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MissGoddess

Who else likes Lana?

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Harlow, Loy, Grace, Ava, Deborah, Astor, Sophia, Doris, Garbo, Stanwyck, Lamarr, your Vivling, Marilyn and below...LANA among others...

 

I canNOT imagine standing that close to Clark Gable, having him look deep into my eyes. Those shots you have of the King and Lana are whoa! No wonder Lombard raced back...a fatefully sad decision.

 

Thanxx for the shots LadyG. Nice!

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Glad you enjoyed them, Mlle. Maven. I love seeing Lana paired with dark haired, rugged actors

like Clark and John Garfield. Visually, it's just so attractive looking..

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Lana is another big favorite of mine, she was beautiful young, and even more as she got older.

I love her in the rarely seen Green Dolphin Street. FG

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

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Don't forget today's Lana joining John Garfield to wish him a happy birthday! ;)

 

*The Postman Always Rings Twice* (1946) 5:30pm ET

Illicit lovers plot to kill the woman's older husband.

Cast: Lana Turner, John Garfield, Cecil Kellaway, Hume Cronyn Dir: Tay Garnett BW-113 mins, TV-PG

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I found the coffee table photo book Miss Goddess wrote about at my library late last year. I have not been a Lana Turner fan but found the pictures and Cheryl Crane's remembrances as well as her version of "the incident" interesting.

 

One thing got me angry: The Warner Bros. stills versus the MGM pics. There are at least two Warner shots where she has long auburn hair and she looks like a honestly beautiful young girl. That Lana had something real. Then MGM stuck her head in a tub of bleach and she seemed less approachable. This is just my opinion but I wonder what kind of career she would have had au natural. In any event, I recommend the book even if it's so big and heavy you might need a dolly to lug it anywhere.

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> {quote:title=wouldbestar wrote:}{quote}

> One thing got me angry: The Warner Bros. stills versus the MGM pics. There are at least two Warner shots where she has long auburn hair and she looks like a honestly beautiful young girl. That Lana had something real. Then MGM stuck her head in a tub of bleach and she seemed less approachable. This is just my opinion but I wonder what kind of career she would have had au natural. In any event, I recommend the book even if it's so big and heavy you might need a dolly to lug it anywhere.

 

You know, I never really thought about that, but it's a good point. Were they still trying to go for the Jean Harlow look when she went over to MGM?

 

Anyway, I'll keep an eye out for the book. :)

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Lana with Jeff Chandler in The Lady Takes a Flyer. I wish TCM would

air this one, I haven't seen it since the "old" AMC aired it.

jeffchandler-lana.jpg

 

jeffchandler-lana2.jpg

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Found some lovely Lana pictures today to share...

 

*Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde*

lana-tracy-DrJMrH.jpg

 

*Cass Timberlaine* (one of my favorites)

cass-timberlane-1947.jpg

 

Lana-3MusketeersLobbyCard.jpg?t=12875911

 

lana-21.jpg

 

lana-22.jpg

 

lana-23.jpg

 

lana-24.jpg

 

lana-25.jpg

 

lana-26.jpg

 

lana-and-her-great-dane.jpg

 

*with Ann Rutherford and Paulette Goddard*

lana-ann-rutherford-paulette.jpg?t=12875

 

*with Ava Gardner*

lana-ava-2.jpg

 

lana-ava1.jpg

 

*Green Dolphin Street*

lana-green-dolphin-street.jpg?t=12875910

 

*Marriage is a Private Affair* - I hope TCM shows this, I've never seen it.

lana-hodiak-marriage-is-a-private-affair

 

*with Judy Garland*

lana-judy.jpg

 

*with June Allyson in The Three Musketeers*

lana-june-three-musketeers.jpg?t=1287591

 

*with Marjorie Main and Claire Trevor in **** Tonk*

lana-marjorie-claire-honky-tonk-1941.jpg

 

lana-turner-clark-gable.jpg

 

 

*with Susan Peters in Keep Your Powder Dry*

lana-susanpeters-keep-powder-dry.jpg

 

lana-turner-10.jpg

 

lana-turner-11.jpg

 

lana-turner-12.jpg

 

lana-turner-13.jpg

 

lana-turner-14.jpg

 

lana-turner-16.jpg

 

 

I love these Renaissance style pictures, does anyone

have any idea what film they could be from? She's extremely young here.

lana-turner-17.jpg

 

lana-turner-18.jpg

 

lana-turner-1941.jpg

 

*with Fernando Lamas*

lana-turner-fernando-lamas-1951.jpg

 

*The Sea Chase* (another favorite)

lana-turner-JW-SeaChase-1.jpg?t=12875916

 

*with L.B. Mayer and Tony Martin*

lana-turner-lb-mayer-tony-martin-1941.jp

 

*A Life of Her Own* (yet another favorite, but very depressing)

lana-turner-ray-milland-a-life-of-her-ow

 

*Johnny Eager*

lana-turner-robertT-JohnnyEager.jpg?t=12

 

*with Virginia Grey in 1939* - Lana must have been a lot of fun. Some of

her expressions break me up.

lana-turner-virginia-grey-1939.jpg

 

lana-turner7.jpg

 

lana-turner8.jpg

 

lana-turner9.jpg

 

Love this one...

lana-turner15.jpg

 

lana-turnerSMALL.jpg

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Marriage is a Private Affair - I hope TCM shows this, I've never seen it.

 

It's on in 45 minutes, Silly Goose! You better get home and set your recorder!

 

Lovely photos, as always. I would have never known it was Lana in quite a few of them.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> Marriage is a Private Affair - I hope TCM shows this, I've never seen it.

>

> It's on in 45 minutes, Silly Goose! You better get home and set your recorder!

>

 

Really?! As usual, I'm out of it. Thank you. I will try to get home to record it.

 

What weird timing.

 

> Lovely photos, as always. I would have never known it was Lana in quite a few of them.

 

Glad you like them. I like her smiling, best, and in the 1940s. It's actually not

that easy for me to find pictures of her that I haven't seen and posted already. I just

stumbled onto a stash of them.

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Now look at what I learned when I turned on "Marriage is a Private Affair" to record...FRANCES GIFFORD is in this film. A double plus for me: Lana AND Frances. So Frances and Hodiak (sans mustache) worked together before "The Arnelo Affair." Interesting trivia to add to my cobwebbed mind.

 

Lana's quite a chameleon. Her looks seem to change from pix to pix. Soft and supple and then glammed with angles. Lana. Yeah.

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I missed the first few minutes of *Marriage is a Private Affair* but I saw about half an hour before I had to go back to work. This is the only time I've seen her with her long, blonde hair. How stunning. I wish she'd never cut it. She's gorgeous here. And in her bunny-rabbity best. How the men must have gasped when they saw her wearing nothing but an apron over a swimsuit. If this was made during the war, I wonder if it helped speed things up. :D

 

You have to admit Hollywood produced things not seen anywhere else on planet earth at the time.

 

Cute movie, and I can believe Lana having a hard time settling down to marriage and a baby.

 

I don't think I ever saw Hugh Marlowe so young.

 

Frances looked stunning, too, CinemAva. So chic. And I bet she was just in her early twenties yet so poised. Those ladies could knock any of them today off the block.

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THAT VOICE...THAT FACE

 

I had to work on a PowerPoint presentation during TCM's Hedy Lamarr screenings. I was not fa-cing the tv but I could hear the movie while I worked. I gotta tell ya...Charles Boyer's voice was driving me crazy. He could have said anything: "Would you like to dance?" "When can I see you again?" "Hey, I need cream in my coffee." All I could hear was this low French-accented growl as his voice came from deep within his chest. Hmmm, deee-vine! (Oh please yes, let's invite him to Provence next summer). Then when Hedy Lamarr spoke at any length I had to get up from my computer and dash over to the television set to look at her. By jove, that face. I don't even know WHAT she was saying many times. I was just staring. (And as her career continued, she looked even better than she did here).

 

So now, it's eight in the morning and must dash around like crazy to get the work I should have done last nite...done by ten. (May I give an honorable mention to Gene Lockhart who did a

great job in this film).

 

LANA

 

"I missed the first few minutes of 'Marriage is a Private Affair' but I saw about half an hour before I had to go back to work. This is the only time I've seen her with her long, blonde hair. How stunning. I wish she'd never cut it. She's gorgeous here. And in her bunny-rabbity best. How the men must have gasped when they saw her wearing nothing but an apron over a swimsuit. If this was made during the war, I wonder if it helped speed things up." :D

 

Ha ha.

 

To answer this thread?s original title question: I do.

 

And, ?I do? or not ?do? is the core question in 1944?s ?MARRIAGE IS A PRIVATE AFFAIR? starring John Hodiak, Frances Gifford, James Craig and the belle of the 1940?s M-G-M ball, luscious Lana Turner.

 

I don?t know this movie, but as it unfolded I knew what would happen. After all, it?s M-G-M. You know the old saw: boy-meets-girl, boy-loses-girl, boy gets girl. HAPPILY EVER AFTER. But surprisingly ?...PRIVATE AFFAIR? took a different path towards its inexorably inevitable ending. And the traveller here is not ?Boy?, but ?Girl.? And boy, what a girl: LANA.

 

Lana?s gorgeous in this film and in this stage of her career. Will this make sense if I say Lana has two faces in one? She still has a hint of the cherubic face she came to Hollywood with. The baby

fat is disappearing and her now blonde hair cascades past her shoulders. I agree with you Miss G., she looks fantastic with the long hair. Lana?s a vivacious confection with lots of personality.

 

This is her story all the way, and I thought she was ably up to the task. In fact, what made this movie fascinating to me, was the question about whether she wanted to marry or not. That?s not usually the question movies asked their heroines in the ?Golden Age of Hollywood.? Yes, does she love him...or doesn?t she, is the question most oft asked; but 'do I want to marry or not?? That does not sound familiar to me for most movies back then. And that piqued my interest as did seeing Frances Gifford's name in the credits, (I'm about to say something heretical here...but more on her later).

 

As Lana?s voice-over starts the movie at her wedding, I smiled thinking of Joan Bennett getting married in ?Secret Beyond the Door." I watched Lana struggle with her self-doubt throughout the entire movie. Her character didn?t know herself, who she was. She wanted to figure herself out first. (I believe her character was nineteen years old...and nineteen in the forties is a far cry from

a nine-teen year old girl today). And for THAT she was deemed selfish. Hmmmm...where IS this movie going. I'm going to stick around and see. But for now...I must dash off and get this Power Point presentation, collated and handed out.

 

Oooooh....all b'cuz I went to the Casbah last night. << (( Sigh! )) >>

 

To be continued...

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CinemAVA in Lana's house! How terrific! Gotta light?

 

> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> THAT VOICE...THAT FACE

>

> I had to work on a PowerPoint presentation during TCM's Hedy Lamarr screenings. I was not fa-cing the tv but I could hear the movie while I worked. I gotta tell ya...Charles Boyer's voice was driving me crazy. He could have said anything: "Would you like to dance?" "When can I see you again?" "Hey, I need cream in my coffee." All I could hear was this low French-accented growl as his voice came from deep within his chest. Hmmm, deee-vine! (Oh please yes, let's invite him to Provence next summer). Then when Hedy Lamarr spoke at any length I had to get up from my computer and dash over to the television set to look at her. By jove, that face. I don't even know WHAT she was saying many times. I was just staring. (And as her career continued, she looked even better than she did here).

>

 

oh now you did it, opened the gate for me to GUSH uninhibitedly about one of my tippy top, very FAVORITE movies of all time...*Algiers*. I can't say enough about how perfect an example I think it is of romantic escapism...Hollywood style. Yes, yes I know and have seen the French original, *Pepe le Moko*, and can find no fault in Gabin's realistically fatalistic king of the casbah. And the beauty of the original film, some shots having been wholesale cribbed into the remake not to mention the surrounding shot-for-shot replications, testify to its probably superiority. But give me Boyer and Lamarr...and Gene Lockhart and Joe Calleia and Alan Hale, plus a host of other great, weird Hollyood faces. Nothing really compares to the Hollywood talent pool at this time....half of Europe's own were there at this time, so making American remakes was easier and more logical then than now.

 

And I think they did it superbly, and better with the ending. The ENDING sends me down a river of tears no matter how often I see it.

 

> So now, it's eight in the morning and must dash around like crazy to get the work I should have done last nite...done by ten. (May I give an honorable mention to Gene Lockhart who did a

> great job in this film).

>

 

He sure did....was there ever anything so treacherous and double faced....and cringing when caught like a mouse by the cat, Pepe, who toys with Regus' cowardice to the end. He must have been crazy to pull a stunt like that on a man like Pepe in his own world. Regus' only hope would have been to get the heck out of Dodge and from Pepe's reach. But no....

 

 

 

> LANA

>

> To answer this thread?s original title question: I do.

>

 

I'm so glad, c'mAva. I wasn't sure what you thought of her. I know she's not in the acting league of the other divas and bombshells, bless her. And that can get on lots of people's nerves. I just love her softness and beauty in this period.

 

> And, ?I do? or not ?do? is the core question in 1944?s ?MARRIAGE IS A PRIVATE AFFAIR? starring John Hodiak, Frances Gifford, James Craig and the belle of the 1940?s M-G-M ball, luscious Lana Turner.

>

 

Perfectly put!

 

> I don?t know this movie, but as it unfolded I knew what would happen. After all, it?s M-G-M. You know the old saw: boy-meets-girl, boy-loses-girl, boy gets girl. HAPPILY EVER AFTER. But surprisingly ?...PRIVATE AFFAIR? took a different path towards its inexorably inevitable ending. And the traveller here is not ?Boy?, but ?Girl.? And boy, what a girl: LANA.

>

> Lana?s gorgeous in this film and in this stage of her career. Will this make sense if I say Lana has two faces in one? She still has a hint of the cherubic face she came to Hollywood with. The baby

> fat is disappearing and her now blonde hair cascades past her shoulders. I agree with you Miss G., she looks fantastic with the long hair. Lana?s a vivacious confection with lots of personality.

>

 

Sharp call on her subtle transformation. She's using her eyes to look more femme fatale than innocent ingenue by this point. And what eyes to use. the baby talk is there in the first part of the movie, but it subsides and the "knowing" looks become more frequent.

 

> This is her story all the way, and I thought she was ably up to the task. In fact, what made this movie fascinating to me, was the question about whether she wanted to marry or not. That?s not usually the question movies asked their heroines in the ?Golden Age of Hollywood.? Yes, does she love him...or doesn?t she, is the question most oft asked; but 'do I want to marry or not?? That does not sound familiar to me for most movies back then. And that piqued my interest as did seeing Frances Gifford's name in the credits, (I'm about to say something heretical here...but more on her later).

>

 

I hope to read more on Frances later! Please do come back on that. I thought her role intriguing and I almost felt sorry for her, almost.

 

But I too was surprised that they of all studios were showing a young war bride not as idealistic about marriage as most. Her background was also dubious in moral terms, with Mrs. Thurston Howell the III playing one of the most shallow, brittle mothers ever. She was ironically, the serial-marrying Lana herself would become.

 

It's also surprising that the movie presents three women who approach or learn to approach relationships with men on purely self serving grounds...and not really out of necessity but of vanity. They aren't any of them poor looking for security, they're looking for FUN, and while Frances chooses to marry once and play the field, the mother of Lana chooses to discard husbands Mae West style ("use well before shaking"). Both women get caught by their own webs. Frances' fall is sad and leads to a tragedy that would have made for an interesting separate movie.

 

Lana is in the middle, she is attracted to the real, warm world of Hodiak and his folks, but it's a strange world to her and it's hard for her to shake her vain and self-serving point of view, inherited from her mother and friends like Cissy (Frances).

 

> As Lana?s voice-over starts the movie at her wedding, I smiled thinking of Joan Bennett getting married in ?Secret Beyond the Door." I watched Lana struggle with her self-doubt throughout the entire movie. Her character didn?t know herself, who she was. She wanted to figure herself out first. (I believe her character was nineteen years old...and nineteen in the forties is a far cry from

> a nine-teen year old girl today). And for THAT she was deemed selfish. Hmmmm...where IS this movie going. I'm going to stick around and see. But for now...I must dash off and get this Power Point presentation, collated and handed out.

>

 

Well I'm waiting with bated expectations for more. I missed the start so I didn't hear the voice over. I came in during the honeymoon in Vermont.

 

Please return when you can with more on this somewhat unexpected film. :)

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Oct 22, 2010 9:05 AM

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"I'm so glad, c'mAva. I wasn't sure what you thought of her. I know she's not in the acting league of the other divas and bombshells, bless her. And that can get on lots of people's nerves. I just love her softness and beauty in this period." - <<< (( Miss Goddess )) >>>

 

There's our girl, Lana. She's in "No Life of Her Own. I love over-the-top melodramas...women's pictures. The dialogue so arch, her clothes so tailored... the very pointed conversation between wife and mistress - so "Hollywood-sophisticated." The overly joyous party, going louder and partier than a normal party would be. Whoa, there's Jean Hagen talking normal and not being a victim. Louis Calhern being a good guy.

 

I like this kind of sudsy romance stuff.

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