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Gremlin seeks DVDR advice


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Thanks, It seems to have become my main theme in the blog, I resent people telling how I can use something once I buy it be it a cd movie or a gun.. I'm thinking there may be a Part II to last nights article, I've thought of some other points that I didn't put in there, and I may write a second part to go with it if I can find the information I want. I'm not as up on this DRM thing as I'd like to be but I'm trying to voice anther opion from the consumers side. This is defiantly a passion of mine" Freedom of Use" Thanks for the voter of confidence..

 

Ken

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Your research and articles are helpful to us consumers. I?ve never sold or given away any DVD or tape I?ve made of movies that I?ve recorded off TV. Real hackers and pirate duplicators know how to get around this copy-protection stuff.

 

The music, TV, and movie industries are already vastly wealthy, and now they are trying to squeeze more bucks out of us for a per-use view or listen to their films and music. How much more greedy can they get?

 

DIGG:

http://digg.com/

 

DIGG SEARCH:

http://digg.com/search?section=all&s=aacs

 

http://digg.com/search?section=all&s=drm

 

LAWSON REPORT:

http://kenenthlawson.blogspot.com/

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Thanks, Being at home most of the time I guess I have too much time to think...LOL and do research about what I think about.....LOL

I don't think people understand what the bigger picture is,, if the media company's can control what and how e watch or tv and how we listen to our music, the are essentially controlling a population, and limiting our freedom of speech and rights to use our bought and paid for media s we want as long as its for our own personal use and not used to make money for ourselves or pirate it as they claim we all do...!!!

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I was thinking again, I thought up this scene, which is possible even with todays tech;

 

Image this; You sit down with your family in front of your brand new 50+" High definition tv with 7.1 Surround; sound and all the trimmings to watch a Blu-ray movie you borrowed from a friend. You played the movie in your brand new Blu-ray HD DVD player the hooked up to the Internet via your wireless connection which for your wi-fi network for the computers. This give you extra features not on the player itself,,, or so you thought.

 

A week latter you receive a summons to the Piracy Court in your area, Apparently the movie your borrowed from your friend was a copy and not the original, and the DVD player realized this and played it anyways and then "phoned Home"

 

 

 

A week latter you receive a summons to the Piracy Court in your area, Apparently the movie your borrowed from your friend was a copy and not the original, and the DVD player realized this and played it anyways and then "phoned Home"

Scary isn't it?

 

Message was edited by: kennethlawson

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Disconnect your telephone modem, or turn off your DSL box, or unplug your cable.

 

When I first subscribed to satellite, the original company requried that I have my phone line plugged into the sat box. When the installer left, I unplugged my phone from the box.

 

For the next several weeks I received several "dead" calls every day. My phone would ring but when I answered, all I heard was dead air. Do de do do (Tzone music). My Sat company was calling my sat box to see what I was up to. (How do we know these sat boxes don't have little cameras in them, aimed at us?)

 

So I called my phone company, they put a track on the calls, I had to keep a log of when the calls came in, and about three weeks later the phone calls stopped.

 

At first the phone company didn't want to bother with this. They suggested I change my phone number. I told them I'd call the FCC and see what they had to say about it. Then the phone lady all of a sudden took interest in my plight.

 

When I later switched over to Direct TV, I unplugged my phone line to their box, but I never received any check-up calls.

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An older relative of mine bought a new car a couple of years ago. She was trying to find the button to turn on her light flashers. She saw a button on the rear view mirror, so she pressed it. The voice of a nice young man came over her radio speaker and said, "Hello, may I help you?"

 

Seems her new car had a free 90 days of prime-star, or find-you-star, or some emergency cell phone service. When she pressed the button, some guy in Denver answered the hot-line.

 

Two old ladies almost died in Albuquerque last year. They parked their car in a mall parking lot, and they turned off the engine and took out the key. Then they couldn't figure out how to unlock the door locks. They were too weak to kick out the windows. They were stuck in the electronic car for more than two hours in the summer sun. The windows were tinted so they couldn't wave at anyone. One of them finally wrote a note on a piece of paper and pressed it up againt a side window. The guy in the next parking space saw it and it read something like "Help, Call Police". He called the police and they broke out a window and saved the two ladies.

 

Beware of electronics.

 

I've been trying to find a new small pick-up that is all manual. Seems they don't make them anymore. All "small" pick-ups are now large, and all "large" pick-ups are now giant. And all are electronic.

 

Word is going around out where I live that says the highway patrol can track a speeder by typing their tag number into their patrol car computer. A map of the area is supposed to show up on their computer showing where the vehicle with that tag number is traveling. I don't know if that's true or not, but it's quite a rumor out here.

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  • 1 month later...

Here is advice concerning Panasonic DVD drives that seem to be failing but just need a spindle/hub cleaning:

 

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=210507

 

Following these detailed instructions clean the lens, rubber and plastic spindle parts and hub area, and the circular guide in the DVD drive lid.

 

Panasonic 2006 and newer DVD drives are easy to service. Remove the case top cover to get access to the DVD drive. Remove the four small Phillips screws and lift the DVD drive top lid. When viewing the DVD drive from the front (where the tray rolls out) notice the roller assembly at the rear of the DVD tray. This mechanism must be positioned to the left corner before reassembly so these parts will be correctly aligned to the guide rail on the underside of the drive lid. With the Panasonic 2006 and newer models opening of the case, removing the DVD drive lid, cleaning the drive, closing the drive lid, and closing the case takes around fifteen minutes.

 

With Panasonic 2005 or older models the case top cover and the front panel assembly may need to be removed in order to give clearance for the DVD drive lid to be lifted somewhat at the front, slid forward, allowing the rear to disengage, following which the lid may be lifted off. When viewing the DVD drive from the front (where the tray rolls out) notice the roller assembly at the rear of the DVD tray. This mechanism must be positioned to the left corner before reassembly so these parts will be correctly aligned to the guide rail on the underside of the drive lid. Allow around 35 minutes for opening the case, removal of the front panel after removing the top center anchor screw (if present), loosening the snap clips at the top, sides and press to release tabs along the bottom; removing the DVD drive lid, cleaning and reassembly.

 

Note: On a combo recorder take care to hold the VHS door open as the front panel is fitted back to the case. This will assure the correct alignment of the VHS door lifting mechanism.

 

These proceedures may be somewhat different with older Panasonics and other brands of DVD recorders and combo recorders. I have a 2003 Panasonic DVD-S35 DVD player. To clean the hub/spindle area on that product's DVD drive one needs to use a long stemmed cotton swab to reach the hub/spindle from the opening at the front of the drive as the drive's top cover may not be removed.

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  • 1 month later...

I have begun my copying of vhs recordings onto dvd-r in earnest! But I have a question. Is it possible for me to watch my cable tv during the process? Must I actually watch everything that is being copied without being able to switch to TV or is there something I can do to let me view cable programming?

 

Thank you!

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The answer depends on a number of factors. The main considerations are the model of DVD Recorder or combo recorder you use and the way you have it interconnected with other equipment and your TV. The answer hinges on whether your DVD recorder is providing your TV with its cable signal through the cable coax or is providing a signal through another input on your TV.

 

If your DVD recorder receives its TCM signal from the cable box (or, say a satellite reciever) through inputs with yellow, white and red cables (termed "composite" cables) and/or through a S-Video cable, and outputs its signal to your TV with those same type of "output" cables, or red, green and blue cables (termed "component" cables) and/or a HDMI cable, the answer is that you may be able watch other programming while you are copying videotaped recordings to DVD. In this instance it is a matter of switching inputs on your TV remote control.

 

If your DVD recorder receives its TCM signal from the cable box (or, again, a satellite receiver) through the threaded RF coax "in" connector and outputs its signal to your TV through the threaded RF coax "out" connector you may not be able to watch other programming while you are copying videotaped recordings to DVD. In this instance your DVD recorder is directly in the tuning path and might not be switched out of that path for independent operation such as copying videotaped recordings to DVD and watching cable at the same time.

 

If you have your DVD recorder connected to your TV through the RF coax you may wish to add a second output to your TV, either composite for video and audio or component for video and white/red for audio, (or some other connection) if your TV has such inputs, and then use your TV remote to switch between the inputs for setting up your videotape copying and then switch back to the RF input to watch cable.

 

This message was revised for clarity by TalkieTime

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MissGoddess,

 

My earlier response to your question went through several revisions in an effort to make the information less complicated. In one version I mentioned modulated and unmodulated RF outputs (the threaded fittings) but later I removed that information. After pondering my earlier response I must add this explanation as further clarification:

 

Most, if not all DVD combo recorders have a modulated RF output. This means that whatever signal is fed to the combo recorder's RF input is passed through to the RF output unless the machine is playing a DVD or copying a videotaped recording to DVD, in which case that signal overrides the RF input signal from your cable box. In this case you will not be able to watch cable while copying a videotaped recording to DVD. The program being played or recorded will be the one present on the combo recorder outputs. The workaround is to insert a RF A/B switch (around $6) between the cable box and DVD combo recorder. One feed should go to the DVD combo recorder and the other feed should go to your TV's RF input. The A/B switch selects between these feeds and will allow the cable signal to be passed through to the TV. The TV remote will select between the input signal sources allowing you to watch cable while the machine is recording a DVD.

 

Most recent model DVD recorders (without VHS sections) have unmodulated RF outputs. This means that whatever signal is fed to the DVD recorder's RF input is passed through to its RF output. If the machine is playing or recording a DVD that signal is output only through the composite jacks (yellow, red and white), the component jacks (red, green and blue), S-Video jack, or HDMI jack (if present). Those outputs carry only the playing/recording output and the RF output continues to pass through whatever signal is fed to the DVD recorder's RF input, thus allowing the TV remote to select between the signal sources allowing you to watch cable while the machine is recording from another input fed from an external VCR.

 

I regret that my earlier post was incomplete and somewhat misleading.

 

As with my earlier post this message was revised for clarity by TalkieTime

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Hi again, TT: Fortunately, my dvd recorder is apparently one of the newer ones that allows

me to watch cable while making copies from vhs to dvd. It would be quite a nuisance

otherwise, since I have so many tapes to convert and don't really feel like watching them

all. I'm already pleased with the space I am saving by getting rid of bulky vhs tapes.

 

Thank you again for your instructions.

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  • 1 month later...

It appears this is the correct place for this question.

 

I am new to digital television and fairly new to a DVD player. Based on the comments here, I bought a Panasonic player/recorder that allows transferring of tape to dvd.

 

However, since I had digital cable installed, I am unable to get the DVD player to work. I tried to play a commercial DVD -- there is audio but no picture.

 

I called the tech support and he said he was not able to help.

 

He walked me through the hookups and said they appear to be correct.

 

If the answer is somewhere below, just point me to that post.

 

Thank you for your time.

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Unfortunately, it almost impossible to diagnosis problems like this without actually seeing them.

 

The first thing I think I would ask or check is what connections you actually have on your tv, and how your cable box is connected to it. Also what connections are on the back of the DVD recorder player, Also, do you have a surround sound system added to the mix? If so, what connections are being used and are free yet?

At this point I wouldn't worry too much about getting HD or digital signal into the dvd recorder.

 

You should be able to come off the back of the cable box with a set of RCA cable, Red Yellow, White, the heavier the cables the better, try not to use the cheap ones that come with units, get a nice heavy set, they are better insulated and carry a bit better signal ,If you have a free S-video output on the back of the cable box use that instead of the video lead in the RCA set . That should get a signal into the DVD recorder, as for getting the signal out . There are a couple of of ways to do it, the easiest is to do what I use, a signal switch box that lets you switch the input to the tv. You hook the output from both the cable box, and the DVD player/recorder to two sets of inputs on the back of the switch, and out from the switch to the tv. if this is as clear as mud, free free to email me and I'll try to clarify.

Ken

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Oh gad!! The worst possible thing that could happen at the worst possible time has happened: a dvd-r disc is stuck in my *Panasonic DVD-R* and I can't do a thing with it. It's constantly "re-setting" itself and won't let me operate it at all. I called their customer service and of course they said I have to send it in. Is there anyone who knows a way to avoid that? I've heard you can sometimes open up the machine and remove the disc yourself---I'm willing to try it because I have been waiting all summer to record the Spencer Tracy movies coming on tomorrow morning and for the Kay Francis films coming up this week. If anyone knows what to do with this thing (besides chucking it out the window) please let me know. :(:(:(

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You can try unplugging the machine for about 5 minutes.

 

Then plug it in and try to eject the disk.

 

Sometimes the complex computer chips inside the machines get their programs messed up and a good un-plug can help reset them.

 

I have to do that a few times a year with my DVD machine.

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Thanks, Fred, I did that too with no results. I went ahead and opened her up and took out the disc. now it's just sort of "resetting" itself, I guess, over and over for about the past three or four minutes. I expect I really messed it up and will have to send it off to Panasonic's "hospital".

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>It appears this is the correct place for this question.

 

>I am new to digital television and fairly new to a DVD player. Based on the comments here, I bought a Panasonic player/recorder that allows transferring of tape to dvd.

 

>However, since I had digital cable installed, I am unable to get the DVD player to work. I tried to play a commercial DVD -- there is audio but no picture.

 

 

These new machines can be a little tricky.

 

Try playing a different disk and see if you have the same problem.

 

Try playing a tape to see if you can get the tape?s picture on the TV.

 

Sounds like you?ve got the audio cables correct where they go from your DVD to your TV, but you might not have your video cable in the right place.

 

I have an older Panasonic VHS/DVD unit, and in the back of it, it has two different outputs, one for the tape player and one for the DVD player, but it also has a ?combined? output where one set of cables work to playback both tape and DVD.

 

The separate tape and DVD outputs are supposed to produce a higher quality image, but I just use the single set of cables and the ?combined? output.

 

Sounds like your problem is with the connections. Maybe you can play around with different output/input connections and try different combinations. Sometimes I have to do that.

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Have you ever cleaned your DVD lens?

 

I had a problem with my Panasonic refusing to make dubs from tape to DVD, and claiming that I was using a wrong disk in the machine. This went on for a month or so.

 

I finally remembered reading something about cleaning the laser lens, so I bought a lens cleaning disk. That cleared up the problem.

 

The DVD uses a tiny laser to record and playback images. The laser has a tiny lens on it. If it gets a little dust on it, it can't properly read a disk. The information recorded on a disk is very small, very narrow.

 

A lens cleaning disk is a regular disk with a tiny little brush glued to the bottom of the disk. Insert the disk into the machine, and as the disk turns, it brushes off the lens.

 

My Panasonic stopped working with +R disks after about a year. I sent it to Panasonic and they could not fix it. They told me to go to -R disks, so I did. It has worked with -R disks for about three years.

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Hi Fred,

 

I did read on some troubleshooting website about how you should "clean your lens". If the darn thing ever stops "recovering" maybe I will do that as a precaution. However, it's still doing the same thing, heaven knows how long it will take. Right now, a glass of bubbly is the only solution for my own frazzled wires.

 

Thank you for the advice. I am beginning to wonder after reading several complaints at Amazon about this device whether I bought the wrong one.

 

If all else fails, I run out and try to find a VCR (or VCR/DVD combo) to record my movies. What else can I do?

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Thank you Fred and Kenneth.

 

Sad to say, it was so simple as to be embarrassing. Interesting that the tech didn't think to go through it with me though.

 

Here is how I have to configure the television and DVD recorder in order to view both:

 

--television on channel three to view television only;

 

--television and DVD player/recorder on channel four to view DVDs and use onscreen scheduling.

 

Truly a senior moment!

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