009 are non-encoded digital and HD stations. ("Encoded" services are those that are "scrambled.") Much of cable service will be transitioning to digital in the near future but that will not have as severe an impact on viewers with digital cable boxes that convert digital signals to analog for those with analog TVs. Digital and High Definition cable boxes and Cable Cards remap and unscramble digital channels allowing one to watch HD programming on HD TVs. HD DVRs provided by a Cable service allow time-shifting to an internal hard drive but may prevent copying to DVD media.

 

Satellite is already a digital-only medium. Digital satellite receivers convert digital signals to analog for those with analog TVs. High Definition satellite receivers allow one to watch HD programming on HD TVs. HD DVRs provided by a Satellite service allow time-shifting to an internal hard drive but may prevent copying to DVD media.

 

High Definition is a sub-set of digital service. All High Definition is "digital," but not all "digital" is High Definition. There are no requirements for any broadcasters to provide High Definition service. Many broadcast stations are now offering one sub-channel in High Definition. Providing HD service is a market-based decision for broadcasters.

 

Cable and satellite services are offering various networks in High Definition. There are no requirements for any Cable or Satellite network to provide High Definition service. Providing HD is a market-based decision for Cable or Satellite service providers.

 

High Definition DVRs are designed to prevent the copying of HD programming, in that original quality, to external media (such as a DVD) to protect the rights of copyright holders. DVD recorders downconvert High Definition to Standard Definition for the same reason, preventing copyright infringement. Many wrongly assume that they have a "right" to copy the property of another. In certain circumstances the law provides for a "fair use" exemption from prosecution for those that copy the property of another for personal use.

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You seemed to have summed up the upcoming upheaval pretty good. The only thing that I might disagrees with is the last part about fair use and recording material. I have to argue that it was decided back when VCRs came out the consumer had a right to tape material for personal and archiving for personal use.

 

I give you about the vcr case:

http://eightiesclub.tripod.com/id408.htm

 

I would be more concerned about the idea that dvd players could be updated so they wouldn't play certain types of movies, that didn't have the right code embedded in them. see link;

 

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86396'>http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86396'>http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86396'>http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86396

 

It would seem to me that the fair use laws covering vcrs and dvd recorders such as mine should include pvrs and high definition dvd recorders.

 

I would be more concerned about the idea that dvd players could be updated so they wouldn't play certain types of movies, that didn't have the right code embedded in them. see link;

 

http://forum.digital-digest.com/showthread.php?t=86396

 

It would seem to me that the fair use laws covering vcrs and dvd recorders such as mine should include pvrs and high definition dvd recorders.

 

Message was edited by: kennethlawson

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Ken,

 

Recent advances in technology have brought forth legislation resulting in substantial change.

 

Two Acts signed into law by Bill Clinton, The "No Electronic Theft" Act (1997) and The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (1998), and the Regulations and Agency decisions that implement these Acts (under the Bush Administration) have and continue to bring forth many changes in the marketplace.

 

In earlier posts you have pointed out the realities of DRM. This has arisen due to technology that might allow reproduction of copyrighted material in the same quality as the original.

 

It doesn't matter if we like it or not. To quote Walter Cronkite "that's the way it is."

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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Sandy,

 

Time-shifting devices such as your DVD recorder should continue to function in the same way as they do now.

 

The situation might change if TCM or cable or satellite services implement copyright protection that may restrict or prevent home-recording. This is a very real concern.

 

Due to future uncertainties my suggestion is to record now all that you may want to have in your personal archive.

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From what I gather from the link from the HBO site that was posted,the only thing you can't record is On-Demand stuff, everything else you should be able to record, at least at this point. However I see frighting possibilities down the road, The new Blue Ray High definition dvd players are the newest target of hackers and they have made headway into hacking copy-protected DVDs , The point is even if your not into HD right now, with the" digital revolution " as everything goes digital tighter and tighter copy protection is sure to be added to new material, particularly HD stuff. I also see the possibility of equipment like DVR, or pvr as they're also known as being dumbed down and have more limited capabilities, Do a search for " AACS code" that is the code they use for copy protection on HD dvds, I'm sure it has many other uses and may be put into other types of equipment. eventually.

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Actually I don't think so. The essential issue is media company's be it Studios RIAA, Or MPAA trying to control what we can do with the media we get and what we can do with what dose come in through our pips, sat, cable,or HD DVD. I just read a article saying they want to extend drm to Ebooks..!!

http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/03/22/2150244&from=rss'>http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/03/22/2150244&from=rss'>http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/03/22/2150244&from=rss'>http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/03/22/2150244&from=rss

 

I think this just the tip of the iceberg...

 

http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/03/22/2150244&from=rss

 

I think this just the tip of the iceberg...

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