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shackiet

what we have in common

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my first day here, im so glad i found other people who like old movies. i have no family members or friends who share this same interest, so i thought i was just weird. and i find all u people who love it to. i love to look at the old styles of clothes and homes and how relationships were so different, i kno its just in the movies maybe, but in most of these movies if your man cheated on u, u just sucked it up and faught for your man, and thats what they thought was right, and now days, they get caught they r out, and also i think about how beautiful some of these women were and how there beauty was everything to them, how hard it must have been to get old, its hard enuff on common folk like me. its just makes u think, no matter how pretty or how much money u have, age is something u cant fight. also i want one of those big fancy bedrooms with the fire place and gigantic 4 poster bed. im just in a dream world when i watch these movies, im so glad i found tcm and so many other people who like the old movies like i do. this might all sound crazy to u. but im glad i found a place to discuss old stars and movies. tina

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I'm right with you Tina - I'm one of the only people I know who loves old films, and I was happy to find these boards, where not only are there other old film lovers, but some genuinely intelligent people who offer good conversation. Even though I never lived through it, I'm also jealous of that bygone era where things were not only different, but to me better. Nowadays, the world seems so jaded - in the 30's, 40's, and 50's, life seemed more simple and pleasant.

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I am also joining in the praise of old films. Being able to share the love with others is great. It's nice to be able to watch a film and go WOW!!! without having something blown up or someone killed.

 

I'm not picking on anyone here, but the actors of today have nothing on the actors of yesteryear. (Did I say that right?)

 

Apart from the films that they show on the network, I love the intros by Robert Osbourne. After he's finished I come away feeling I learned something. He's great.

 

One more thing I want to throw out there, last night they showed the Lugosi version of "Dracula", why is it that the majority of fans think that his dracula is the be all and all of vampires? Christopher Lee puts him to shame. Lee had that has that aura about him that let you know you're in trouble, whereas in lugosi's case it's hard to take him seriously. (I like the film though)

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I personally prefer the Louis Jourdan Drac that was done in 3 hrs. for PBS. It was the first time they really showed the sensual side of vampirsm...predating Frank Langella's try at that angle by 7 or 8 years. Remember Halloween will soon be here: as Count Floyd would say: "Scary Stuff! Eh, kids?"

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Welcome Shackiet! As Moviejoe told you, you will find a lot of very intelligent people here who share your interest in the Classics. You will also find people here who can even appreciate the showing of more recent films. And for the most part, the majority of us love TCM, are willing to say so, and are satisfied with the great programming TCM offers us each month. Please enjoy our forums, and write often!

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Let me jump in here too. I love the classics because they have a story to tell. Today's movies are all about effects and shock value. Then they add some shallow plot and rush it to the theater. Another thing I like about movies from 30s and 40s are the sets. I also like the period furniture and clothes and seeing the cars and cities of that era.

 

Ahh...I need to go watch some TCM now.

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Shackiet, I think most of us understand how it is to fall in love with movies made over 70+ years ago--and have nobody to talk about them with! When my friends start in on Brad Pitt, I think to myself, "Give me Gary Cooper." When they go on and on about how beautiful J.Lo is I think of the way Joan Crawford looked in an Adrian gown.

 

Have you considered trying to make "converts" out of your friends & family? My husband is now "one of us," and my youngest son can identify Clark Gable, Jean Harlow and John Barrymore. Not bad for a kid who watched Yu-gi-oh.

 

We are glad you're here!

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(Sorry for the length of this post, but I just had to get on my soap box. . .)

 

Yes, I?m extending my welcome aboard as well! I?m new too, Shakiet, and let me tell you that these boards are fantastic! I understand completely where you are coming from! I?m 21 years old, but years ago I came to realize that I was the victim of a gross injustice: being born in the wrong era. Growing up, the other girls were drooling over the many glossy, flash-in-the-pan poster boys, and I was falling in and out of love with the likes of Tyrone Power, Cary Grant, Gary Cooper, Henry Fonda, Clark Gable?the list goes on. =o) And I realized also that my favorite actresses weren?t anyone on the screen at the time, but rather the likes of Claudette Colbert and Bette Davis and Jean Harlow? actresses I still affectionately term ?my girls?. When I was twelve, I wasn?t so much interested in what was playing on the Disney Channel, as what was showing on AMC. (During it?s golden years, mind you. Remember all those marathons they used to have? Oh, those were fantastic, weren?t they??)

 

Someone earlier asked if we?d ever tried to make ?converts?. Well, yes: one was successful, and one is a work in process. My father thought I was strange for liking anything in black and white (something I can?t understand since he?s not exactly a spring chicken and movies were commonly in black and white while he was growing up in the sixties). Sometimes I would be adamant that he sit down and watch a particular film with me (the movie that changed his attitude towards black and white films was Stalag 17. It?s now one of his favorite of all time) Over the years he has come to never question me when I tell him he has to see a film and I am delighted to report that he has even developed a soft spot to silent films: Charlie Chaplin?s The Kid was playing at a silent movie theater here in LA over the Father?s Day weekend, the two of us had a fabulous time!!

 

Someone else earlier mentioned that movies today are all about shock values, and I have to agree with that sentiment. With some notable exceptions, I simply do not find the same sort of joy with movies today as I do with the films from yesterday. Films really were an art form. Moviemakers did not need to computer generate awesome special effects to keep the audience?s interest? acting and a damn good story were all the special effects the moviegoers needed. And TCM is proof that the moviemakers answered the call brilliantly. (and granted, thankfully, there are moviemakers today who have followed their lead. . .)

 

Classic cinema in an incredible thing as we can instantly be transported back and experience life as people experienced it then. With social-conscious films such as The Best Years of Our Lives, and All Along the Western Front, The Grapes of Wrath (and so many more), history becomes an intimate reality. We can see what people were like, see how they lived, what they thought was funny or sad, and come to understand that just because many decades have passed, and many of these actors have passed on, the undeniable fact is this: we are not so very different at all. Time marches on, but humans are essentially the same, dealing with the same issues we?ve always dealt with, though they may take very different forms.

 

And maybe, just maybe, we can learn a thing or two from them.

 

Okay. I'm off the soap box now . . . =o)

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To littletramplover - You can get on the soapbox anytime - those were very good observations - especially about how we can be "transported" to another era while watching some of these classics. For a time I thought I was the only one out there - I'm glad to see I'm not - I'm very glad to see that there are other people around my age who really love the classics.

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Transporting you to another time and place--that's one of the things that I love the most about movies of any era. I watched MRS. MINIVER the other day on TCM (can't believe I'd never seen it before), and I was surprised at how moved I was by this story of a family in England during the early days of WWII. Of course, I'd heard time and again how brave the English were during the Blitz, but for some reason, when I watched the scene with Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon and their children in their makeshift bomb shelter while the bombs whistled and fell around them, it really hit home. The scene was so beautifully and realistically done that I understood what it must have been like for these people. Just one of many fine scenes in an outstanding film that touched my heart and made me cry.

 

AND the Minivers had one of those great movie bedrooms with big windows and a fireplace! LOVE those!

 

Sandy K

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I want my art deco! I want my all white room! I want tuxes and evening gowns! I want a 39 caddie! I want 12 foot ceilings! Thanks to the classics I can have all this and popcorn too.

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Speaking of art deco, my all time pick for a place from the movies to be transported to would be one of the Fred and Ginger sets. The incredible Night Clubs, and apartments, and just everywhere they went was so over the top with art deco glamour.

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Yes! The sets in TOP HAT and SWING TIME are fantastic! I think TOP HAT is the one with the hotel nightclub that has a Venetian-style canal complete with a white Deco gondola for the guests to ride in. FABulous!

 

Sandy K

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The problem with movies today is that they don't make you care about what happens to the main characters. Some of these films try so hard to have hidden meaning that they just forget how to develop a character and present a simple story. The movie I had the hardest time watching was Vanilla Sky. It had so much symbolism that went way over my head and even if I had gotten it, I wouldn't have cared because none of the characters had any qualities that I was interested in. I hate watching films about screwed up people that never solve any of their problems.

I love classic films because they leave you feeling good about humanity and about yourself as a person. A while back I read an article in the SF Chronicle comparing Ocean's 11 to the Rat Pack. It made the suggestion of making Ocean's 11 with the singers of today, like Eminem in place of Sinatra. I was so disturbed by this and wrote the author about it. There is no way that any actor or singer of today could be compared to performers of the past because they are driven by completely different goals. Classic films are great because they let you enjoy the great things in life and learn from it as well. You all are right when you say today's movies are just about shock value. You can show all the sex, violence and death you want, but it wont mean anything unless the audience cares about the people it's happening to. The films from the 30s and 40s are, I think, the best films made because they had to be creative enough to get past the Hays Code. Having limitations to art can really make people creative in telling a story. Today's filmmakers have every creative possibility at their fingertips but they don't understand how to use them. All they are interested in is showing Tom Cruise in bed with Penelope Cruz.

...

All I know is I can't wait to see the next Matrix! ha! Now Keanu Reeves, there's the next Jimmy Stewart! "Dude, I love you Tracy Lord. You like, have this glow about you."

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LOL - very funny about Keanu Reeves bgrable24. And you're absolutely right about today's films. I get angry myself at some of the crap that Hollywood turns out, and then everyone goes into joyous rapture (even supposed "critics") over these films that are truly garbage - and most of them are just bad rehashes of classic films anyway. Nobody has any originality anymore.

 

And speaking of feel good movies that say a lot about humanity - you have to check out Frank Capra's movies - especially "You Can't Take It With You," "It's a Wonderful Life," and "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town." His movies could make you laugh and cry, and you always walked away feeling good about being alive, and feeling good about people in general. He would always show the "everyman" succeed and be the "hero" by the end of the movie. And regarding "Mr. Deeds" - look at that stupid remake that Adam Sandler did - it's almost sacreligious to take a great film and basically make a mockery of it - many of these remakes wind up decreasing the importance of the original, because they are so bad, people think the original must be that way too. Meanwhile, with a film like "Deeds" for example, the whole message that Capra was trying to convey gets lost, which was that Gary Cooper wasn't "crazy" but simply trying to help his fellow man. That message is not conveyed so well in a remake by Adam Sandler. Sorry to ramble on, but I get so steamed!

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Bgrable, and Moviejoe, I agree with both of you. The movies being produced today, with only a few exceptions, don't even come close to the movies of the Golden Era of film. But what disturbs me even more is that we have become a society that actually supports the garbage we are getting from film makers today. Like so many of the characters that these movies depict today, we as a society no longer "care" about what happens to people. We don't even want to know. Until "we" change, I doubt that movies will. I guess this is why I love to see the old classics, the people who cared for others, the genuine comedy, and the authentic drama.

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"we as a society no longer "care" about what happens to people. We don't even want to know. Until "we" change, I doubt that movies will. I guess this is why I love to see the old classics, the people who cared for others, the genuine comedy, and the authentic drama. "

 

Classicsfan? You have put it beautifully.

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Wow! I just checked out this website for the first time yesterday. Today is my first visit to this board and I am so delighted to know that I am not some weirdo! I have been passionate about films from the 30's to the 50's for years. The cinamatography alone keeps me glued to my set. When I tell others about my love for these films they always seem to imply that I am the oldest 44 year old they've ever known and that I am so out of touch. It is rare that I see movies today that can touch me, entrance me, the way classic films do. Today's movies reflect the shorter attention spans of the Sesame Street generation. They lack elegance, genuine suspense and the marks of true story telling. - Dee

 

 

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Welcome, Dee! You will fit in so nicely with the majority of us here. And, in time you will also be able to determine which posts not to pay much attention to. Do lots of reading on the boards, and keep posting!

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