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October 1st is Film Noir Day on TCM


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If anyone wants to experience some film noir, today is your day at TCM. It's a film noir starter kit for sure.

 

The Asphalt Jungle (John Huston) - 6:00 A.M. EST

Cry Danger (Robert Parrish... not 'The Chief', mind you) - 8:00 A.M. EST

Detour (Edgar G. Ulmer) - 9:30 A.M. EST

Railroaded! (Anthony Mann) - 10:45 A.M. EST

The Threat (Felix Feist) - 12:00 P.M. EST

White Heat (Raoul Walsh) - 1:45 P.M. EST

They Live by Night (Nicholas Ray) - 3:15 P.M. EST

Murder, My Sweet (Edward Dmytryk) - 5:00 P.M. EST

The Narrow Margin (Richard Fleischer) - 6:45 P.M. EST

 

I'm gonna tape Cry Danger and The Threat.

 

You gotta love TCM's sense of humor, since the day is filled with dark, violent tales and then goes to *Gandhi* and King of Kings, which is another Nicholas Ray film that features Robert Ryan as John the Baptist.

 

The Asphalt Jungle

 

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The Narrow Margin

 

nmargin1.jpg

 

 

Murder, My Sweet

 

murdermysweet1.jpg

 

 

They Live by Night

 

theylive1.jpg

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I took notice of this lineup of suspicious characters when I tuned in this morning. I've seen *Cry Danger* , which isn't bad, but I only have a little room on my tape to record *Railroaded* , which I've never watched. Too bad I probably won't have enough space to record *The Threat* as well, another one I've missed.

 

The dark days of October have officially started.

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They Live by Night is one Id like to see

I just rented the Threat VHS with Lady Scarface and the Threat was good good good

Detour, White Heat are keepers already

Murder My Sweet , the 2nd half ruined it for me, it just got too weird for me..Ive seen it two times...

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World Mental Health Day isn't until the 10th, but I had to take mine today. Today's entire scheduling seems to be a stylish combined college course in the psychology of fatalism and intermediate to advanced moral reasoning.

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Cascabel -- World Mental Health Day isn't until the 10th, but I had to take mine today. Today's entire scheduling seems to be a stylish combined college course in the psychology of fatalism and intermediate to advanced moral reasoning.

 

I must say, you combine humor with substance so very, very well. Fatalism and moral reasoning are two of the biggest drawing cards for me in noir. Now what's that other one? Hmmmm.

 

Hey, Mike -- I find it amusing that TCM shows a day of noir as a prelude to showing "Gandhi."

 

As did I. I'd love to hear how that all came to be.

 

Double R -- "Noir" is becoming the most fun forum on the board!

 

I'm glad you feel that way. The primary reason why I joined the TCM board was to discuss Hitchcock and film noir. The Noir forum was pretty dead when I started, so I focused on Hitch. The noir forum is starting to come back to life thanks to people like you.

 

I've got a ton of noirs in my possession and I'm hoping to start firing them up very soon. I'll make sure to share my opinions on these films in this forum, too.

 

DSClassic -- They Live by Night is another noir that I'm not sure how'll you respond to. It's a love story done noir style. I happen to love the film. I saw it for the first time in early-August.

 

the Threat was good good good

 

Very interesting. I taped it today, but who knows when I'll get to it. In a Lonely Place is the next noir for me. I also have Vicki on DVD now. I'm a big fan of I Wake Up Screaming, so I'm definitely curious to see how the remake of it turned out. I know you like the film.

 

Miss Goddess -- but I only have a little room on my tape to record Railroaded , which I've never watched.

 

I think Railroaded is more solid than good, and I believe there is enough good in the film for you to come away thinking the same. It's not a bleak film.

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I watched *Railroaded* and *The Narrow Margin* and came to realize I had seen both before, but the latter film I had never........finished. Until now. I'm HAPPY I stayed with it, it was good--better than Railroaded and I admit I was surprised about the Marie Windsor character, I was all for throwing her off the train to begin with.

 

What I did like about RR was seeing cutie Ward Cleaver playing a tough cop. I think he was very appealing and handsome and generally brought a kind of "reasurring" quality to the proceedings. I guess that's why he made such an ideal TV dad. That girl, the sister of the wrongly suspected laundry truck driver, was dumb to fall for John Ireland's plays; I could have seen through him when I was six years old.

 

*Jane Randolph* was the best---she seems more natural playing a bad girl. I wonder why I think that.

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*Fatalism and moral reasoning are two of the biggest drawing cards for me in noir. Now what's that other one? Hmmmm.*

 

FrankGrimes----Ah, yes, THAT. Every movie on yesterday's schedule featured sexual longing, temptation and jealousy; the mingling of sex and violence; the struggle for power between people (Isn't that always sexual somehow?)--and this includes the very beautiful and reverent *King of Kings* and *Gandhi* (no surprise to those who actually attend church with all the other sinners). It seemed like programming genius to begin with *Lawman*, in which the three older men, each trying to come to terms with his past, continually explore the blurry line between criminal and law-enforcement violence. Then it all ended with *Becket*, where (IMHO) one of the points being argued is that intense friendship is not any nobler than intense sexual love, as foolish people assume when they compartmentalize their feelings. They both have the same source and are, ultimately, the same thing. It was such an exciting, exhausting schedule that I'm glad there wasn't anything on TCM today that I particularly wanted to see again. I can get some work done, catch up on the news. (I'm going by the online schedule. *Now Playing* has the day beginning with *The Asphalt Jungle* and ending with *Alexander Hamilton*, which I had to miss. BTW, I'm also glad most of these movies weren't the creations of modern filmmakers, who would have made nearly every scene too gory and explicit to watch.)

 

*The Narrow Margin* was completely new to me, and I like it so much now. As an avid train-rider, I loved the setting--although I know it could have been even more confining, the passengers ought to have staggered a lot more (especially the women in heels), and there's never just one annoying kid running around underfoot on a train. I've always liked Marie Windsor, but have become a Charles McGraw fan all of a sudden

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Hi, Cascabel -- Ah, yes, THAT. Every movie on yesterday's schedule featured sexual longing, temptation and jealousy; the mingling of sex and violence; the struggle for power between people (Isn't that always sexual somehow?)--and this includes the very beautiful and reverent King of Kings and Gandhi (no surprise to those who actually attend church with all the other sinners).

 

Go on, go on. That was beautifully said, and you made some excellent points.

 

Sexuality is usually quite a potent force in film noir and, you are absolutely correct, the struggle for power between two people can also come off very sexual.

 

Then it all ended with Becket, where (IMHO) one of the points being argued is that intense friendship is not any nobler than intense sexual love, as foolish people assume when they compartmentalize their feelings. They both have the same source and are, ultimately, the same thing.

 

I've never seen Becket -- epics are a wall I've yet to approach, let alone scale -- but you make it sound quite appealing to me.

 

The Narrow Margin was completely new to me, and I like it so much now. As an avid train-rider, I loved the setting--although I know it could have been even more confining, the passengers ought to have staggered a lot more (especially the women in heels), and there's never just one annoying kid running around underfoot on a train. I've always liked Marie Windsor, but have become a Charles McGraw fan all of a sudden

 

I'm also a big fan of The Narrow Margin. It's a lean, claustrophobic film with some style. There's one thing about the film that bothers me a little.

 

SPOILER MARGIN

 

If Marie Windsor is an undercover cop, why did she ever take the chance of playing the music? I know that she wanted Charles McGraw to believe she was the moll, but did she really have to play the music to convince him of this? That seemed to be a little too convenient. Oh well, I always overlook this because I enjoy the film so much.

 

Red River -- They Live by Night really grabbed me by the heart. It's the second film noir that I shed a tear while watching.

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ALEXANDER HAMILTON? Don't know that one. I like historical drama, and that's an interesting era. Even MAGNIFICENT DOLL is cute, if not all that good. David Niven plays Aaron Burr. The treason issue comes up. Oddly, I can't remember if the duel is featured.

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"...why did she ever take the chance of playing the music?"

 

It's a puzzler. I sometimes wonder if there's a rule in Hollywoodland stating that no Internal Affairs police officer can be shown in a completely favorable light. They have to be bumblers?

 

 

redriver--About Alexander Hamilton: I'm still waiting for the long-promised movie based on Gore Vidal's *Burr*. That could be done as an politico-historical biopic film noir. Genre meshing is good.

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