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MissGoddess

Noir Gallery

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A Hitch good evening to you, Rick -- After all this "chatter" about Shadow, I'm now

really looking forward to seeing it again.

 

Do you remember why Shadow of a Doubt didn't do much for you? Is it because the

protagonist is a teenage girl? This is rather unique for Hitch. Young and Innocent is

the other Hitch film I can think of that features something similar.

 

Funny you should mention Treasure of the Sierra Madre. The "legend" is that Ann

made a brief cameo appearance in it as a streetwalker in an early scene in Mexico. I've

seen that movie more than half a dozen times (and I own a copy) and I've never been

able to positively identify her in that scene. Several months ago, there was a

discussion on another thread about this legend; the consensus, citing new written

material, is that it's a falsehood. The woman in the scene in question looks nothing

like Sheridan, and the feeling now is that it was just some extra Huston got to do

a walk-on.

 

Ahhhh, I did not know any of that. I just checked her filmography at IMDb and that was

the only film of "hers" that I have seen. Thanks for the lesson.

 

I like her in almost everything she ever did, but I would have to say my favorites would

be: Comedies: Torrid Zone, I Was a Male War Bride; Dramas: They Drive by Night;

City for Conquest; Kings Row; Nora Prentiss, and a terrific little film noir gem called

Woman on the Run.

 

I'm actually surprised to see your listing of I Was a Male War Bride. How refreshing.

So what one Sheridan film would you recommend to a guy who has never seen an

Ann Sheridan flick? If anyone else would like to answer that question, be my guest.

 

That's a very interesting point to consider. I think she would have been terrific in the

right Hitchcock movie.

 

I'm trying to think of what Hitchcock movie she'd most fit in and I'm struggling to come up

with one. Lifeboat?

 

I haven't seen that one in more than 20 years, and even though Bogie is in it, I don't

remember being knocked out by it either.

 

I liked seeing Bogie as a psycho but I wasn't used to seeing Missy in such a deferring

role. I'm used to seeing her in roles where she has some power and control.

 

I think Novak is very underrated, and in fact, a lot of people don't think much of her at

all. I've always thought she was one of the sexiest actresses of any era, and after seeing

her in films like Pushover, Pal Joey and certainly Vertigo, I think she was certainly

versatile and quite capable.

 

It's so good to hear some positive things said about Kim. She is exceptionally sexy. She

doesn't have to say a word for me to hear her. The only other actresses who do this

with me are Gloria Grahame and Claudia Cardinale.

 

I had only seen Kim in Vertigo until last year. It was Bell, Book and Candle

and The Man with the Golden Arm that really pushed me in her direction, particularly

the former.

 

As for Carole, no film noirs of course, but a genius at comedy, and a very good

dramatic actress as well. Which two of her films have you seen? Tragically, she died

right at the height of her career, and she was never any better (or more beautiful) than

in her last movie, the brilliant Lubitsch comedy, To Be or Not To Be.

 

I've seen Mr. and Mrs. Smith and My Man Godfrey. I just love her in the former.

I've got 22 Carole movies on DVD and tape, so it's my own damn fault that I haven't spent

more time with her.

 

Oh, my friend, if you have any interest in foreign films, you must see both Two Women

and Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, prime examples of Sophia's dramatic and

comedic talents, to say nothing of her drop-dead sexiness (well, at least in the latter.

There's a strip-tease scene in Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow that is as scalding

today as it was when it was filmed 45 years ago! Some of her American films are fun

too, but her Italian ones are really good.

 

Thank you for those two recommendations. It's her Italian films that do interest me the

most. I loved seeing Sophia at the Oscars this year. She stood on the stage with her

one hand on her hip. :)

 

Very good analogy, Frank. It's probably why I'm so comfortable going back-and-forth

with these discussions, too. I can remember many long winter nights hanging out in

Brooklyn bars with my friends arguing sports until last call at 4:00 a.m.. . .and then

continuing to argue when we headed out for breakfast!

 

Now that's a true diehard. Impressive.

 

Of all the classic film "genres" that can be discussed and dissected in the middle of

the night over some beverages of choice, I can only think of film noir. The psychological

angles alone provide for endless fodder. Ohh, heck, it's the dames.

 

So our bar is actually a gallery. We are such snobs. I know who the biggest snob is

here, too. :D No, believe it or not, it's not ChiO.

 

OK, tomorrow I'm going to try and post my top 25 films noir. Thanks so much for

posting your top 50. You've made it much easier for me to pick out just about all the

ones I'd put on my list. At my age, as the memory deteriorates on a daily basis, I could

use all the help I can get!

 

This is the film noir resource I have referenced the most since joining this board:

 

http://www.theyshootpictures.com/noir250noirs1.htm

 

Their criteria fits my criteria:

 

The 250 Quintessential Noir Films listing contains 241 films that all contain three key ingredients.

 

1) They were all produced in the United States;

2) They were all shot in black-and-white;

3) They were all produced between 1940 to 1959.

 

The nine films, that have been included, that exclude at least one of these key ingredients are two Non-American-produced noir (The Third Man and Mr. Arkadin), four colour noir films (Leave Her to Heaven, Niagara, Party Girl and Slightly Scarlet), and three films from the early 1960s (Cape Fear, Underworld, U.S.A. and The Naked Kiss).

 

As mentioned in the introduction, these 250 noir films aren't necessarily the best (although they would be very close to it), they are simply the films that - according to our research - have most often been cited as noir in publications and across the world-wide-web.

 

For interest sake, the top-ten most cited noir films are: Out of the Past (1947), The Maltese Falcon (1941), Laura (1944), Touch of Evil (1958), D.O.A. (1949), Double Indemnity (1944), The Killers (1946), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Big Sleep (1946) and Kiss Me Deadly (1955). The most cited years are between 1944 to 1958, with 1947 being the peak year.

 

If you were to look over that list, I'm pretty sure you'll come up with the majority of your

top 25, if not all of it.

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Hey, Quiet Gal -- Are you lost

 

What??? Isn't this the mushy love story forum?? HA!!

 

You don't want to be lost in this world

 

Haven't you heard?? I have been lurking on the dark side this week... with sinister films like... HARVEY...

 

In truth.. I have used the word "CREEPY" about 942 times today just talking about Night Must Fall... so "dark" is me... this week anyway..

 

Actually... I do look in here from time to time for a good read... you folks have a lot going on w/ the whole "NOIR" side of life over here. I only made my comment the other day just because I like Shadow of a Doubt so much... and to give you guys a "thumbs up"...

 

I think Old Uncle Charlie is a VERY nicely played MONSTER... very scary and so quietly menacing... In fact.. it's my favorite for both Joseph Cotten.. and Teresa Wright.. This is the film I think of first for both of them...

 

nice Screencaps!!

 

And then... you had to go and post THAT creepy (943) shot there... NOW I will have ONE MORE serial killer on my mind. Between old Joe/Uncle Charlie... and Robert Montgomery/Danny boy (in the Ramble's thread) I may never go to sleep again...

 

PS.. Re: Ann Sheridan... I am NO authority because I have only seen her in a few films...but I got to see King's Row the other night... She was TERRIFIC... flirty, fun, and VERY gutsy... yet.. compassionate... It's an interesting twisted tale in some respects so it might be right up your alley...

 

And there is a doctor who is WAY on the CREEPY side.. (944... I think I am going for a record here..) :-)

 

Ok.. sorry to interupt... back to NOIR LAND folks...

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> So what one Sheridan film would you recommend to a guy who has never seen an Ann Sheridan flick? If anyone else would like to answer that question, be my guest

 

I would recommend "The Man Who Came to Dinner", "Torrid Zone" and (of course) "Angels with Dirty Faces".

 

Message was edited by: moviefan1951

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Frank! Yes, I know, long time no see (or, hardly ever) on this thread.

 

I just discovered your film noir resource link. It is FANTASTIC!!!!

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_FrankSoulessGrimes_ inquired: *What's better, Oph?ls or Blast of Silence? Ohhhh, I know how you love those kind of questions.*

 

Answer: The Passion of Joan of Arc. And until you watch it, you will continue to have no Soul.

 

Given your completist tendencies (and ignoring the term "better"), however, go with *Blast of Silence* first. Then you can probably be the first on your block to say, "I have seen the complete film directoral output of Allen Baron." Consider it repayment for urging me to watch Dementia (thank you, thank you, thank you, by the way). Then hunker down with Ophuls -- you won't be disappointed either way.

 

My Dear Pro(and Con)Fessor Dewey: One of your Top 25 selections intrigues me -- The Amazing Mr. X. Of all the marvelous Eagle-Lion noirs of 1947-49 (did I hear "Anthony Mann" and "John Alton"?) in this crazy world, inquiring minds want to know what it is about that one, and not any of the others, that puts it in your Top 25. Probably time for me to re-view it.

 

My Edit: Oops. While researching other stuff, I discovered that Baron directed (or co-directed) two other movies: *Terror in the City* (1966) and *Outside In* (1972). He carried on with his noir sensibilities by directing episodes of numerous TV shows, including Kolchak: the Night Stalker, Charlie's Angels, The Brady Bunch, The Love Boat, and Love, American Style.

 

Message was edited by: ChiO

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> The Amazing Mr. X. Of all the marvelous Eagle-Lion noirs of 1947-49 (did I hear "Anthony Mann" and "John Alton"?) in this crazy world, inquiring minds want to know what it is about that one, and not any of the others, that puts it in your Top 25. Probably time for me to re-view it.

 

I am curious about this as well. It's been ages since I've watched it, and I do admit it's a great little chiller. I'd love to hear what others' thoughts are on this, as well.

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>>

> Do you remember why Shadow of a Doubt didn't do much for you? Is it because the

> protagonist is a teenage girl? This is rather unique for Hitch. Young and Innocent is

> the other Hitch film I can think of that features something similar.

> Hi Frank,

 

It's been so long since I saw it, I can't put my finger on exactly why it didn't grab me, so to speak. I don't think it had anything to do with the age of teresa wright's character, however, because that's not the kind of thing that would normally prevent me from liking a film. I have a vague feeling that I just never bought into the believability of the story, although admittedly, if you use that criteria, then you have a problem with 90 percent of Hitchcock's films! Anyway, I hope to see it this coming Tuesday and then I'll give you some feedback.

 

>

> I'm actually surprised to see your listing of I Was a Male War Bride. How refreshing.

> So what one Sheridan film would you recommend to a guy who has never seen an

> Ann Sheridan flick? If anyone else would like to answer that question, be my guest.

>

Well, that's tough; I would say I'd have to recommend two, one for her comedic talents, another for her dramatic skills. Torrid Zone for the former (especially if you like Cagney and Pat O'Brien, who are both brilliant and hysterical in it), and then City for Conquest for the latter, another great pairing with Cagney, and a very touching story (although the music angle is a bit over the top). I guess I'd add one more, They Drive by Night, which displays a very good combination of her wise-cracking, down-to-earth personality and her nice romantic side as well.

 

Others here have mentioned films such as The Man Who Came to Dinner and Angels with Dirty Faces; I love her in both of those, but she has a very supporting role in each. (Actually in Dinner you can see her "glamorous" side, which was not very often on display, since Warners chose to give her many "working-girl type roles. In Dinner she's gorgeous (and funny).

 

>

> I'm trying to think of what Hitchcock movie she'd most fit in and I'm struggling to come up

> with one. Lifeboat?

>

That's not bad, but out of curiosity, I would have liked to see her in perhaps, Notorious, opposite Cary Grant, with whom I don't believe she ever made a film. However, she might have been a bit too old for the role, and of course, it's difficult to imagine anyone but the lovely Ingrid playing that part.

 

>

>

 

> I> > I've seen Mr. and Mrs. Smith and My Man Godfrey. I just love her in the former.

> I've got 22 Carole movies on DVD and tape, so it's my own damn fault that I haven't spent

> more time with her.

 

Yes, you must get to some of those 22 movies, and soon.

>

> >

>

> Of all the classic film "genres" that can be discussed and dissected in the middle of

> the night over some beverages of choice, I can only think of film noir. The psychological

> angles alone provide for endless fodder. Ohh, heck, it's the dames.

>

> So our bar is actually a gallery. We are such snobs. I know who the biggest snob is

> here, too. :D No, believe it or not, it's not ChiO.

>

> >

> This is the film noir resource I have referenced the most since joining this board:

>

> http://www.theyshootpictures.com/noir250noirs1.htm

>

> Their criteria fits my criteria:

>

> The 250 Quintessential Noir Films listing contains 241 films that all contain three key ingredients.

>

> 1) They were all produced in the United States;

> 2) They were all shot in black-and-white;

> 3) They were all produced between 1940 to 1959.

>

> The nine films, that have been included, that exclude at least one of these key ingredients are two Non-American-produced noir (The Third Man and Mr. Arkadin), four colour noir films (Leave Her to Heaven, Niagara, Party Girl and Slightly Scarlet), and three films from the early 1960s (Cape Fear, Underworld, U.S.A. and The Naked Kiss).

>

> As mentioned in the introduction, these 250 noir films aren't necessarily the best (although they would be very close to it), they are simply the films that - according to our research - have most often been cited as noir in publications and across the world-wide-web.

>

> For interest sake, the top-ten most cited noir films are: Out of the Past (1947), The Maltese Falcon (1941), Laura (1944), Touch of Evil (1958), D.O.A. (1949), Double Indemnity (1944), The Killers (1946), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Big Sleep (1946) and Kiss Me Deadly (1955). The most cited years are between 1944 to 1958, with 1947 being the peak year.

>

> If you were to look over that list, I'm pretty sure you'll come up with the majority of your

> top 25, if not all of it.

 

Thanks, for the link and all the additional info. Now, I just have to get my thoughts in order and compose my list. See you later.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote} I could have sworn I saw Arkadin list The Night of the Hunter on a film noir list.

 

Nope. Not me. I'll have to be brief here as my regular computer is being rebuilt. I managed to get wifey's old warhorse up and running, but pages are taking over a min. to load and the thing crashes after 5 min and I have to reboot.

 

I see *Night of the Hunter* more connected to 20's Germanic expressionism horror than noir (using Gish was an intentional link to the silent era). In the talking film world, I see it closer to dark fairy tale films like *Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs* (1937) or even Argento's *Suspiria* (1977).

 

As far as a great Sheridan film for a newbie, one I very much recommend is *Edge of Darkness* (1943). You can find a small thread on this one in the War Film section.

 

I hope to be up and running as usual in a couple of weeks. Until then, I'll log on and post if and how this piece of junk permits.

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This sounds like an interesting book, and it isn't even out of print (amazon seems to have it for a very reasonable price). I'm definitely ordering it.

 

87286100445910M.gif

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> {quote:title=Arkadin wrote:}{quote}

> I see *Night of the Hunter* more connected to 20's Germanic expressionism horror than noir (using Gish was an intentional link to the silent era). In the talking film world, I see it closer to dark fairy tale films like *Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs* (1937) or even Argento's *Suspiria* (1977).

>

 

I would totally agree with Arkadin on this one. Not really noirish, but it does seem to owe a lot to German expressionism. Stanley Cortez's camerawork was superb, too.

 

Good luck with your computer, Arkadin. :)

 

 

> {quote:title=Rickspade wrote:}{quote}

> I have a vague feeling that I just never bought into the believability of the story, although admittedly, if you use that criteria, then you have a problem with 90 percent of Hitchcock's films! Anyway, I hope to see it this coming Tuesday and then I'll give you some feedback.

>

 

I hope to watch it Tuesday, too. I've not seen it in ages so I really need to refresh my memory. Look forward to everyone's comments after the TCM broadcast.

 

> Well, that's tough; I would say I'd have to recommend two, one for her comedic talents, another for her dramatic skills. Torrid Zone for the former (especially if you like Cagney and Pat O'Brien, who are both brilliant and hysterical in it), and then City for Conquest for the latter, another great pairing with Cagney, and a very touching story (although the music angle is a bit over the top). I guess I'd add one more, They Drive by Night, which displays a very good combination of her wise-cracking, down-to-earth personality and her nice romantic side as well.

>

> Others here have mentioned films such as The Man Who Came to Dinner and Angels with Dirty Faces; I love her in both of those, but she has a very supporting role in each. (Actually in Dinner you can see her "glamorous" side, which was not very often on display, since Warners chose to give her many "working-girl type roles. In Dinner she's gorgeous (and funny).

>

 

That's a very good point, since she was quite good at both comedic and dramatic parts, and I think I frankly like her better in the former, I enjoy "Torrid Zone" for all the reasons you name, I enjoy all of the movies that Cagney and O'Brien made together, even the one about the Hollywood screenwriters, which I think is sort of an acquired taste. ;)

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> {quote:title=Arkadin wrote:}{quote}

>

> As far as a great Sheridan film for a newbie, one I very much recommend is *Edge of Darkness* (1943). You can find a small thread on this one in the War Film section.

>

Hi Arkadin,

 

It's probably been more than 20 years since I've seen this one, but I remember liking it very much, and thinking that both Flynn and Annie were very good in this excellent resistance movement-World War II movie. Thanks for calling it out as another terrific Sheridan film. And I echo the voices on the War Film thread calling for TCM to put this one on the schedule soon; it's been way too long since it's been shown anywhere.

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ChiO mused: *One of your Top 25 selections intrigues me -- The Amazing Mr. X. Of all the marvelous Eagle-Lion noirs of 1947-49 (did I hear "Anthony Mann" and "John Alton"?) in this crazy world, inquiring minds want to know what it is about that one, and not any of the others, that puts it in your Top 25. Probably time for me to re-view it.*

 

Of all the noir films from my list *THE AMAZING MR. X* is the one I?m acquainted with the longest. It was a staple of mid-afternoon and late show TV showings all through the 50s and 60s and I must have seen it a half dozen times by the time I was twelve. I was never completely sure what it was about exactly but it was creepy, a little bit scary, kind of funny, and very, very sad. The star, Lynn Bari was an exotically beautiful actress to me, which made the film?s exploitation of her character's grief and loneliness so uncomfortable to bear.

 

It?s a deceptively lighthearted story with a deeply melancholy undercurrent steered along by diabolical doings and apparent supernatural occurrences: this vulnerable and romantic young widow?s sudden absorption into the world of spiritualism after the unexpected death of her husband makes her such a ripe target for corruption and violence that it places the film squarely and automatically in the noir universe.

 

Eagle-Lion, developing out of PRC (think Ulmer's *DETOUR* ), the one-time lowliest and most sacred of the poverty row studios dotting the Hollywood landscape, produced and released, as we all know, a torrent of blazing, visually thrilling noirs during the late 40s. Their noir ouput was largely dominated by Anthony Mann and his cinematographer of choice, John Alton. Mann and Alton?s *T-MEN, RAW DEAL* and *CANON CITY* (directed by Crane Wilbur, shot by Alton) are but three relentlessly brutal, deterministic male-driven films; they are instantly recognizable as signature examples of the style.

 

Alton also shot *THE AMAZING MR. X* (for director Bernard Vorhaus), a film that could aptly be described in the 40s jargon as a women?s picture?only with the added appearance of a subversive and visually stimulating blend of the occult and subtle eroticism?infusing this mysterious little hybrid with a fascinating and provocative dimension. Each frame of the film is a postage stamp picture of dense, pure romantic noir perfection.

 

And *MR. X* has the thoroughly unusual Cathy O?Donnell?fresh from her work in Nicholas Ray?s *THE LIVE BY NIGHT* ?here playing Lynn Bari?s devilishly dreamy and self-centered younger sister who finds herself becoming similarly enslaved by the unnamable otherworldly forces that surround her---namely Turhan Bey as the smoldering swami who seems to control both sisters at once. A uniquely poetic portrayal of a young girl?s true sexual and spiritual awakenings. Yet she is only one slender link *MR. X* might have to some of Nicholas Ray?s films?those that deal openly and honestly with symbolically-charged imagery and characters drawn by the emotional dynamics of loneliness and loss.

 

An eerie and fairly well-known production sidelight: Lynn Bari was not the original choice of the producers for the lead role. It was to be played by Carole Landis who was terrific as Betty Grable?s sexy showgirl sister in *I WAKE UP SREAMING* (1941). Shortly before production on *MR. X* began, Landis committed suicide, the end result of her disastrous love affair with Rex Harrison. Lynn Bari was cast, literally at the last moment, but the painful specter of loss and loneliness lingered and was not lost on *THE AMAZING MR. X.*

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Where's the word, Rick? -- It's been so long since I saw it, I can't put my finger

on exactly why it didn't grab me, so to speak. I don't think it had anything to do with the

age of teresa wright's character, however, because that's not the kind of thing that would

normally prevent me from liking a film. I have a vague feeling that I just never bought into

the believability of the story, although admittedly, if you use that criteria, then you have

a problem with 90 percent of Hitchcock's films! Anyway, I hope to see it this coming

Tuesday and then I'll give you some feedback.

 

I hope you catch it, Charlie.

 

Well, that's tough; I would say I'd have to recommend two, one for her comedic talents,

another for her dramatic skills. Torrid Zone for the former (especially if you like Cagney

and Pat O'Brien, who are both brilliant and hysterical in it), and then City for Conquest

for the latter, another great pairing with Cagney, and a very touching story (although the

music angle is a bit over the top). I guess I'd add one more, They Drive by Night, which

displays a very good combination of her wise-cracking, down-to-earth personality and

her nice romantic side as well.

 

I prefer serious to comedy in the classic world, so City for Conquest and

They Drive by Night look to be the ones to go with, particularly the latter.

 

I'm not sure if I'm going to be a Cagney fan or not yet. He's an actor I haven't come

across much.

 

Others here have mentioned films such as The Man Who Came to Dinner and Angels

with Dirty Faces; I love her in both of those, but she has a very supporting role in

each. (Actually in Dinner you can see her "glamorous" side, which was not very often

on display, since Warners chose to give her many "working-girl type roles. In Dinner

she's gorgeous (and funny).

 

I'd probably prefer her in a wise-cracking role.

 

That's not bad, but out of curiosity, I would have liked to see her in perhaps, Notorious,

opposite Cary Grant, with whom I don't believe she ever made a film. However, she might

have been a bit too old for the role, and of course, it's difficult to imagine anyone but the

lovely Ingrid playing that part.

 

I thought about Notorious, as well. I can definitely see Missy playing

"Alicia Huberman," although the end may be the toughest part for her. I love Ingrid's

softness and vulnerability at the end. Ohh, heck, I just love Ingrid's vulnerability

throughout. She plays tough, but she's anything but. She's merely longing. I just

love the game "Alicia" and "Devlin" play. I can see Barbara playing this, though.

 

Yes, you must get to some of those 22 movies, and soon.

 

What Carole film would you recommend?

 

Thanks, for the link and all the additional info. Now, I just have to get my thoughts in

order and compose my list. See you later.

 

I look forward to seeing your favorite film noir list.

 

You may enjoy Eddie Muller's:

 

http://www.eddiemuller.com/top25noir.html

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I watched NIGHT MUST FALL last night and some of the things Robert Montgomery's

character said sounded almost exactly like what Joseph Cotten's "Uncle Charlie" said.

Especially their respective views on people, their "true" character and what the world

is like in their eyes. Each also considered themselves much, much cleverer and

deserving of all the good things in life than anybody else. It was...creepy!

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I watched NIGHT MUST FALL last night and some of the things Robert Montgomery's

character said sounded almost exactly like what Joseph Cotten's "Uncle Charlie" said.

Especially their respective views on people, their "true" character and what the world

is like in their eyes. Each also considered themselves much, much cleverer and

deserving of all the good things in life than anybody else. It was...creepy!

 

That's fascinating. Montgomery makes for a better serial killer since it seems women

tend to find him more attractive. It looks I'm gonna have to dig up my tape of

Night Must Fall.

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I think you should watch it. It's not long and moves quickly. There are lots of layers to

the characters, especially his and Rosalind's. I always find it amazing that this

movie was made in 1937 and at MGM. It doesn't cut any corners either. I think you'll

like it, or at least the performances.

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You have sold me on Night Must Fall, Miss Gun for Hire. I'll see if I can watch it this

week. Can I actually like another 30s film? :P

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> You have sold me on Night Must Fall, Miss Gun for Hire. I'll see if I can watch it this

> week. Can I actually like another 30s film? :P

 

It has all the elements you like: weirdos, psychos, serial killing and most of all the movie

is about the dark side. Just your type!

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It has all the elements you like: weirdos, psychos, serial killing and most of all the

movie is about the dark side. Just your type!

 

But it's a 30s Hollywood film! :P

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

>

> But it's a 30s Hollywood film! :P

 

SWWM04.jpg?t=1237762713

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Kim! That should bring a smile to Rick Spade's mug.

 

It brings a smile to my face, too! :D

 

Speaking of *The Amazing Mr. X*, a new double feature is being released on DVD by the end of the month that includes that movie and *Reign of Terror*.

 

*Classic Film Noir Double Feature Vol 3: Amazing Mr. X aka: The Spiritualist & Reign of Terror aka: Black Book* is released by VCI home video and will sell for less than $15, you can see more details here:

http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Film-Noir-Double-Feature/dp/B001PT6YGY

 

> http://www.eddiemuller.com/top25noir.html

 

That is a GREAT list! I am not sure that *The Maltese Falcon* shouldn't have been maybe just a wee bit higher, heh heh. ;)

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Kim! That should bring a smile to Rick Spade's mug.

 

A smile to my face...and then some, if you get my drift.

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A smile to my face...and then some, if you get my drift.

 

:D Those rocks look mighty close. Ahhh, the heck with it. Fool steam ahead.

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> Classic Film Noir Double Feature Vol 3: Amazing Mr. X aka: The Spiritualist & Reign of Terror aka: Black Book is released by VCI home video and will sell for less than $15, you can see more details here:

http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Film-Noir-Double-Feature/dp/B001PT6YGY

 

That sounds like a pretty good deal, that's two noirs for the price of one. I'm going to have to add that to my order (the one for the noir book). Then I'm sure to get free shipping! :D

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