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ROBERT RYAN - The Real Quiet Man


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As luck goes I turned on "Drum Beat" with Alan Ladd yesterday and who should show up? Robert Keith. He had a speaking role in that one.

 

Never thought much of Aldo Ray one way or another. Knew him but that is about it but he was terrific here. I love the way Ryan hated Ray being right all the time. Ray couldn't explain it but I guess some experience gives you things you can feel more than know.

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> {quote:title=movieman1957 wrote:}{quote}

> As luck goes I turned on "Drum Beat" with Alan Ladd yesterday and who should show up? Robert Keith. He had a speaking role in that one.

>

 

Is that a western, Chris?

 

> Never thought much of Aldo Ray one way or another. Knew him but that is about it but he was terrific here. I love the way Ryan hated Ray being right all the time. Ray couldn't explain it but I guess some experience gives you things you can feel more than know.

 

SPOILER!

 

Oh yes! That was really cool. He (Aldo Ray) said he didn't need to see the enemy, he

could just sense when they were around and he did. And after Ray shot those soldiers up on

the hill who pretended to be Americans, Ryan really flipped. "But you couldn't see their faces,

how could you know?" And then Ryan said, disgustedly, "It takes guys like you to win wars."

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"Drum Beat" is one of Alan Ladd's better film after he left Paramount. It's based on a true incident in 1873 in No. Ca. and Oregon. The Modoc Indian Wars. Ladd play an actual person named Johnny McKay who was a civilian scout for the Army and using his new name for the first time is Charles Bronson as "Captain Jack" another actual figure as leader of the Modoc Indians. Delmer Daves directed. maybe not to factual but an little known incident that had never been told before....

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Thanks, Fred. I think I may have seen parts of it, I didn't realize Delmer Daves directed. I'll have to pay more attention next time.

 

Meanwhile, here is the chiselled Mr. Russell:

 

lawman.JPG

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I have to see Drum Beat! Thanks for the info fredb and movieman!

 

I am absolutely fascinated with Captain Jack. I remember reading his story somewhere and thought it one of the saddest I had ever read.

 

Sorry, Back to RR..... :)

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> {quote:title=CineMaven wrote:}{quote}

> What a foolish young girl I was. I used to watch "LAWMAN" for Peter Brown...

> when the silver-templed, chiselled jawed Mr. Russell was staring me right

> in the face all along.

>

> < Sigh! >

 

Yes, if I could just remember to put him in the right thread! Oy, was I out of it!

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  • 3 weeks later...

_*The Naked Spur*_

 

is a great title for this movie. Why? It's easy to see the use of spurs as a prop throughout the film. The way Mann uses them for effect is fascinating in itself. However, I think the "naked spur" is a metaphor here for the main action of the film, which has to do with three men's attempt to bring in an outlaw for reward money. 'Spurred' on by their naked psychological need, hatred, and greed, and 'spurred' to make mistakes by the outlaw's never ending psychological battering, they enter into a pact together to bring the outlaw, Ben Vandergroat, to justice and split the money.

 

Unfortunately, the outlaw in question will not be taken easily. He is smiling, a man you want to like. He is not just a slippery fellow, he is a dangerous, thoughtful and persuasive one. He is a man who, like a germ, infects the three other men with mistrust - not of him, but of each other, and ultimately of their own abilities. He 'spurs' them, happily poking and digging into each man's psyche until he hits a nerve, in order to read his enemies better. He will manage to end two men's lives before making his final getaway. He will also spur one man to greater and greater feats of heroism, while driving him almost mad with hatred.

 

In the end, because of Ben's goading, our lone "hero", nicknamed 'Howie' by Ben (could there be a more ineffectual name?), will call into question everything he ever thought was true and everything he ever believed about himself or about life. Finally, He will use those 'spurs' to come around full circle until he is actually healed of his affliction - his deep seated need to bring Ben Vandergroat in.

 

 

Photobucket

 

 

Photobucket

 

 

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That was excellent, Jackie! I really didn't make the connection with spur. That's terrific. There really is a lot of spurring going on in The Naked Spur. The interractions with others help to create feelings which then spur actions. Each of the characters not named "Ben Vandergroat" (Robert Ryan) step outside of themselves to help someone else.

 

However, I think the "naked spur" is a metaphor here for the main action of the film, which has to do with three men's attempt to bring in an outlaw for reward money. 'Spurred' on by their naked psychological need, hatred, and greed, and 'spurred' to make mistakes by the outlaw's never ending psychological battering, they enter into a pact together to bring the outlaw, Ben Vandergroat, to justice and split the money.

 

That was perfectly put. Very nicely done. I think of The Naked Spur as Anthony Mann's The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

 

Unfortunately, the outlaw in question will not be taken easily. He is smiling, a man you want to like. He is not just a slippery fellow, he is a dangerous, thoughtful and persuasive one. He is a man who, like a germ, infects the three other men with mistrust - not of him, but of each other, and ultimately of their own abilities. He 'spurs' them, happily poking and digging into each man's psyche until he hits a nerve, in order to read his enemies better. He will manage to end two men's lives before making his final getaway. He will also spur one man to greater and greater feats of heroism, while driving him almost mad with hatred.

 

Awesome, awesome, awesome! That is dead-on. Ben is very intelligent. He can size up people, which is a skill in itself. And he looks to use it to his great advantage. What makes his words powerful are that they are true. As you wisely have said, that's the "naked" in the title. He's stripping each person in front of the others. He's exposing them.

 

In the end, because of Ben's goading, our lone "hero", nicknamed 'Howie' by Ben (could there be a more ineffectual name?), will call into question everything he ever thought was true and everything he ever believed about himself or about life. Finally, He will use those 'spurs' to come around full circle until he is actually healed of his affliction - his deep seated need to bring Ben Vandergroat in.

 

I believe Ben helps Kemp (James Stewart) find himself. He's been lost ever since his wife stuck a knife in his back. (Was he married to Miss G? :P ) That's where his anger and hate stem from. This is the root of his obsession, ala Vertigo. I love the ending because he finally breaks down. He's "naked," at that very point.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> That was excellent, Jackie! I really didn't make the connection with spur. That's terrific. There really is a lot of spurring going on in The Naked Spur. The interractions with others help to create feelings which then spur actions. Each of the characters not named "Ben Vandergroat" (Robert Ryan) step outside of themselves to help someone else.

 

Now see, I forgot that! That is very important.... These men (and woman) each step up to the plate and join in to help each other. For Roy and Jesse, this is the starting point.... are they going to be OK? Will they follow through, or they just out for themselves? They are both a bit questionable at the get go, but we soon see that they are trustworthy companions as they tackle finding and capturing Vandergroat. Only later, under Ben's searching pressure do they start to lose their way.

 

> That was perfectly put. Very nicely done. I think of The Naked Spur as Anthony Mann's The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

 

I can see that... it's a test or trial, just as in Treasure. What does it take to make a man lose his soul? Not much, it seems.

 

> Awesome, awesome, awesome! That is dead-on. Ben is very intelligent. He can size up people, which is a skill in itself. And he looks to use it to his great advantage. What makes his words powerful are that they are true. As you wisely have said, that's the "naked" in the title. He's stripping each person in front of the others. He's exposing them.

 

Now that's perfect. i wish I had said that! I kept thinking that I might do exactly as Ben did in order to get away, at least up to a point. But Ben was a sadist. I'd love to see this movie made from the exact opposite viewpoint. Innocent but smart man uses his wits to out-maneuver his captors. Has that been done already? Oh, yeah! I think it was called *Man of the West.*...

 

> I believe Ben helps Kemp (James Stewart) find himself. He's been lost ever since his wife stuck a knife in his back. (Was he married to Miss G? :P ) That's where his anger and hate stem from. This is the root of his obsession, ala Vertigo.

 

I lost the plot point of what happened to Kemp's wife.... I thought for a few minutes towards the last third of the movie that it was actually Ben who led her astray. I agree that Ben helps Kemp to find himself... they are definitely deeply connected, just like Ethan and Scar.... however, the goading alone doesn't effect the change. The other men didn't change or changed for the worse through Ben's poking around. There is something in Kemp that leads him to change, and something that Lina gives him that helps him to accept himself as a man.

 

The scene that really made me think this was a different kind of a movie was the scene where Ben says to Kemp, "Go on, murder me. But if your gonna do it, don't call it something else." That is the most honest point in the film for Ben.. I think he actually likes Kemp and knows that Kemp's honor would kick in....and it did, eventually.... You can see that he actually thinks Kemp as a better man than he, on pretty much any level. That was probably an eye opener for Ben. But then, being a good man doesn't save your life. He reverts to type.

 

I also liked the next scene right after, where Kemp then forces Ben to draw and Ben is too scared to do it. He does value himself highly and his own life. But life in general? We come to find out that it is not his style to shoot a man in a draw, but to do it behind his back.

 

>I love the ending because he finally breaks down. He's "naked," at that very point.

 

This was a super, super performance by Jimmy Stewart. There were none of the "Jimmy-isms" that have started to bug me lately. That section where he is holding onto that rope, holding onto all that hate, pulling it in to him....he was just incredible. He was going to show her how horrible he could be. When he finally broke down like that, asking her why, why....I bawled like a baby.

 

I have to mention Janet Leigh in this one. I have now seen two of her movies that I really, really liked (aside from the iconic Psycho). I never really enjoyed her performances before, but I have to say that she was excellent here ( and in Act of Violence).

 

Everyone in the cast was great, Millard Mitchell especially, and I loved Ralph Meeker's character. I thought Robert Ryan was exceptional. But the script is what was truly great in this one. To tell you the truth, aside from the fact that Jimmy was constantly climbing up up up a rock, or falling over the edge of one, I didn't notice the direction at all. It was probably the most beautiful Mann film I've seen, and I loved the landscape. I also liked the fact, that throughout the film there was no altering of the sky or graying of the landscape.... This film was to take place all internally with sunny skies all the time.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jul 15, 2010 10:00 PM

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Good evening, Naked Spur :D -- Now see, I forgot that! That is very important.... These men (and woman) each step up to the plate and join in to help each other.

 

That's right. There is unselfishness with all of them but Ben. They all (but Ben) risk their lives for someone else.

 

For Roy and Jesse, this is the starting point.... are they going to be OK? Will they follow through, or they just out for themselves? They are both a bit questionable at the get go, but we soon see that they are trustworthy companions as they tackle finding and capturing Vandergroat. Only later, under Ben's searching pressure do they start to lose their way.

 

You've got it, girl. When they think self, they lose their way. When Roy (Ralph Meeker) selfishly ambushes the indians, he nearly kills the rest of 'em. And we see what happens to Jesse (Millard Mitchell) when he thinks self.

 

I can see that... it's a test or trial, just as in Treasure. What does it take to make a man lose his soul? Not much, it seems.

 

Money! It's not just about trust, but who you trust. The Treasure of Sierra Madre is about obsession which leads to paranoia..

 

Now that's perfect. i wish I had said that! I kept thinking that I might do exactly as Ben did in order to get away, at least up to a point. But Ben was a sadist. I'd love to see this movie made from the exact opposite viewpoint. Innocent but smart man uses his wits to out-maneuver his captors. Has that been done already? Oh, yeah! I think it was called Man of the West....

 

It's Bugs Bunny!

 

I lost the plot point of what happened to Kemp's wife.... I thought for a few minutes towards the last third of the movie that it was actually Ben who led her astray.

 

Oh, yeah? That would have been interesting. But it's better it wasn't him.

 

I agree that Ben helps Kemp to find himself... they are definitely deeply connected, just like Ethan and Scar.... however, the goading alone doesn't effect the change. The other men didn't change or changed for the worse through Ben's poking around. There is something in Kemp that leads him to change, and something that Lina gives him that helps him to accept himself as a man.

 

There is good and bad in all of us, it's just a matter of which wins out, and with what. Ben was the "Devil," looking to prey on the weaknesses of each person.

 

The scene that really made me think this was a different kind of a movie was the scene where Ben says to Kemp, "Go on, murder me. But if your gonna do it, don't call it something else." That is the most honest point in the film for Ben.

 

That's a fantastic line. I'm glad you pointed it out.

 

I think he actually likes Kemp and knows that Kemp's honor would kick in....and it did, eventually.

 

Ben knows Kemp is a decent guy. He couldn't just shoot him dead, especially not in front of a "jury." He was again playing to a "weakness."

 

You can see that he actually thinks Kemp as a better man than he, on pretty much any level. That was probably an eye opener for Ben. But then, being a good man doesn't save your life. He reverts to type.

 

Does he think he's a better man or a "weaker" man? In this instance, the two are the same, actually.

 

I also liked the next scene right after, where Kemp then forces Ben to draw and Ben is too scared to do it. He does value himself highly and his own life. But life in general? We come to find out that it is not his style to shoot a man in a draw, but to do it behind his back.

 

I actually think the reason Ben didn't draw is because he knew Kemp was faster. You see, Ben also knows his own weaknesses. This tells me he isn't a narcissist. He's self-aware.

 

This was a super, super performance by Jimmy Stewart. There were none of the "Jimmy-isms" that have started to bug me lately. That section where he is holding onto that rope, holding onto all that hate, pulling it in to him....he was just incredible. He was going to show her how horrible he could be. When he finally broke down like that, asking her why, why....I bawled like a baby.

 

Wonderful. This is basically Jimmy's first "Vertigo." He even has the nightmare. He's been driven crazy by a woman, too. Lina (Janet Leigh) restores his faith in woman. I like that her last name is "Patch," too. She heals those wounds. She's doing it throughout the film.

 

I have to mention Janet Leigh in this one. I have now seen two of her movies that I really, really liked (aside from the iconic Psycho). I never really enjoyed her performances before, but I have to say that she was excellent here ( and in Act of Violence).

 

I thought she was great, too. I really like Janet. I have seen most of her "masculine" film roles and I've liked her in all of them. Love her in Psycho and The Manchurian Candidate.

 

Everyone in the cast was great,

 

Definitely.

 

Millard Mitchell especially, and I loved Ralph Meeker's character.

 

I really enjoyed Millard's performance, this time around. He was superb. And after seeing Kiss Me Deadly, I was into Ralph.

 

But the script is what was truly great in this one. To tell you the truth, aside from the fact that Jimmy was constantly climbing up up up a rock, or falling over the edge of one, I didn't notice the direction at all. It was probably the most beautiful Mann film I've seen, and I loved the landscape. I also liked the fact, that throughout the film there was no altering of the sky or graying of the landscape.... This film was to take place all internally with sunny skies all the time.

 

That's an excellent point about the direction. It does feel rather "seamless." You seem to have connected with the male emotion that's found in Mann's westerns. I'm very impressed.

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"Unfortunately, the outlaw in question will not be taken easily. He is smiling, a man you want to like. He is not just a slippery fellow, he is a dangerous, thoughtful and persuasive one. He is a man who, like a germ, infects the three other men with mistrust - not of him, but of each other, and ultimately of their own abilities. He 'spurs' them, happily poking and digging into each man's psyche until he hits a nerve, in order to read his enemies better. He will manage to end two men's lives before making his final getaway. He will also spur one man to greater and greater feats of heroism, while driving him almost mad with hatred."

 

WoW!!! After reading this Jackaaaaaaaaaay, I clearly see that others here are pitiable pathetic pretenders to the throne. But this character you describe of Robert Ryan's seems to be the real deal. I had a chance to get the full monty of "The Naked Spur" two weeks ago at the Film Forum's Anthony Mann retrospective, but I blew it. Reading the posts here will be the next best thing to seeing Mann's film. As we all know from Movies 101...without a good villain, there can't be a very good hero. And Robert Ryan is just the guy who can do it.

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You have got to see it sometime, Maven.

 

Ryan is so charming, so full of snake oil..... the whole time he's doing you dirt, he's smiling and laughing..... and even you as the audience begin to doubt that he is as evil as they say! it's a great performance, and I can't imagine any other actor who could have played that role opposite Jimmy Stewart. I totally forgot they were acting. Neither one fell back on any tricks or mannerisms. I still feel the characters are real.

 

FrankGrimes was right when he said the film was seamless. It doesn't feel like Mann, there is no manipulation of the picture at all as far as I can tell. So, except for the themes, it is not "arty". It's really beautiful, sort of man against nature, but really man against his OWN nature, if you get my meaning.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

 

> *You've got it, girl. When they think self, they lose their way. When Roy (Ralph Meeker) selfishly ambushes the indians, he nearly kills the rest of 'em. And we see what happens to Jesse (Millard Mitchell) when he thinks self.*

 

I really loooooved Ralph Meeker. He was so brash and kind of headstrong stupid. And yet, he had a smile that made him quite irresistible. I liked him. He was dangerous, but good-natured. He's a bit of a twin to Ryan's character, isn't he? He'd been getting by with a quick smile for years, I feel. He never even apologizes for nearly killing them all. I totally see him as a soldier, with a girl in every town.... and yet, he had a good-heartedness that made you like him, his willingness to help just for the fun of it was really charming. For me, that was one of the hardest things to watch - his headlong dive into the deep so to speak. It was such a waste of a man.

 

> Money! It's not just about trust, but who you trust.

 

Now why did Millard Mitchell trust Ben? DId he think he could do it all? Get the money and handle Ben? Very, very sad. His lines at the end were so moving, because he saw his own folly, and he knew he had only himself to blame.

 

 

> I lost the plot point of what happened to Kemp's wife.... I thought for a few minutes towards the last third of the movie that it was actually Ben who led her astray.

 

> *Oh, yeah? That would have been interesting. But it's better it wasn't him.*

 

Much better. But those actors made you see that parallel.

 

>

> Ben knows Kemp is a decent guy. He couldn't just shoot him dead, especially not in front of a "jury." He was again playing to a "weakness."

> Does he think he's a better man or a "weaker" man? In this instance, the two are the same, actually.

 

Both! exactly. Better doesn't count as long as you are alive and the other guy is dead. Being the worse man is sometimes better.

 

> I also liked the next scene right after, where Kemp then forces Ben to draw and Ben is too scared to do it. He does value himself highly and his own life. But life in general? We come to find out that it is not his style to shoot a man in a draw, but to do it behind his back.

>

> I actually think the reason Ben didn't draw is because he knew Kemp was faster. You see, Ben also knows his own weaknesses. This tells me he isn't a narcissist. He's self-aware.

 

It made him very human.... and I liked him for acknowledging that part of himself. I think this is why I liked him so much in this movie...he isn't all bad. Just mostly.

 

 

> Wonderful. This is basically Jimmy's first "Vertigo." He even has the nightmare. He's been driven crazy by a woman, too. Lina (Janet Leigh) restores his faith in woman. I like that her last name is "Patch," too. She heals those wounds. She's doing it throughout the film.

 

Patch! Very good. I never noticed. I thought she was like a patchwork girl - she has no home, just a patchwork of [past experiences.

 

> I thought she was great, too. I really like Janet. I have seen most of her "masculine" film roles and I've liked her in all of them. Love her in Psycho and The Manchurian Candidate.

 

I still haven't seen all of The Manchurian Candidate. I didn't even know she was in it.

 

I think she is good in Touch of Evil, but her character is a bit cartoony for my liking. "I'm gonna tell my husband on you".

 

> Millard Mitchell especially, and I loved Ralph Meeker's character.

>

> I really enjoyed Millard's performance, this time around. He was superb. And after seeing Kiss Me Deadly, I was into Ralph.

 

I never knew Millard Mitchell had a performance like that in him. I am used to seeing him in Singing in the Rain as R.F. Simpson, the blowhard studio head.

 

 

> That's an excellent point about the direction. It does feel rather "seamless." You seem to have connected with the male emotion that's found in Mann's westerns. I'm very impressed.

 

You always have to draw the line - Male - Female... interesting.

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I never had the impression that Ryan was anything but evil. What kept Leigh with him is beyond me but she loved him. She sure rubbed his shoulders enough.

 

The "partnership" was very interesting. It's tough trying to reach a common goal when you can't trust the people who are trying to get there with you.

 

Mitchell was terrific. I think this was one of the first films I saw him in. When you compare it to "The Gunfighter" and "Singing In The Rain" and "My Six Convicts" it is quite remarkable to see his range of characters.

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He is pretty evil by the end. But he was not deluded about himself. What would happen if someone held a mirror up to his foibles? Would he care? Probably not.

 

Would he do all these things if he were not trying to escape? I don't know. For Ben, the end justifies the means.

 

I guess what I'm saying is, he did a couple of good things -he saved Lina... albeit to cater to his every need.... and he shows men what they really are... a mirror, of sorts.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Jul 16, 2010 11:05 AM

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

> > Great film discussion everyone, as always

>

> Thank you. I look forward to your thoughts. I don't know where Naked Spur ranks in your list of Ryan performances... ?

 

From those I've seen often or recently enough to rank,

his performance here is not a big favorite only because I'm

not as into his baddies as I am into his complex protagonists.

 

So this is my ranking, based on how I feel about his

character, not the actual strength or merit of the performance:

 

1. On Dangerous Ground

2. Lonelyhearts

3. The Woman on the Beach

4. The Set-Up

5. The Wild Bunch

6. Men in War

7. Act of Violence

8. Back From Eternity

9. The Professionals

10. Clash by Night

11. About Mrs Leslie

12. Odds Against Tomorrow

13. The Naked Spur

14. Beware, My Lovely

15. Bad Day at Black Rock

16. Crossfire

17. The Tall Men

18. The Proud Ones

19. Day of the Outlaw

20. Berlin Express

21. The Iceman Cometh

22. Ice Palace

23. The House of Bamboo

24. Tender Comrade

 

I need to see or revisit Caught, Flying Leathernecks, The Canadians, The Woman on Pier 13, The Boy with Green Hair, Return of the Bad Men, and The Secret Fury.

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I'm late to the party but I just wanted to say I re-read your comments Jackie

and I definitely have to watch the film again with them in mind. You really

made some connections that I never picked up and have increased my

admiration for the film. I never understood the title either, except I took it

to literally refer to the spur Stewart carried.

 

You are brilliant, ma'am!

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I wish you'd tell my husband I was brilliant, he'd be quite surprised to find it out...

 

I really liked the movie. I found some things in it that moved me, so it was easy to write about it.

 

I feel like I have to go back and look again now, my mind is blank after our little vacation this weekend. Maybe by posting some caps, I can re-connect to the discussion.

 

 

I loved your list (Ha! I almost wrote lust.... :D). I get what you say about Ryan performances that you feel... I can totally see where you are coming from with your choices. The only one I thought was strange was *Odds Against Tomorrow* being higher up than *The Naked Spur*. Maybe it is a deeper performance, I'd have to go back and watch it again. Anyway, I really enjoyed seeing your picks, and figuring out why they were in the order that they were in.

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> I feel like I have to go back and look again now, my mind is blank after our little vacation this weekend. Maybe by posting some caps, I can re-connect to the discussion.

>

 

I'd love to see some caps of Robbie!

 

>

> I loved your list (Ha! I almost wrote lust.... :D). I get what you say about Ryan performances that you feel... I can totally see where you are coming from with your choices. The only one I thought was strange was *Odds Against Tomorrow* being higher up than *The Naked Spur*. Maybe it is a deeper performance, I'd have to go back and watch it again. Anyway, I really enjoyed seeing your picks, and figuring out why they were in the order that they were in.

 

It looks strange to me, that list, because a few films I find uncomfortable to watch are ranked much higher than some I love watching over and over. I was looking purely at the performances which moved me the most.

 

Like *Odds Against Tomorrow* which is a movie I find depressing to say the least. But, for the sake of the scenes with Ryan and Shelley Winters and Gloria Grahame, I bumped it up. I thought he did a great job at displaying "saving graces", that crack in the armor. Also, I felt sorry for him. He was the "angry bigot" but you saw where the anger came from, and it was directed at himself more than anything.

 

Like I said, I really need to watch *The Naked Spur* again in light of this discussion, because Robbie's character entertained me but never moved me especially. I mean, he didn't seem complex and that's what I've come to expect from him (and why I'm not crazy about him in House of Bamboo, he's very "one note" there, to me). You and Mr. Grimes make me think I missed a whole lot and that doesn't surprise me at all.

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> {quote:title=MissGoddess wrote:}{quote}

 

> It looks strange to me, that list, because a few films I find uncomfortable to watch are ranked much higher than some I love watching over and over. I was looking purely at the performances which moved me the most.

> Like *Odds Against Tomorrow* which is a movie I find depressing to say the least. But, for the sake of the scenes with Ryan and Shelley Winters and Gloria Grahame, I bumped it up. I thought he did a great job at displaying "saving graces", that crack in the armor. Also, I felt sorry for him. He was the "angry bigot" but you saw where the anger came from, and it was directed at himself more than anything.

 

I can nderstand that point of view. I do know that when I first started talking to you about Ryan, *Odds Against Tomorrow* was the first film I saw that made me understand what you were talking about. I thought he was pretty sympathetic for a bigot. And nothing like the scary nutjob I thought he was.... :D

 

> Like I said, I really need to watch *The Naked Spur* again in light of this discussion, because Robbie's character entertained me but never moved me especially. I mean, he didn't seem complex and that's what I've come to expect from him (and why I'm not crazy about him in House of Bamboo, he's very "one note" there, to me). You and Mr. Grimes make me think I missed a whole lot and that doesn't surprise me at all.

 

But I don't think you are wrong - I think it is a simple performance, in comparison to the others listed. I think I like his more "spare" performances - like in The Wild Bunch, Act of Violence, or Beware My Lovely. I couldn't abide him in Miss Lonelyhearts, although I can concede that the performance is magnificent. I was drawn to Myrna anyway. I find some of his characters almost too complex for my brain to get around... though House of Bamboo is too simplistic even for me. :D

 

Anyway, when I say I like spare, or simple, that is not a knock - I think he is a wonderful actor and I have liked every part I have seen him in. I never thought he was miscast, and I never thought he gave a bad performance - ever. I just like him pared down to the essential. It' boils down to a matter of style - the differences we have in what we like.

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> I can nderstand that point of view. I do know that when I first started talking to you about Ryan, *Odds Against Tomorrow* was the first film I saw that made me understand what you were talking about. I thought he was pretty sympathetic for a bigot. And nothing like the scary nutjob I thought he was.... :D

>

 

I thought of him that way for years. :D And you know, *The Naked Spur* was one of the reasons...I believe it was the first of his movies I ever saw. AMC used to play it a lot and it's the Anthony Mann film I was exposed to the most early on.

 

>

> But I don't think you are wrong - I think it is a simple performance, in comparison to the others listed. I think I like his more "spare" performances - like in The Wild Bunch, Act of Violence, or Beware My Lovely. I couldn't abide him in Miss Lonelyhearts, although I can concede that the performance is magnificent. I was drawn to Myrna anyway. I find some of his characters almost too complex for my brain to get around... though House of Bamboo is too simplistic even for me. :D

>

 

Yet you made connections between his behavior and the responses to it by the other characters that I never noticed before. I know this will make me enjoy the movie and him even more.

 

House of Bamboo was really like a comic book movie, to me. The good guys vs the bad guys, in kimonos.

 

 

> Anyway, when I say I like spare, or simple, that is not a knock - I think he is a wonderful actor and I have liked every part I have seen him in. I never thought he was miscast, and I never thought he gave a bad performance - ever. I just like him pared down to the essential. It' boils down to a matter of style - the differences we have in what we like.

 

"Pared down to the essentials." I like that! I like that a lot!

 

I think you're right. Pared down to the essentials, RR is muey attractivo! :D

 

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