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Gremlin seeks DVDR advice


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>Don't you mean your TV/Video button?

 

No. The TV/Video button on my remote is for the remote control of the TV, but my TV does not respond to a remote ... it's 20 years old. The VCR/TV button on my remote is to switch between modes - say I want to record something, but watch something on channel 2-13 at the same time (I told you, the set is old). It probably serves the same function as the TV/Video button, but that particular button has no function in this case.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Here is a PSA with some simple Digital TV transition advice for those receiving TV with an antenna:

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTSS8E7bKXg&fmt=18

 

This link is not active in this post so copy the address in your browser. It's worth the trouble to view it.

 

This post in another Forum has an active link to the PSA:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=14785173#post14785173

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That's the most confusing PSA I've ever seen.

 

People who receive a lot of antenna stations now, need only buy a new TV that has both analog and digital tuners, or they can later buy one of these from walmart:

 

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=8343230

 

These cost about $49 at Walmart.

 

The antenna wire plugs into the back of this box, just as it does on an old TV, and then a short cable plugs into the back of this box, and the other end plugs into the back of an old TV.

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If you place your cursor on the second small photo here, you will see the back of the converter box:

 

http://reviews.cnet.com/tv-hdtv-tuners-receivers/rca-dta800/4505-6487_7-32887593.html

 

On the far left are two RF connectors. The left one is for the Antenna wire IN FROM ANTENNA, and the right one is for the Antenna wire OUT TO TV.

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The PSA is a view of reality for many elderly folks rather than the simplistic information presented in PSAs seen constantly on broadcast TV.

 

There is a great deal of discussion on the AVS Forum concerning the DTV transition and the digital to analog converter boxes for antenna reception:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=186

 

In that Coupon Eligible Converter Box (CECB) sub-forum there are hundreds of threads with tens of thousands of posts with millions of views.

 

The converter boxes most highly regarded by their owners are the Zenith DTT901 ($49.99 at KMart and BiMart and a few other chain stores, or $59.99 at Circuit City): the Insignia NS-DXA1-APT (a Zenith DTT901 clone, $59.99 at Best Buy); the Channel Master CM-7000 (about $80) and Zinwell ZAT-970A (around $50) are found at various online stores. The RCA, found at some WalMart stores, has a remote with very large buttons. The Magnavox (and its Philco twin) found at some WalMart and KMart stores and the DTVPal/TR-40 (Sears, KMart and Dish Network) are less well regarded by owners. The government coupons reduce these prices by $40 per converter box.

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>The PSA is a view of reality for many elderly folks

 

Everyone already knows that. We don't need a Saturday Night Live skit. The PSA was not informative. It was a comedy act with an old person.

 

What everyone needs to know is that the CONVERTER BOX costs around $49 to $59, and it's available at stores like WalMart.

 

The Antenna wire plugs into the back of the converter box.

 

The converter box plugs into the back of a person's TV.

 

That's it, and that's what should be shown in any PSA. This can be shown in 10 seconds.

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Begining on March 1 2007 all products with tuners manufactured for sale in the USA have been required by law to have a digital tuner. Current tuner-equipped products have digital and analog tuners. Analog tuners will still be found in products made for the US/Canadian market for a few more years. Once Canada transitions to digital broadcasting expect to see the demise of analog tuners.

 

The way around the law for many manufacturers of VCRs and DVD recorders was to build "tunerless" products. These products do not have the threaded RF in and out jacks. These products do have the composite RCA input and output jacks, yellow for video and white/red for audio. If these products are capable of recording then they will record from these "line in" jacks. Many DVD recorders and combo recorders also have some other input and output options, component (Red/Blue/Green), S-Video or HDMI.

 

Cable and satellite boxes convert digital signals into an analog format. These analog signals may be recorded through the RCA inputs on tunerless recording devices. Some current combo recorders have both digital and analog tuners and VHS and DVD recording capability. But the VHS section may not record digital signals to videotape since this would require a separate (and expensive) decoder. Since VHS is "old" technology, product manufacturers do not include such expensive features that will not be used widely. If recording from the digital tuner itself (where digital channels may have decimal points in the channel numbers) recording is limited to DVD. This should be of little consequence for those using cable boxes, satellite receivers or coupon eligible converter boxes (CECBs) for antenna reception.

 

When recording from digital sources "Copy Protection" of copyrighted material will be an ever-present concern. Choose the brands/models that are the least sensitive to copy protection.

 

Currently I own fifteen functional Panasonic DVD recorders and combo recorders and one Philips DVDR3575H/37B Hard Drive/DVD recorder. In recent years "Diga" is the name Panasonic uses to identify their line of DVD recorders. Since I am a genuine Panasonic "fanatic" I am known as "DigaDo" on the AVS Forum where one may find discussions among thousands of DVD recorder/combo recorder owners/users:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=106

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So let's say I buy a combo with a digital tuner, and the DVR records in digital format, the VCR in analog format. (I think that's what the model I'm looking at does.) Now suppose I record something on DVD. Can it still be copied onto a VHS tape using the built-in VCR, or do I lose that capability?

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Since a DVD recording has already been "decoded" as part of the recording process it should need no further decoding when copied to VHS. I'm just speculating here. I'm sure the question may be, or has been answered on the AVS Forum.

 

On a combo recorder the DVD records digital or analog programming.

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  • 1 month later...

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=106

 

What an excellent site, thank you talkietime.

 

A question? If I've missed the info, just point me to a post.

 

I am very happy with my Panasonic DMR-ES35V (talkietime recommended it), and am looking to get another one. Is there another model that has the same features (I need DVD and VHS in the same machine) in a newer machine?

 

I've only found the Sony RDR-VXD655 VHS DVD Recorder Combo, but wanted to check with you before I buy another machine.

 

Thank you in advance.

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Primosprimos,

 

The DMR-EZ48 is the current (2008) combo recorder in the Panasonic line. This and the DMR-EZ28 DVD recorder have digital and analog tuners, HDMI, upscaling and a number of other features. The 2008 models seem to have fewer problems than Panasonic?s 2007 models (that have a ?7? in the model names). For normal recording either of these models might be satisfactory for your use. Panasonics tend to be overpriced when purchased new. Missing from the DMR-EZ48 are essential menu-initiated copying features that allow the user to customize settings for Time Limited and Flexible Copying. The lack of these features in 2007 and 2008 combo recorders and limitations imposed by the front panel copying method makes these models somewhat ?user unfriendly.? With current model combo recorders there is very little advantage to a single machine with a VHS and DVD drive. A more flexible alternative is found with an external VCR connected to a DVD recorder or HDD/DVD recorder.

 

The 2006 DMR-ES35V is an outstanding videotape copying ?workhorse.? If dubbing/copying is important to you I would suggest reserving the DMR-ES35V for that use. Three of my five DMR-ES35V models and two of my similar 2005 DMR-ES30V models have accumulated more than 3,000 recording hours per machine?perhaps most of those recording hours accumulated during my extensive selective dubbing project, see this post:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=13955310#post13955310

 

With heavy use it is important to clean the DVD drive hub/spindle/lens and related parts especially in dusty or smoking environments or where DVDs are handled with a finger through the center hole. See this and the following posts for advice and photos:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=14479898#post14479898

 

I currently own sixteen functional Panasonics from the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 model years; one 2007 Philips 3575 HDD/DVD recorder; and a new 2008/2009 Magnavox H2160 HDD/DVD recorder arrived on Wednesday. All but two of my 2005 and 2006 Panasonics are currently set aside for standby service. Four 2007 DMR-EZ17 models are in current use, two of which are enslaved to a Comcast Motorola DTC700 digital cable box always tuned to TCM. One 2008 DMR-EZ28 model and the Philips 3575 HDD/DVD recorder are also dedicated to time-shifting from TCM. With the Panasonics I use a tandem recording strategy for TCM. I have settled upon the Panasonic LP speed (four hours per DVD) and often FR (at near or better than LP quality) for the last recording on a DVD. The 2007 and 2008 EZ series Panasonics require certain workarounds and occasional resets to keep them functional. (My favorite older Panasonics did not need such measures.) With the Philips I do not record at speeds below SPP or LP (2.5 to three hours per disc when dubbed to DVD). The new Magnavox H2160 HDD/DVD recorder is largely a Philips 3575/3576 clone. Once the Magnavox has been set up it will also be dedicated to time-shifting from TCM. There is much more flexibility, even with ?round the clock recording capability, with Philips and Magnavox hard drive models. These models are discussed in great detail on the AVS Forum. The Magnavox is currently bargain priced at $239.98 (plus $4.97 shipping to my home, and I opted for the three year extension of the warranty for $28.99); see the AVS Forum sticky thread for more information:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=940657

 

As to the Sony I would suggest looking for owner/user comments on the AVS Forum.

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=106

 

Message was edited by: talkietime

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I have a new VHS/DVD Recorder, and about the only movie sight I can record from is TCM, Lifetime TV and the local channels. (AMC will not let me), I cannot record movies from TBS or TNT, and as somebody has stated; I resent having bought a recorder, and now I cannot record on it. I realize I cannot record from "On Demand" but I cannot record from any pay channel, and those listed previously. Wasn't all this resolved a few years after the recorders came out. And Yes, the people that know how, will record. I have a friend that rents from Netflix, and uses a software program to record EVERY movie through his computer. And I CANNOT record from my TV .

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TrissyCat,

 

In my October 4 2008 post I cautioned "When recording from digital sources 'Copy Protection' of copyrighted material will be an ever-present concern. Choose the brands/models that are the least sensitive to copy protection."

 

Recent discussions on the AVS Forum indicate that "Copy Protection" is now being embeded in some commercials due to copyrighted musical selections found in those commercials. When the "CP flag" is detected by a tuner the device may prevent the recording of the commercial as well as the program where the commercial has been inserted.

 

There are other AVS Forum discussions of original programming that contain the "CP flag" or certain networks that are implementing "CP" in a more widespread manner.

 

In the last dozen years the laws have changed in ways that allow restrictions to, or prevention of the recording of copyrighted material. With the implementation of digital transmission and reception technology the recording of copyrighted content will become more restrictive as time goes by.

 

Yes, there is computer software, and "video stabilizers" that bypass some copyright restrictions when used with recording or copying devices. These are also discussed on the AVS Forum.

 

Most DVD recorder User Manuals have CP disclaimers prominently displayed. Some DVD recorders, especially Sony and JVC products, are so sensitive to a real or perceived "CP flag" that many users are returning the DVD recorders as "defective" since they are unable to record much of anything. This is contributing to the demise of DVD recorders.

 

Cable and satellite providers have DVRs that will record HD or SD programming but these devices may not allow copying of these recordings to removable media (DVDs). DVRs are also contributing to the demise of DVD recorders.

 

Some manufacturers are abandoning the DVD recorder market. Their reasoning: Why build a DVD recorder that doesn't record? Why build a DVD recorder that may work but the DVD recorder manufacturer may become a party to a copyright infringement lawsuit if their product works too well?

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TrissyCat,

 

Most sellers have a customer satisfaction period where a product may be exchanged for another if it does not please the customer or it does not work as it should. If you are within that period you may want to consider exchanging your DVD recorder for another product.

 

Before exchanging the DVD recorder find out what other DVD recorders are sold by that store. Then read "Customer Reviews" for those products on such websites as Amazon, Best Buy, Circuit City, etc. The most informative discussions may be found between other owners posting on the AVS Forum. Use that information to make an informed decision and exchange your DVD recorder for one that is more likely to give you good service. Some stores (WalMart) may refund your money if you are not satisfied.

 

The AVS Forum DVD recorder discussions may be found here:

 

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=106

 

If you search the AVS Forum for a particular model but have no result you may have to set the search criteria to go back several months. I believe the default search criteria is something like thirty days. There are something like 670,000 AVS Forum members and many millions of posts so most anything may be found with the right search criteria.

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On a different note; How many folks are using LCD tvs now? and what ones are handling the Stranded Def material best?

As I am in the market for a new tv, LCD will be what I'm going with, and I won't be able to go to HD for quite some time. I am interested in finding a LCD that handles SD material best, with a eye for future uses as I can upgrade and add to etc.

Ken

 

Message was edited by: kennethlawson

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The DMR-EZ48 is the current (2008) combo recorder in the Panasonic line.

 

Thank you, once again, talkietime. I've ordered it. I am simple (very) in my requirements, taping the occasional television show to VHS tape (haven't tried taping to dvds yet and I don't do DVRing), playing tapes, and playing dvds.

 

The 2006 DMR-ES35V is an outstanding videotape copying ?workhorse.?

 

That's my impression of it. On your recommendation, I will reserve it for when I finally get around to copying my numerousVHS tapes. On -R dvds, per your instruction!

 

It is comforting to know you are here and at the AVS forum.

 

Thanks again.

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I've been using a Sony DVD/VCR recorder for almost a year now and it has met or exceeded all expectations once I got it set up. The manual said it couldn't be used without a cable box, which I don't have and don't want. After initial panic, I figured my old VCR/DVD player combo has a tuner and hooked it up as if it were a cable box. This method is better than anything suggested in the manual, as it offers much versatility in recording back and forth from each machine. Each time you "stop" a recording, a new title is created unless "pause" is utilized. It is very clumsy doing precise dubbing in the "dub" mode on a dual deck, if not impossible. A second deck is a necessity for our purposes.

 

God bless TCM. I've never had problems recording any of their programs. The movies I really wanted off FOX were OK, thankfully, but even if they record on tape, you can never tell whether other channels' stuff will turn out on DVDs. I tried SON OF FRANKENSTEIN from AMC and my tape wouldn't transfer to disc. I remain a staunch believer in keeping and blending both VHS and DVD technologies. But then, I still play 78s on my record player.

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