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MissGoddess

Noir Gallery

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The thing I liked best about *Scarlet Street* was the look of the film. And Dan Duryea was good, as always.

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Well how obsessed am I to check out TCM City. I am right now writing from the Soho Apple Store on Prince Street.

 

As soon as I'm finished watching "Scarlett Street" I'll tell ya what I thought.

 

Now about your notepad of ideas...

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Lovely photos, Miss Snippy.

 

Hola, CineBabe -- Well how obsessed am I to check out TCM City. I am right now

writing from the Soho Apple Store on Prince Street.

 

Is that Johnny Prince Street?

 

As soon as I'm finished watching "Scarlett Street" I'll tell ya what I thought.

 

Yeah, well, you better have liked it. :P

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I'm with "The Crimes of Grimes" on this one. SCARLET STREET is darkly poetic. And deliciously clever.

I, myself, didn't appreciate it until a second viewing. Like Mr. Grimes, it grows on you.

 

Message was edited by: redriver

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> {quote:title=redriver wrote:}{quote}

> I'm with "The Crimes of Grimes" on this one. SCARLET STREET is darkly poetic. And deliciously clever.

> I, myself, didn't appreciate it until a second viewing. Like Mr. Grimes, it grows on you.

>

 

I'm not sure if I've even seen it more than once, but you make it sound so appealing... ;)

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FrankG's "MIssSnippy" had me chuckling. Of course, I know you post these great Women In The Window pix to bait me, knowing fully well my next several moments will be using them to my own wicked purposes. You too are SO awful!!

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Here Ollie, another image for Joan Bennett from *Scarlet Street*

 

JoanB-ScarletStreetLARGE.jpg

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...and Fritz Lang's Secret Beyond the Door, which I'm curious to see.

SecretBeyondtheDoor-Joan-1.jpg

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> [u>

> What's up, Rick? -- >

> To quote one great line from Chandler's essay where he extolled the virtues of Hammett's writing in comparison to the authors of earlier 20th century mysteries, Chandler wrote,

> "Hammett took murder out of the Venetian vase and dropped it into the alley; it doesn't

> have to stay there forever, but it looked like a good idea to get as far as possible from

> Emily Post's idea of how a well-bred debutante gnaws a chicken wing."

>

> That's definitely more my speed. I get the feeling film noir is more masculine while mystery

> is more feminine. Laura is one of those films that attempts to mix the two. What is

> your take with that?

 

>I agree completely about Laura; it tries to "have it both" ways. . .and succeeds greatly. The whole "multiple suspects" angle, and the world of high society and high culture in which Laura travels is almost never part of the traditional film noir milieu, but the circumstances of Laura's "death," McPherson's obsession with her, and the deviousness of some of the characters are straight out of noir. That makes for a deadly, and wonderful, combination

 

>I haven't been around this thread for several days, and what happens while I'm gone? A five or six-way discussion breaks out, complete with magnificent images, of FrankG's #1 film noir (and my #3).

 

>Note to CineMaven: Hope by the time you're done with Scarlet Street you come to the same conclusion that Frank and I reached long ago: the film belongs in the pantheon of film noir. By the way, I too am a big Margaret Lindsay fan; she was a very underrated actress, and in case you haven't already, you should make a point to catch her in those early-to-mid-1930s Warners' films with Cagney: Lady Killer (1933), Devil Dogs of the Air (1935), Frisco Kid (1935) and 'G' Men (1935); they had a terrific rapport together. Obviously she spent a big chunk of her career relegated to playing the best friend and or rival to such stars as Bette Davis and Barbara Stanwyck, which is a shame. Warners should have give her better opportunities to shine in the lead. In some roles she reminded me of a brunette Ann Sheridan, a good combination of wholesomeness and feistiness.

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Hi guys. I missed the great (and recurrent) _Scarlett Street_ vs. _Woman in the Window_ debate last week but that's not going to stop me from chiming in.

Do you know a four-letter word for "keeps my interest"? It's P L O T. I just never bought the Eddie Robinson naivete in Scarlett Street. I do however have to applaud Cinemaven who really picks up on how sensational Margaret Lindsay is in this - who couldn't love a gal who's been around the block a couple of times yet still laughs at the irony of expecting to find Mr. Right?

But in WitW , Ms. Joan Bennett is fantastic and I fall under her spell as much as EGR does. Yeah, people beat up on this because of the cop-out ending but really, admit it, aren't you glad our boy is OK?

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That is an absolutely mesmerizing still from Secret Beyond the Door, Miss Gun for Hire.

If only TCM could find a way to play it.

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Where's the score, Rick? -- I get the feeling film noir is more masculine while

mystery is more feminine. Laura is one of those films that attempts to mix the two. What

is your take with that?

 

I agree completely about Laura; it tries to "have it both" ways. . .and succeeds greatly. The whole "multiple suspects" angle, and the world of high society and high culture in which

Laura travels is almost never part of the traditional film noir milieu, but the circumstances

of Laura's "death," McPherson's obsession with her, and the deviousness of some of the

characters are straight out of noir. That makes for a deadly, and wonderful, combination.

 

That's perfectly said. I definitely agree with your assessment. McPherson (Dana Andrews)

is film noir and Laura (Gene Tierney) is mystery. It's a terrific meshing of the two. The

"dream awakening" scene combines film noir with fantasy, also.

 

Note to CineMaven: Hope by the time you're done with Scarlet Street you come to the

same conclusion that Frank and I reached long ago: the film belongs in the pantheon of film

noir.

 

From what she has said so far, it ain't lookin' good.

 

By the way, I too am a big Margaret Lindsay fan; she was a very underrated actress, and in case you haven't already, you should make a point to catch her in those early-to-mid-1930s Warners' films with Cagney: Lady Killer (1933), Devil Dogs of the Air (1935), Frisco Kid (1935) and 'G' Men (1935); they had a terrific rapport together. Obviously she spent a big chunk of her career relegated to playing the best friend and or rival to such stars as Bette Davis and Barbara Stanwyck, which is a shame. Warners should have give her better opportunities to shine in the lead. In some roles she reminded me of a brunette Ann Sheridan, a good combination of wholesomeness and feistiness.

 

Wow! You just compared Lindsay to your gal. I'm impressed. She certainly knows how to

crack wise.

 

Hey there, NatchuraLee -- Hi guys. I missed the great (and recurrent) Scarlett Street

vs. Woman in the Window debate last week but that's not going to stop me from chiming in.

 

Anytime, anywhere.

 

Do you know a four-letter word for "keeps my interest"? It's P L O T. I just never bought

the Eddie Robinson naivete in Scarlett Street.

 

I can vouch for the naivet?. I'm the kind of lonely guy who can easily fall sucker for a woman

who gives me attention. I truly "get" Chris Cross. Most everything he feels in the film, I can

relate to.

 

I do however have to applaud Cinemaven who really picks up on how sensational Margaret

Lindsay is in this - who couldn't love a gal who's been around the block a couple of times

yet still laughs at the irony of expecting to find Mr. Right?

 

That made me laugh. That was good!

 

But in WitW , Ms. Joan Bennett is fantastic and I fall under her spell as much as EGR

does. Yeah, people beat up on this because of the cop-out ending but really, admit it, aren't

you glad our boy is OK?

 

I prefer nightmares with film noir, but I'm also someone who does like the ending to

The Woman in the Window.

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"I do however have to applaud Cinemaven who really picks up on how sensational Margaret Lindsay is in this - who couldn't love a gal who's been around the block a couple of times yet still laughs at the irony of expecting to find Mr. Right?" - N.Lee.

 

Aw shucks, Lee! I'll take that applause. But it's really Margaret Lindsay who should be getting the applause for a consistently quietly successful career as a character actress. I look for her in a film.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> That is an absolutely mesmerizing still from Secret Beyond the Door, Miss Gun for Hire.

> If only TCM could find a way to play it.

 

I really wish they would, since it's only available on DVD overseas. :(

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I really wish they would, since it's only available on DVD overseas.

 

I'm not sure what studio owns the rights to the film. It was a Universal release but it looks

like Republic was the home video distributor.

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> I'm not sure what studio owns the rights to the film. It was a Universal release but it looks

> like Republic was the home video distributor.

 

If Universal was the original theatrical distributor, they probably still own the rights. The R2 DVD available from Amazon.co.uk seems to be a Spanish release from Universal Home Video - another indication they probably still control worldwide rights.

 

Now, remember that Universal will occasionally lease their movies to other home video companies like Criterion. I don't know if that's what happened with the VHS release; however if Universal still has the rights, there's always a chance they could lease it to Criterion for a DVD release

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I really wish they would, since it's only available on DVD overseas.

>

> I'm not sure what studio owns the rights to the film. It was a Universal release but it looks

> like Republic was the home video distributor.

 

 

Especially when it comes to overseas releases, the "studio" situation gets even more crazy

and mixed up. G-R-E-E-D.

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RICKSPADE - "Note to CineMaven: Hope by the time you're done with Scarlet Street you come to the same conclusion that Frank and I reached long ago: the film belongs in the pantheon of film noir. By the way, I too am a big Margaret Lindsay fan; she was a very underrated actress, and in case you haven't already, you should make a point to catch her in those early-to-mid-1930s Warners' films with Cagney: Lady Killer (1933), Devil Dogs of the Air (1935), Frisco Kid (1935) and 'G' Men (1935); they had a terrific rapport together. Obviously she spent a big chunk of her career relegated to playing the best friend and or rival to such stars as Bette Davis and Barbara Stanwyck, which is a shame. Warners should have give her better opportunities to shine in the lead. In some roles she reminded me of a brunette Ann Sheridan, a good combination of wholesomeness and feistiness."

 

Hi there Rick. A fellow-Margaret Lindsay fan, ey? I fall in love easily...so be careful telling me that: it could get you unwanted attention from me. (Ooh, I should say: "no, seriously" so I won't scare you). I am a big fan of hers, and this morning...hopefully you caught her in "THE DRAGON MURDER CASE" with Warren William as Philo Vance. (Also, if you watch Doris Day's "PLEASE DON'T EAT THE DAISIES" you will Lindsay in a small small part as a socialite hostess).

 

I have, in fact, seen "Devil Dogs of the Air" and "G Men" and some of "Frisco Kid." I understand she did a really fantastic job in "The House of the Seven Gables." I enjoyed her with Kay Francis in "House on 56th Street." I know I'm just running on and on with: I like her in this. I like her in that." We have a Movie Rambles thread...but not a Movie Babbling thread.

 

With so many stars back then, it was probably really hard to stand out. And then again she wasn't your typical cheesecake so the studio heads in Hollywood probably didn't bed her; didn't vest a lot of interest in her. Smart-looking, smart-sounding, a you already had Eve Arden and Rosalind Russell and Gail Patrick. What's a gal to do.

 

A real real shame.

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np5mhl.jpg

 

Rickspade, NatchuraLee & CM, thanks for all the great words about Margaret Lindsay. Being that this is a gallery thread, I thought it only fitting to have at least an occasional photo of her. ;)

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

>

>

> I know I'm just running on and on with: I like her in this. I like her in that." We have a Movie Rambles thread...but not a Movie Babbling thread.

>

 

"Ramble" or babble all you want here. :)

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