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September Schedule is Up-- Jennifer Jones SOTM


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Several years earlier, Cary Grant's Mr. Blandings was pulling down $12,000 a year, for what that's worth.

 

 

WOW. Greg was short changed.......

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FYI.If Jennifer Jones' month includes THE SONG OF BERNADETTE, Darnell has an unbilled cameo as the Virgin Mary.

 

 

Yes, I'd forgotten about that. Thanks for reminding me.

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We Were Strangers, though not altogether successful, is a very interesting film, one of the few American movies to consider what being in a small group of revolutionaries would be like. The setting is Cuba, and the film was made more than a decade before Castro overthrew the Batista regime. John Garfield's character is never identified as a Communist, though that seems to be implied; he's that figure we used to hear about the 50s and 60s, an "outside agitator."

 

The film confronts the kinds of moral dilemmas faced by a revolutionary cell. The right wing papers found the film much too leftist, and the Communist critics liked it just as little as the right wingers.

 

Gilbert Roland has a sympathetic role as one of the revolutionary group; I'd put it alongside The Furies as some of his best work.

 

 

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:) I haven't looked at the whole schedule yet, but it appears that TCM has picked up the brand new LOC restoration of Douglas Fairbanks THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1921) which debuts on the 10th. Just released on DVD and Blu-ray a few months ago. As far as I'm aware this film has never aired on TCM before. So a premiere across the board. 

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We Were Strangers, though not altogether successful, is a very interesting film, one of the few American movies to consider what being in a small group of revolutionaries would be like. The setting is Cuba, and the film was made more than a decade before Castro overthrew the Batista regime. John Garfield's character is never identified as a Communist, though that seems to be implied; he's that figure we used to hear about the 50s and 60s, an "outside agitator."

 

The film confronts the kinds of moral dilemmas faced by a revolutionary cell. The right wing papers found the film much too leftist, and the Communist critics liked it just as little as the right wingers.

 

Gilbert Roland has a sympathetic role as one of the revolutionary group; I'd put it alongside The Furies as some of his best work.

 

 

Yes, a very unusual film for Hollywood at the time. I think Jennifer is very good in it. Well, every one is! Didn't John Huston direct it?

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Good stuff:

 

Demon Seed   ***1/2

Cesar   ***1/2

Golden Boy   ***

The Blot   ***

Stroszek   ***

Valley of the Sun   ***

Night On Earth   ***

The Dresser   ***1/2

Blood and Sand   ***

Start Cheering   ***

Blackbeard's Ghost   ***

Freaky Friday   ***

Candleshoe   ***

Alice's Restaurant   ***

Good Morning, Miss Dove   ***

Monterey Pop   ***1/2

Don't Look Back   ***1/2

 

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Yes, one for Directing and one for writing. I had forgotten about the latter award.

 

I thought I remembered seeing photos of Huston holding two awards while standing next to his father, who had one.

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Has anyone ever read if Jennifer mentioned in an interview or elsewhere which of her films was her favorite?

 

I dont recall any. Jennifer gave very few interviews over the years. A very private person. Would be interesting to know.

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Has anyone ever read if Jennifer mentioned in an interview or elsewhere which of her films was her favorite?

 

Her favorite leading man was said to be Joseph Cotten, with whom she co-starred in the films "Since You Went Away" (1944), "Love Letters" (1945), "Duel in the Sun" (1946) and "Portrait of Jennie" (1948). Maybe it's one of those.

 

Then again, I read a bizarre story that Jones tried to do away with herself after hearing about the death of Charles Bickford in 1967. He was her co-star in "The Song of Bernadette," so perhaps that film meant the most to her for more reasons than one. He was in "Duel in the Sun," too.

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Her favorite leading man was said to be Joseph Cotten, with whom she co-starred in the films "Since You Went Away" (1944), "Love Letters" (1945), "Duel in the Sun" (1946) and "Portrait of Jennie" (1948). Maybe it's one of those.

 

Then again, I read a bizarre story that Jones tried to do away with herself after hearing about the death of Charles Bickford in 1967. He was her co-star in "The Song of Bernadette," so perhaps that film meant the most to her for more reasons than one. He was in "Duel in the Sun," too.

 

 

Yes, I heard as well her suicide attempt occurred shortly after the death of Bickford. I believe they were close friends. They found her lying on the beach after taking an overdose of sleeping pills. (this was sometime in the 60s after Selznick's death). She was in freefall there for awhile but managed to pull herself together and resumed her life and remarried (Norton Simon until his death).

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Yes, I heard as well her suicide attempt occurred shortly after the death of Bickford. I believe they were close friends. They found her lying on the beach after taking an overdose of sleeping pills. (this was sometime in the 60s after Selznick's death). She was in freefall there for awhile but managed to pull herself together and resumed her life and remarried (Norton Simon until his death).

 

The Norton Simon museum is about 40 miles from where I live and is a very nice place to visit.    Something else I thank Jones for.

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I didnt know that. But I dont remember the artwork!

 

I wonder what's become of the Portrait of Jennie??? It hung in Jennifer's bedroom for years, but she gave it to her make-up man, George Masters, in thanks for all his work for her over the years, telling him she never liked the painting that much. (He was thrilled as he loved it). When Masters died it was bequeathed to his partner, I think. Wonder where it is now? Hanging on someone's wall I expect. I bet it would be worth a fortune today.........

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Am I the only viewer who misses TCM's Labor Day tributes to the Telluride Film Festival? I still have great memories of the year when Alexander Sokurov's 2002 historical drama "Russian Ark" kicked off the schedule.

 

russianark_movie.jpg?w=640

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  • 2 months later...

With that phony fight that will take place this Saturday,   replacing these boxing films with Jerry Lewis movies sounds just right!

 

FAT CITY and GOLDEN BOY rarely air on TCM, so hopefully the On the Ropes theme will be rescheduled in December or January.

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