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Alfred Hitchcock's VERTIGO


MissGoddess
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It's probably the most complex role of his career, and he had a few. Scottie, with his fears, his obsessions and repeated tragedies, is the character of a lifetime. Hitchcock made more than one masterpiece, but *Vertigo* stands in a class all its own.

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> {quote:title=theladyeve wrote:}{quote}

> It's probably the most complex role of his career, and he had a few. Scottie, with his fears, his obsessions and repeated tragedies, is the character of a lifetime. Hitchcock made more than one masterpiece, but *Vertigo* stands in a class all its own.

 

I think you're absolutely right, some of the characters he played in the Anthony Mann westerns were complicated and conflicted, but came nowhere near the massive neuroses of Scottie, and his neverending obsession with "Madeline".

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> {quote:title=theladyeve wrote:}{quote}

> And his work with John Ford was interesting, too...but I think Hitchcock was the one who truly put him to the test with *Vertigo* - and he nailed it...

 

And I don't think that he and Ford made enough movies together, although they certainly made at least one very good one. But you're right - even that doesn't come close to equaling the impact of Vertigo, imho.

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According to Memo from David O. Selznick, Hitchcock was very interested in working with Margaret Sullavan. But it didn't happen. But he was able to work with James Stewart, one of her closest friends. Each film Hitchcock made with Stewart is special. I do like Hitchcock films with Cary Grant in it. But I didn't like To Catch A Thief that much.

 

I think it was Samuel Taylor who recommended Ernest Lehman to Hitchcock. Samuel taylor and Ernest Lehman worked together in Billy Wilder's Sabrina (1954).

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  • 3 years later...

With me, it's the soundtrack. Quiet music with everyday sounds like footsteps, cars passing, ships in the distance.. it's as if you can hear the very air itself; cars rusting; grass growing. This is my favorite part of the movie. Hitchcock's movie scores are perfect too; this one, anyway. You can watch this movie with your eyes closed...

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