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MissGoddess

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Rick, I'm with you in preferring the original version as well, partly for the reasons you point out (I do agree the remake has the look and feel of a TV movie) and because I'm generally biased towards the noirs that were made in the "classic noir era" others have mentioned (roughly 1941-1958/59).

 

Having said that, I'd recommend that anyone who hasn't seen both versions check both of them out. It's interesting to be able to compare and contrast between the two.

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I never even knew there was a remake of The Killers, much less that Ronald

Reagan of all people was in it. He played "the Swede"?? Is the "the Swede" a

"vicious thug"? I don't get that from Lancaster's portrayal (I read the story ages ago

and have no memory of the details). I thought he was just...dumb, a follower, whether

it was following hoods or dames. Reagan plays it for viciousness? Is TCM airing

this version in their spotlight this month? Have I asked enough questions? I'm sorry

about that, but you guys have me curious.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> I never even knew there was a remake of The Killers, much less that Ronald

> Reagan of all people was in it. He played "the Swede"?? Is the "the Swede" a

> "vicious thug"? I don't get that from Lancaster's portrayal (I read the story ages ago

> and have no memory of the details). I thought he was just...dumb, a follower, whether

> it was following hoods or dames. Reagan plays it for viciousness? Is TCM airing

> this version in their spotlight this month? Have I asked enough questions? I'm sorry

> about that, but you guys have me curious.

 

I always say, "you can never ask too many questions," unless of course, I don't know any of the answers! To clear things up right away, Reagan does _not_ play the Lancaster role; he plays the crime boss that the Lancaster character (in the remake, Cassavetes) double-crosses by stealing his woman (in the remake, Angie Dickinson). I'm not quite sure who played the crime boss in the original; whoever it was, the role was not a very big one, if I remember correctly.

 

One major difference in the two versions is that in the original, the insurance investigator, played by Edmond O'Brien, tries to ascertain why the "Swede" would just let himself be killed. In the remake, it's the actual killers who want to learn why the Cassavetes character would go along with his own death. I haven't seen either version in quite some time, but I'm sure there are other differences as well.

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Hi , Rick-are-my-eyes-really-brown?-Spade!

 

Reagan does not play the Lancaster role; he plays the crime boss that the Lancaster character (in the remake, Cassavetes) double-crosses by stealing his woman (in the remake, Angie Dickinson). I'm not quite sure who played the crime boss in the original; whoever it was, the role was not a very big one, if I remember correctly.

 

Thank you for clearing that up---wow, that would be quite a switch for him to play a role

like that. I've yet to see him in villain-mode. Cassavetes looks just like my father at that

age (except JC is much shorter) so it will be weird for me to see him at all, much less as

"the Swede". For the record, I've only seen JC in an episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents"

and one or two minutes of one other movie that escapes me.

 

I do like Angie, though. So when she made Point Blank it was a reunion for her and

Lee Marvin?

 

Thank you Kenny---for "Albert Dekker".

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Ken, don't you find it amusingly ironic that the very summer (1964) that Reagan (in movie theates) was belting poor Angie Dickinson in the chops in THE KILLERS, he was standing before the Republican Convention, nominating Barry Goldwater for president!

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_Rickspade_ wrote (undoubtedly with a cold-blooded intent): *but Cassavetes doesn't do much for me as an actor.*

 

I felt the dagger going in and am now bleeding all over the floor.

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I felt the dagger going in and am now bleeding all over the floor.

 

That's some fine work, Rick. ChiO is an elusive one who often finds a way to wriggle out

of the worst jams. He could use some bleeding. Now let's all throw a Timothy Carey

bash.

 

You know, Rick, you're all right when you can smack ChiO AND Dewey's mugs and still

come out breathin'. But I must warn you, be careful with Miss Goddess. She'll stab you.

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But I must warn you, be careful with Miss Goddess. She'll stab you.

 

Rick needn't worry. He's too smart to stick his neck out for nobody. :D

 

You, on the other hand...fit perfectly into the film noir mold!

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ChiO, Dewey---what the heck is a go-cart race doing in one of Papa's stories?! :D I was rummaging

around for some images from the movie and this came up. This is film noir? You guys need to please 'splain...

 

Well, I guess if they can have a carousel in The Third Man....

 

killersthe-cassavetes.jpg

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> {quote:title=ChiO wrote:}{quote}

> _Rickspade_ wrote (undoubtedly with a cold-blooded intent): *but Cassavetes doesn't do much for me as an actor.*

>

> I felt the dagger going in and am now bleeding all over the floor.

 

 

 

ChiO,

 

Trust me, that one was unintentional; I've always subscribed to Elisha Cook's advice to Lawrence Tierney in Born to Kill: "You can't just go around killing people whenever the notion strikes you. It's not feasible."

 

Are you a fan of Cassavetes's acting or his directorial efforts, or both? I haven't seen him in very much; I saw Husbands years ago when it came out, and liked it, maybe more for Peter Falk and Ben Gazzara, though. I'd like to see it again, it's been so long. I also saw A Woman Under the Influence, another good film, but he wasn't in that one, right? Just directed it. Other than those, I haven't seen him in much else, except The Dirty Dozen, (actually I thought he was quite good in that one), and of course, The Killers.

 

Sorry if I dissed one of your favorites.

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It's noir in the abstract, MissG, given that a) it was made in 1964 and B) it's in color. It is, nevertheless, a great crime film with a number of elements which harken back to the classic era

 

Thank you, Dewey. I look forward to checking it out. It occurs to me that I have never

seen Reagan in a movie from that late a date (1964).

 

I checked TCM's schedule and they aren't airing it for the Reagan spotlight, too bad---but I

have found it to rent so I will get to it eventually.

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>

> That's some fine work, Rick. ChiO is an elusive one who often finds a way to wriggle out

> of the worst jams. He could use some bleeding. Now let's all throw a Timothy Carey

> bash.

>

> You know, Rick, you're all right when you can smack ChiO AND Dewey's mugs and still

> come out breathin'. But I must warn you, be careful with Miss Goddess. She'll stab you.

 

Thanks for tip, Frank. She has a little of the Brigid O'Shaughnessey in her, does she? Well, Mrs. Spade didn't raise any fool for a son. MissGoddess won't catch me like Brigid caught Miles, "Up a blind alley, with his gun tucked away at his hip and his overcoat buttoned." No sir, I'll be ready.

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Dewey,

Ronnie was warming up to sock it to the American people for eight years. Back in those days the three major US TV networks covered the major parties convention more entensively. In an afternoon session of the 1964 GOP conclave, I was watching TV, while getting a haircut, Victory Jory & Lloyd Nolan were addressing the convention with the theme " Why I am a Republican ", I dont remember one thing that either of these gentlemen said, but I do remember, that at the time,I felt I had just heard two " Hate America " speeches.Both speeches were delivered in ( to me at least ) a blood curdling way, without a smile to be found.

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Pretty rugged stuff, Dewey. I can't believe I never heard of this version. Angie

looked beautiful.

 

I forgot I have seen Cassavetes in one other movie---playing Robert

Taylor's little punk brother in the western, Saddle the Wind. Did he always

play creeps?

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He often played creeps, or at least creepy.

A total creep in *THE NIGHT HOLDS TERROR* (55) and a juvenile delinquent in Don Siegel's *CRIME IN THE STREETS* (56). He was a sympathetic loser in Martin Ritt's *EDGE OF THE CITY* (57) and not really a creep, but again an "impressionable" loser in Siegel's *THE KILLERS* (64). Creepy again in Aldrich's *THE DIRTY DOZEN* (67) and the personification of evil as Mia Farrow's devilish husband in Polanski's *ROSEMARY'S BABY* (68) and in DePalma's *THE FURY* (78). His most significant foray into television cast him as private eye *JOHNNY STACCATO* - definitely NOT creepy!

Whether creepy or not, he remains, for me at least, one of Hollywood's most compelling geniuses, both in front of the camera and behind it.

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"Thanks, Kings Row is a film I've seen more than a few times. You're right, Annie gives one of her best performances, just as you described it. It shows her soft and tender side, with nice touches of humor."

 

You have described the lovely Sheridan succinctly. I don't know why, but she and Paulette Goddard seem like the most down-to-earth Hollywood glam girls that I've seen in movies and they make me smile. ("Castle on the the Hudson").

 

"As I've mentioned before, the weak spot for me in this movie is the rather cloying performance of Robert Cummings, who I thought was pretty good in some light comedies, but I don't care for him here."

 

I know what you mean about Cummings, but he's the lynchpin for me in that film. We see things through his soft brown eyes. He is so pretty and earnest in "King's Row." For me, I...ahem..."love that Bob!" ;-)

 

Thanxx for your response.

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Dewey,

 

Never having seen "Johnny Staccato", I just checked out a YouTube clip of the show,

an episode with pretty, young Elizabeth Montgomery. You're right, the music is

terrific---it sounds like Elmer Bernstein. So what does he play? A musician or

a private eye or both?

 

I love YouTube.

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He plays a failed jazz pianist who turns his sights on a career as a private detective, operating out of a jazz club called Waldo's run by Eduardo Ciannelli. Elmer Bernstein did in fact create the soundtrack score, with an incredible array of contemporary jazz musicians turning up at Waldo's on a regular basis. Only lasted one season, but each of those 27 episodes (from 1959-60) are nothing short of spectacular! There's some interesting stuff on the show over at SSO on the film noir fourm; check it out!

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> "As I've mentioned before, the weak spot for me in this movie is the rather cloying performance of Robert Cummings, who I thought was pretty good in some light comedies, but I don't care for him here."

>

> I know what you mean about Cummings, but he's the lynchpin for me in that film. We see things through his soft brown eyes. He is so pretty and earnest in "King's Row." For me, I...ahem..."love that Bob!" ;-)

>

> Thanxx for your response.

 

OK, I _wanted_ to like him in it because I didn't see this movie until years after I had watched him every week in. . .Love That Bob, one of my favorite TV shows from my youth. (I think I reached puberty in record time after seeing about four episodes of that show with his continuous parade of models; Joy Lansing alone was "worth the price of admission!"

 

Anyway, I'm glad Cummings works for you in Kings Row because it's certainly easier to enjoy the movie that way. I like Bob in comedies such as The Devil and Miss Jones, with Jean Arthur, one of my favorite comedies from the early forties.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> I'll take a look at the posts at the SSO. I love Elmer Bernstein.

 

 

Me, too, MissGoddess. He's one of the very best film score composers, particularly in the jazz medium. Last year I bought the entire soundtrack for Sweet Smell of Success, one of his very best scores. The first part has several tracks from the Chico Hamilton Quintet (the group that plays background music and appears in the film (w/ Martin Milner added.) The second part consists of several original tracks composed by Bernstein. It's terrific.

 

I also checked out the Johnny Staccato Youtube episode. It was a lot of fun, and Elizabeth Montgomery never looked more beautiful or more sexy. Thanks, folks.

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