Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

The Day The Earth Stood Still Remake


Recommended Posts

I saw somewhere (or possibly read) that sometime in 2008 the remake of The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951) will be out in theaters.

 

Now, my question is this: In today's world state of affairs, would Klatu's message to the people of Earth be as relevant as in the original version? And secondly, what response from the nations of the Earth do you think would be given?

 

Frankly I think we'd be reduced to a "Burned out cinder" ( as Klatu would put it) right off the bat. Especially with what's going on around the world today. Let me know what you think.

 

Bill

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll bet the film with have a lot of car chases, big explosions, lots of booming noise on the sound track, and lots of fast cutting. It will be irritating and nerve wracking, rather than intellectual.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> Why don't they just re-release the original and show

> it again in theaters?

 

As much as you and I and others like us would love that, the plain fact is the general movie going audience wouldn't give a damn about a 1950s sci-fi movie in GASP! eeeevil Black and White.

 

Anyways I could see a scene near the end of the film where Klatu talks at the podium of the UN. Other then that it'll have lots of military action, some "aliens among us/seeding humanity" subplots and a nuclear war averted just in the nick of time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll probably see it when it's released on DVD, however nothing in my mind will be as good as the original. Special effects will be better of course, but not the plot or the message. The message I'm afraid will get lost in all the hoopla.

 

Bill

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you ever noticed how much the basic story is like the story of Jesus in the Bible?

 

Klatu comes to earth from the heavens.

 

He tries to warn mankind about their big sins, their foolishness, and their folly. He warns that the whole earth will be destroyed if the earth people don't listen to him.

 

He's captured by the authorities. He's killed by the authorities. His robot friend raises him from the dead, then he leaves and goes back up into the sky.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dobbsy -- I believe the screenwriter (Edmund H. North) and/or the storywriter (Harry Bates) for The Day the Earth Stood Still were presenting a Christian allegory. Robert Wise mentioned on the DVD that he was unaware of the allegory. He liked the story because of it's anti-war message.

 

One of the biggest Christ tip-offs for me was Klaatu's earthly name of "Carpenter."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now Gort the robot (and please stay with me on this one) is the Holy Spirit. I was taught to believe that the Holy Spirit is nothing more than the manifestation of God's power primarily there as a helper when things got tough.

 

Bill

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're welcome. I just wanted to let you know that you're thinking was correct.

 

Sci-Fi sure found it's footing in the 50s because of the threat of Communism. Some of the films presented the Red Scare as the evil within and some films showed the effects of paranoia. It really made the Sci-Fi genre quite fascinating. I say this as someone who wasn't close to being born at that time, though.

 

I've got two words for the remake of The Day the Earth Stood Still: Bernard Herrmann. I'm not sure Herrmann's masterful score can be duplicated, and even if it is, it would probably sound cheesy to today's filmgoer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why don't they just re-release the original and show it again in theaters?

 

You have read my mind!!!! Every time I see a remake advertised I say that same thing, quite loudly, to my tv. That's one of my fave 50s sci-fi films and there's no way it will be anywhere as good b/c like someone else already posted, they will probably dumb down the story and turn it into nothing more than 2 hours of CGI effects and lots of noisy explosions and other nonsense. Look at the recent remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers (actually the 2nd remake of this film). It cost around $100 million to make and on it's opening weekend it only made $6 million.

 

I would definitely go see these films if there were simply re-released but I'm not paying down good money to see sub-par remakes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not surprised they are remaking "Day the Earth Stood Still." About 15 years ago, I heard the science fiction author Harlan Ellison talk about how he had been approached to write a remake of DTESS. He refused and then found out that Ray Bradbury had been asked before he had been asked, and Bradbury had refused.

 

One of them, Ellison or Bradbury, suggested that they would be happy to write a sequel, when Klaa'tu returns to earth, but the studio wanted a remake or nothing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That reminds me of how Invasion of the Body Snatchers was an allegory about communism.

 

Except that it's not: it's an allegory about the evils of mass-conformity in the ultra-conservative 1950s.

 

 

Dobbsy -- I believe the screenwriter (Edmund H. North) and/or the storywriter (Harry Bates) for The Day the Earth Stood Still were presenting a Christian allegory. Robert Wise mentioned on the DVD that he was unaware of the allegory. He liked the story because of its anti-war message.

 

One of the biggest Christ tip-offs for me was Klaatu's earthly name of "Carpenter."

 

THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL isn't a Christian allegory, it's a Christ-allegory, which isn't the same thing. Just peel away the science fiction elements, and the contemporary setting, and you have:

 

A seeingly perfect man appears on Earth to warn its inhabitants of impending, heaven-sent retribution for their immoral and irresponsible behavior. To get to know them better, he wanders among them in mufti, disguised as a man called "Carpenter."

 

He's repaid for his efforts by being slain by a group of soldiers, only to rise from the dead to deliver a last benediction before ascending into the sky (heaven).

 

Sound familiar?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jesus Christ! You know today's moguls. They don't know who Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal are. They think the pulic won't really know 'em either. They feel they won't make money if they don't put a recognizable star in the film. Too bad. Could give these classics and celebrities a second life. Or would the public say: "I don't want to pay $11.00 to see a movie I can rent on Netflix."

 

John Q. Public. Ya can't go wrong listening to him.

 

Oh...Jesus Christ wasn't being blasphemous, but the answer to a question below.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> "Why don't they just re-release the original and show

> it again in theaters?".....

>

> I AGREE!!

 

 

When I was a kid, watching movies in theaters in the late '40s and all through the '50s, they often showed re-releases, especially in the smaller independent theaters, which, back then, were larger than the small CINEMA 8 and CINEMA 12 mall theaters of today.

 

I loved them. I saw King Kong on the big screen in 1952. I saw Gone With The Wind in full Technicolor and original format in the theater in 1953. I saw Captains Courageous, and many other great films of the '30s and '40s, plus many silent films too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...