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LD -- Not to be argumentative, but I thought the awkwardness was more James Edwards than Tim Carey. He starts off all, "Get outta here! We're closed!" but is soon offering to fluff Carey's pillow and heat up some Ovaltine.

 

I'm finally catching up to you. Edwards wasn't good in his small bit. His delivery was rushed. The dialogue wasn't the best, either. It does project awkwardness. Having said that, I still consider the scene believable because Carey used the sympathy card (handicapped war vets are hard to turn away) on the guard and then he topped it off with a bribe.

 

By the way, my Marie Windsor path has been similar to yours. The Narrow Margin was a film that made me a Windsor convert.

 

I'm off tomorrow but am expecting some contractors to do some work around the house. Maybe I'll have time to run to Blockbuster and rent "Rififi" and we can do a Siskel and Ebert number

 

Do you know Rififi is a foreign-language film?

 

Criss Cross is worth seeing for Yvonne DeCarlo alone. Her dancing scene is one of my favorite moments in noir. Very hot.

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>Do you know Rififi is a foreign-language film?

 

What. You sayin' I can't read? Huh? HUH?! Is that what you're sayin', smart boy?

 

I assumed so, yes.

 

>Criss Cross is worth seeing for Yvonne DeCarlo alone. Her dancing scene is one of my favorite moments in noir. Very hot.

 

Forgot "Rififi." I think I should concentrate on domestic noir. I'll hit the video store for "Criss Cross" instead. I'm intrigued by the plot summary on IMDb.

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Now youse guys are dissing in a single thread two of my favorite actors: Sterling Hayden & Timothy Carey.

 

Hayden: Not only wonderful in "Crime of Passion", "Terror in a Texas Town" and "Johnny Guitar" (the latter two being among the oddest Westerns ever made), but his is the key performance in "Dr. Strangelove". Terrifying and absolutely hilarious at the same time, not just due to the script, but a bravura performance. His restaurant scene in "The Godfather" is my favorite scene in the movie (okay, other than the baptism scene). His performance throughout "The Killing" captures both hopefulness and fatalism. I would say he's the best actor in one of my favorite movies, "Crime Wave", but that would diminish the role of . . .

 

Carey: "It's a conceptual thing" certainly applies here. He is absolutely unforgettable in "East of Eden", "Crime Wave", "The Killing", "Paths of Glory", and "Minnie and Moskowitz". Yes, and even in "Head" and "Beach Blanket Bingo" and several TV show episodes -- albeit, perhaps, "unforgettable" may not always be a virtue. The movie he produced, wrote, directed and starred in, "The World's Greatest Sinner", must be seen to be believed -- and then you still may not believe it. Either the worst or the most prescient movie ever made.

 

Kubrick liked using both of them, and Cassavetes used Carey at least twice (Cassavetes called Carey something along the lines of "the Eisenstein of acting", and I believe that Carey gave a eulogy at Cassavetes' funeral). That, dear film fans, satisfies me. Acting technique, acting shmechnique. Give me a performance I can feel, for good or for ill.

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ChiO aptly said: "Hayden: Not only wonderful in..."

 

And let us not forget Hayden's magnificent performance as the tortured Roger Wade in Robert Altman's brilliant 1973 adaptation of Raymond Chandler's THE LONG GOODBYE. He OWNS that movie!!

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>Now youse guys are dissing in a single thread two of my favorite actors: Sterling Hayden & Timothy Carey.

 

I didn't diss nobody, see? Alls I was sayin was that Hayden is one-dimensional. Lotsa actors are.

 

"Strangelove" was chilling, sure, because he spoke his lines as Sterling Hayden. Same with "The Godfather."

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>And let us not forget Hayden's magnificent performance as the tortured Roger Wade in Robert Altman's brilliant 1973 adaptation of Raymond Chandler's THE LONG GOODBYE. He OWNS that movie!!

 

I'd love to see that one again, though I have a hard time sitting through Altman's stuff.

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I like him there, too, Ken. I just don't think he had the broadest range as an actor. Neither did Sinatra - who said so himself. And neither did my beloved Marilyn, though she tried so hard, especially in "The Misfits."

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ChiO -- Sterling Hayden is in my top 30 for favorite actors, but I say that while agreeing with LuckyDan about him being rather one-dimensional. I just happen to love his hard-boiled style of acting. He had great presence on screen, both visually and audibly. Yes, I'm a fan or Mr. Carroll.

 

I just recently found out, thanks to Eddie Muller's commentary on *Crime Wave*, that Sterling suffered from stage fright. Jean Arthur is another one of my favorites who also suffered through this. That's rough.

 

I also enjoy Timothy Carey for his mugging. How could I not? He's the epitome of quirk and I love quirkiness in film. I liked your description of Carey's acting as "conceptual." That's a home run with me. I'm gonna view his performances in that light from here on out.

 

Miss Gun For Hire -- You better be careful, I still haven't seen *Gone with the Wind*. I could turn into Schnickel Doodle right before your eyes.

 

SmartBoy -- No need to apologize to this smart boy. I knew you were joking around. I hope you check out *Criss Cross* and the lovely Yvonne DeCarlo.

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LuckyDan & FrankGrimes -- One-dimensional? Perhaps. I prefer the term "idiosyncratic". Applicable to both Hayden and Carey.

 

Arkadin -- Accept my apology for straying off topic. Has anyone mentioned "Kansas City Confidential"?

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Timothy Carey...very interesting character hack-tor. Fun to watch though.

 

Yes...I understand the Edwards-Carey scene was just to provide tension to the possibility of being foiled and Carey certainly did chase him away.

 

I thought Windsor and Cook Jr. were extremely interesting team to watch.

 

When Dr. Ben Casey comes in with gunz blazing and the only one who survives the massacre is Elisha Cook Jr., YIKES! Then he really has to face his punishment when he goes home to Marie...without the money. Double YIEKES!! Loved the way Kubrick moves the camera over each body.

 

"The Killing" was more methodical in how to plot a heist than "CrissCross." "CrissCross" was just YvonneYvonneYvonne. Okay, ok... it was more than that. But I just wanted to get that in there.

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>How could I forget The Getaway (1972)?

 

Don't kick yourself, Arkadin, I forgot it, too. But I didn't really appreciate movies about crooks when I saw it. I was more interested in those days in movies that I could personally relate to. I need to give this one another viewing.

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>SmartBoy -- No need to apologize to this smart boy. I knew you were joking around. I hope you >check out Criss Cross and the lovely Yvonne DeCarlo.

 

I was afraid you might be thinking I'd gone schizzy on you.

 

And don't tell our leading lady, but I never thought much of "The Quiet Man," so if you don't like "GWTW," (though I think you will) let me know before you post. I'll create a distraction with a "Quiet Man" slam, and you can do an end-run with a bad "GWTW" review. I'll take all the heat and nobody will be the wiser. How's that for planning?

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LuckyDan -- And don't tell our leading lady, but I never thought much of "The Quiet Man," so if you don't like "GWTW," (though I think you will) let me know before you post. I'll create a distraction with a "Quiet Man" slam, and you can do an end-run with a bad "GWTW" review. I'll take all the heat and nobody will be the wiser. How's that for planning?

 

Leave it up to you to make me laugh out loud. This post got me. You've got a great sense of humor, LD. Definitely one of the best around here. And... keep that plan handy.

 

I think Miss G will forgive you for "not thinking much of" *The Quiet Man*. Slamming it would definitely be a different story, especially if you did it a smarmy, Schnickelish way. The steam from her "blonde noodle" would fry the board.

 

ChiO -- LuckyDan & FrankGrimes -- One-dimensional? Perhaps. I prefer the term "idiosyncratic". Applicable to both Hayden and Carey.

 

Idiosyncratic works for me. Hayden and Carey command attention. Having said that, I've often wondered if Hayden keeps one's attention. Does his style cause some to tune him out? I'm one who is often drawn to his style.

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Fascinating topic! I love heist films and books. ASPHALT JUNGLE is the prototype. Not saying it was the first. But it's the best and most imitated. Kubrick's film is very much like it. Also excellent. RIFFIFI is amazing, though all those "F's" make it hard to spell. I saw it in a theatre in Chicago. If only we could see all the great movies like that. Love CRISS-CROSS, though the second half slows a little. I call THE GETAWAY Peckinpah's best, and one of the great modern movies. Intense and nerve-wracking; the editing makes your head spin. I even enjoy some of the lesser examples. GAMBIT. HOW TO STEAL A MILLION. More recently, SNEAKERS and HEIST. It's hard to go wrong with this genre!

 

RR

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